Grains, Seeds, Vegoils & Meals

Dec 15 - Wheat market eyeing Argentina, Russia for next moves (AgriCensus)

Two issues have resonated with the wheat market more than any other this week, with wet weather in Argentina and renewed rumours of a Russian export ban combining to catch a market that was heading into holiday mode off guard.

Rain

Heavy rains started in Argentina’s northern wheat growing region on Tuesday, temporary halting harvest progress and registering as a blip on traders’ radars. As those rains continued to fall, however, interest turned to alarm with some starting to question the quality and condition of the unharvested crop. That wet weather has combined with recent frosts and has left local analysts trimming their output forecasts this week by around 200,000 mt to about 18.7-19 million mt. That has meant cash prices have spiked at a time when they should typically be on the slide, with Agricensus 12% protein marker up more than 5% this week to $228/mt FOB Up River on Thursday. It is a story that is not over, even as more than 100mm (four inches) has fallen in some parts of the country.

“With additional heavy rainfall expected in Santa Fe and Entre Rios through early next week, wetness and flooding will increase further,” meteorological consultants Radiant Solutions wrote in a client note Friday.

Rumours

At the same time as the rains, rumours re-emerged from Russia that the government could step in to limit the pace of exports to prevent domestic food price price inflation. A recurring theme in the wheat market this year, similar stories have precipitated spikes and crashes that have left some in the market scratching their heads, and this week’s movements were no different. The first clue was a tender from the Egyptian state buyer on Wednesday, with GASC paying almost $6/mt more than a week before as traders expect increasing scarcity into the new year as farmers hold onto their stock and wait for higher prices. That move then pushed export levels higher on the private market, with January cargoes trading $3-4/mt higher and adding to the market’s momentum. A local media story on Thursday then announced that the government will meet with exporters on December 21, which – when combined with increasing cash prices – left some believing something was happening behind the scenes.

“It’s a routine monthly meeting, but every time they come up everyone panics,” a broker told Agricensus.

Those attending the meeting also seemed unfazed by it when asked by Agricensus.

“It’s just an ordinary meeting, they will discuss the export pace and nothing more,” a Russian trader said.

Even though the trade has downplayed the risk of a Russian export ban, domestic prices are getting firmer as farmers become increasingly reluctant to sell, which is in turn translating into higher export prices. Agricensus’ 12.5% protein marker has increased almost 6% since the start of the month to $239/mt FOB Novorossiysk.

Paper

And while the board reacted to these unfolding events – rising almost 2% on the SRW and HRW – the most bullish bet of the day was seen in the Black Sea paper market where the December contract was bid up $4.25/mt to $238/mt. But with eight trading days left before the contract settles, Platts’ underlying assessment will have to increase more than $7/mt – and average at $245/mt every day – just for that position to break even.

“They’re going to struggle to make anything out of that, even if the Russian market goes crazy,” one broker told Agricensus.

Dec 14 - U.S. confirms China soybean purchase, but no clarity over more sales 

U.S. government officials on Thursday hailed China's first meager purchase of U.S. soybeans since its trade war with the United States began in July and said they hoped for, but could not guarantee, more to come. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced private sales of 1.13 million tonnes of U.S. soybeans to China, a figure that farmers and grain traders said was not large enough on its own to lift slumping prices or absorb a huge surplus that has accumulated across the farm belt. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 14 - China says corn output falls 0.7 pct, soybeans up 4 pct in 2018

China produced 257.3 million tonnes of corn in 2018, a drop of only 0.66 percent on last year's crop, official data showed on Friday, despite efforts to encourage farmers to plant other grains and soybeans. The world's No. 2 producer of corn harvested 259 million tonnes in 2017, according to the recently revised National Bureau of Statistics data. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 14 - High stocks, low prices clog palm oil supply chain in Southeast Asia 

Palm oil suppliers across Southeast Asia are struggling to cope with record output, with plantations delaying harvest and mills stalling on deliveries as storage tanks overflow, multiple industry sources said. Inventories of the edible oil, used to make consumer goods like shampoo, ice cream and cosmetics, usually peak between the third and fourth quarters of the year as seasonal production peaks, but slower demand this year has accelerated stockpile growth and driven prices to multi-year lows. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 14 - Strategie Grains sees 2019 EU wheat crop rebound to four-year high 

European Union grain crops will jump in 2019 with soft wheat, the main crop cultivated in the bloc, hitting a four-year high due mainly to a sharp rise in projected yields after a severe drought this year, Strategie Grains said on Thursday. In its first estimate for next year's crop, the consultancy estimated the EU soft wheat harvest at 147 million tonnes, up 16 percent from a poor 127 million tonnes in 2018. The area sown was seen rising 6 percent while yields would gain 9 percent. Click here to read full stories. 

Dec 13 - Analysts, traders may trim Brazil crop expectations on dry weather (AgriCensus)

Analysts at brokerages and trading houses in Brazil are debating whether to pare back their expectations for this year’s soybean crop in key growing states due to prolonged dry weather, market sources told Agricensus Thursday. A lack of rain and baking hot temperatures of up to 35C were reached across areas of Mato Grosso do Sul and western Parana in the past 10 days – states that account for a quarter of total soybean production. And the prospect of a lack of rain and above normal temperatures over the next 10 days has led some analysts to shave their forecasts of production in Parana, which was expected to reach up to 20 million – around 16% of the 120.5 million mt production forecast.

“I'm worried with crops in Parana and Mato Grosso do Sul. In the western [part of the country] there is a cut [of] about 20% in the crop. Parana could produce 20 mmt, now we're estimating 18.5-19 million mt. We need rains in the next 7 days, else the cuts will get bigger,” said one analyst at a brokerage.

Last week influential Brazil-based consultants AgRural said that there were concerns over the crop in the region, but said it was still too early to calculate yield losses.

“What we see right now, both in Paraná and Mato Grosso do Sul, is a loss of potential. But, if it rains in the second half of December, they won’t face big losses. On the other hand, if rains don’t come, a crop failure will be very possible,” Daniele Siqueira of AgRural told Agricensus.

On Tuesday the US revised upwards its forecast of Brazilian production this year to 122 million mt, making it one of the more optimistic forecasters, with others expecting a crop of around 120.5 million mt. Either way, it will be a record for Brazil, eclipsing last year’s crop of 119 million mt.

One trader said: “We're monitoring the situation in Parana, also south of Mato Grosso do Sul and Paraguay… if we have rains during the weekend and next week, there'll be some relief.”

Weather forecasters Radiant Solution said in a report Thursday that: “Above normal temperatures and below normal rainfall is expected to continue across Mato Grosso do Sul, Sao Paulo, and northern Parana for at least the next week, which will increase stress on the corn and soybean crops.

“However, showers should begin to increase in south central Brazil by the end of the 6-10 day period and may become widespread by the 11-15 day period.”

AgRural will publish its forecast of the crop on Friday.

Dec 13 - Don't be fooled by China's soybean buy; crude, LNG, coal are the big fish: Russell 

There is a risk that investors will get carried away with optimism over an easing of the U.S.-China trade dispute on the back of China resuming purchases of U.S. soybeans. This is especially the case given there is yet no sign of new imports of crude oil, liquefied natural gas (LNG) and coal, the energy commodities that will provide a far better signal of any detente in the trade spat. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 13 - China makes first big U.S. soybean purchase since Trump-Xi truce 

China on Wednesday made its first major purchases of U.S. soybeans since President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping struck a trade war truce earlier this month, providing some relief to U.S. farmers who have struggled to find buyers for their record-large harvest. Trump told Reuters in an interview on Tuesday the Chinese were already buying a "tremendous amount" of U.S. soybeans and would also soon cut tariffs on U.S. autos. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 13 - China finally to the rescue of the U.S. soy market? Not yet -Braun 

China finally returned to the U.S. soybean market on Wednesday after a six-month hiatus, sending analysts into a frenzy of speculation on what it could mean for the future. But there are some important things to consider before celebrating the top consumer’s reappearance. Chinese state-owned companies bought at least 1.5 million tonnes of the U.S. oilseed on Wednesday, though there was talk that the country is seeking up to 3 million tonnes for now. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 12 - China buys at least 30 cargoes of US soybeans: sources (AgriCensus)

Chinese state-owned buyers are rumoured to have bought up to 30 cargoes of US soybeans, according to three market sources, demonstrating a thaw in trade relations between the US and China. The cargoes were rumoured to have been bought by state-owned companies Sinograin and Cofco, with loading in January, February and March, with the majority off the Pacific Northwest ports.

“We hear about 2 million mt [has been bought],” said one market source, saying the rumoured price was 130 cents per bushel over March futures on a CFR China basis.

“CIF is rallying. Margins are widening. Seems some PNW beans trading,” said a second market source, identifying the sellers as Cargill, Louis Dreyfus and Marubeni and “possibly CHS and ADM”.

“There is talk Sinograin and Cofco bought 30 cargoes of US beans overnight from Cargill, Dreyfus, and Marubeni for loading in January through March, mostly off the Pacific Northwest,” said a third source.

One source close to the transaction confirmed that there were more than a dozen that were contracted late Tuesday, early Wednesday, while two other sources in China and in the US said there were 30 from PNW and a further 10 from the US Gulf. There was also talk that a further 40 would be contracted this week, taking the total to just under 5 million mt. None of the companies themselves were willing to confirm any of the deals, but several sources in China said that cargoes loading in PNW were being offered at the same price of 130 cents per bushel over March futures on Tuesday and Wednesday. Each cargo is about 60,000 mt.

That price nets back to a 30 cent per bushel premium over futures on an FOB basis – around 5 cents higher than where it was offered on Tuesday. The purchases, if true, will show up next Thursday in net export sales figures published by the USDA, and will represent the first time since July that Chinese companies have purchased US soybeans.

Soybean futures have traded higher all day as the market speculated that buying had returned after President Trump told Reuters in an interview late Tuesday that China was buying soybeans in “tremendous amounts”.

Dec 12 - Trump says China 'back in the market' for U.S. soybeans 

President Donald Trump said on Tuesday that China was buying a "tremendous amount" of U.S. soybeans and that trade talks with Beijing were already under way by telephone, with more meetings likely among U.S. and Chinese officials. Trump told Reuters in an interview that the Chinese government was "back in the market" to buy soybeans after a Dec. 1 truce in the U.S.-China trade war. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 12 - White House delays new farm aid payments on China trade hopes - sources 

The White House is delaying additional payments from a $12 billion aid package for farmers stung by President Donald Trump's trade war with China because it expects Beijing to resume buying U.S. soybeans, three sources familiar with the matter told Reuters. The move comes despite a lack of evidence in agricultural markets of any return by China to the U.S. soy market. China last year purchased about 60 percent of U.S. soybean exports, but it has not inked any new soybean deals since Beijing imposed tariffs on U.S. supplies in July. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 12 - Soy market remains patient on U.S.-China trade, but clock is ticking -Braun 

Ever since China's pledge to "immediately" return to the U.S. agriculture space following talks between the two national leaders, market participants have adopted friendlier views toward Chicago-traded ag commodities, specifically soybeans. But 10 days have passed since that agreement and with no tangible progress, market optimism over the potential trade deal may be nearing its expiration date. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 12 - USDA keeps domestic soy stocks view steady; raises world forecast 

The U.S. Agriculture Department on Tuesday left its estimate for domestic soybean supplies unchanged but boosted its outlook for world stocks amid rising expectations for the South American crop. U.S. soybean ending stocks for the 2018/19 marketing year were pegged at 955 million bushels, the government said in its monthly supply and demand report. USDA had boosted its soybean ending stocks view in its five previous monthly reports. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 12 - China-driven Brazil beef bonanza seen lasting - Abiec 

Brazilian exporters are poised to sell record volumes of beef for two consecutive years, driven by strong demand from China, Abiec, an association of more than 30 Brazilian meat-packing companies, said on Tuesday. Brazil will export an estimated 1.626 million tonnes of beef in 2018, the highest volume in history, Abiec said. Next year, the figure may be a new record of 1.8 million tonnes, Abiec President Antonio Camardelli said at a news conference. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 11 - Drought, currency & El Nino combine to panic South Africa’s corn market (AgriCensus)

South Africa’s domestic corn prices have spiked as fears mount over the impact of dry weather during the critical planting period and as the country’s currency depreciates on the international market, sources have told Agricensus Tuesday. The move is enough to again bring the country close to import parity and has seen limits applied to trading on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange’s corn futures contract.

“Things are not looking great on the weather this side, the market is in a bit of a panic,” one trading source said, as rains that were expected in the last few weeks have failed to materialise.

“It is still early days, but the optimistic outlook at the opening of the season has changed,” Wandile Sihlobo, head of agribusiness intelligence at South Africa’s agricultural business chamber, said in a note and the dryness hampering planting could shave 5% off the country’s corn crop.

Sihlobo currently expects the corn crop to come in at around 12.2 million mt, with the USDA forecasting production of 12 million mt.

El Nino

However, the anticipation of an El Nino weather pattern forming through the latter stages of 2018 and beginning of 2019, which typically brings less rainfall to South Africa, is also fostering fears for the coming key crop development stages.

"There are fears of an El Nino later in the 2019 summer season... this implies that the summer crop growing areas could experience more acute dryness from the end of February," Sihlobo said. 

Worries around planting progress – with some states already out of the optimal planting window – have also driven domestic fears, with the December and March corn futures contract seeing trading suspended as prices surged through the daily limit. According to JSE data, the March contract rose by ZAR100/mt ($5.60/mt) on both Friday and Monday, for the first time since early 2017, to reach ZAR2,776/mt ($193.29/mt) at Monday’s close with the December contract climbing even more sharply to ZAR2,789/mt ($194.19/mt).

On December 4, the March contract had ended at ZAR2,470/mt, and December at ZAR2,393/mt.

“We’re very close to booking yellow corn shipments for imports in March,” the trading source said, with Agricensus assessing Argentina FOB Up River corn prices at $171.75/mt, while sources put freight at around $30/mt.

“White maize prices are higher on the back of a lack of rain and of course the weakening rand,” an email from the JSE said, with the rand moving from around 13.691 to the US dollar on December 3, to reach 14.385 against the dollar by December 10.

The higher prices may encourage farmers to plant later into the season, however, as they try and capitalise on the increase and amid hopes that rains will come in the days ahead.

“If we only plant 65% at an average yield, we should have enough stock,” the source said, with the country already seeing a build in stocks as exports have slowed. 

“If prices stay at these levels, we could expect farmers planting deep into January, if they receive rain".

Dec 11 - Bunge CEO Schroder to step down amid investor pressure 

Bunge Ltd Chief Executive Officer Soren Schroder is stepping down after five years at the helm of the global agribusiness following months of pressure from shareholders to shake up the company amid a prolonged grain market slump. The management change is the latest event to rattle the two-century-old commodities trader after a stretch of particularly weak earnings results beginning last year that left the company vulnerable to takeover attempts by rivals Glencore Plc and ADM. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 11 - China set to triple its ethanol production capacity - govt researcher 

China is set to more than triple its ethanol production capacity by 2020, a government researcher said on Tuesday, with demand for the commodity expected to surge as the country shifts towards cleaner fuels. The nation is currently building or seeking approval for new ethanol plants with capacity to produce 6.6 million tonnes of the biofuel a year, Dou Kejun, a researcher at the China National Renewable Energy Centre, told an industry event in the country's south. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 11 - China's commodity import volume surge tells a different tale to slack value growth: Russell 

The prevailing market narrative after China's overall November trade data was that the world's second-biggest economy is softening and starting to show the strains of the trade dispute with the United States. After all, both imports and exports undershot forecasts for the month. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 11 - Louis Dreyfus, Olam big gainers in Brazil's soy export boom - data 

Louis Dreyfus Company and Olam International Ltd have reaped big rewards from a surge in Brazilian soybean exports in 2018 on the back of a U.S.-China trade war that sharply boosted shipments to the Asian nation. According to data from global maritime agency Williams Shipping compiled by Reuters on Monday, relative to the largest commodities traders operating in Brazil, Dreyfus and Olan had the highest percentage increases in soybean exports out of the South American nation in the January-November period, compared to a year earlier. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 11 - Funds pounce on CBOT corn, soy in wake of U.S.-China talks -Braun 

Signs of a trade truce between the United States and China last week unexpectedly spurred speculators’ third-largest buying week of the year in Chicago-traded grains and oilseeds. In the week ended Dec. 4, hedge funds and other money managers purchased a total of 165,032 futures and option contracts of CBOT corn, wheat, soybeans and products, and Minneapolis-traded wheat. Only the weeks of Jan. 30 and March 6 featured heavier buying this year. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 10 - Brazil truckers strike against Supreme Court freight ruling  (Agricensus)

Independent truckers in two of Brazil’s most important states, Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, went on strike on Monday in protest against a recent decision by the Supreme Court to suspend fines against companies that violate the new minimum freight rate regulations.

The strike, which so far has largely failed to spread to other states as the massive 11-day nationwide protest did in the second half of May, is not affecting the movement of goods at Santos, according to Codesp, the port authority.

“There’s no interruption to traffic. It’s a peaceful demonstration without any blockade of the highways,” the Codesp communications department said.

A few minor bottlenecks have been reported by highway police in some major corridors between Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo.

Last week, Supreme Court Justice Luiz Fux, who is in charge of reviewing some 60 appeals, temporarily suspended the ability of the highway regulator ANTT to impose fines on companies that do not adhere to the minimum freight rates that it sets nationally.

Fux said the ANTT should not be handing out fines until the high court has weighed in on the constitutionality of the new freight rate law.

Most of the appeals against the new rates were filed by industry and farming associations, which say that the new regulations have raised transport costs for many industries by 150%.

Truckers originally went on strike in May as local diesel prices began setting almost weekly record highs and squeezing their margins.

Late last week, Tarcisio de Freitas, the future infrastructure minister of President-elect Jair Bolsonaro, said the incoming administration would revise the new minimum freight regulations to accommodate the transport sector, industry and farming, with plans to bring all sides to the negotiating table to hammer out a more viable solution than the current one, according to the ministry’s press representative.

Freitas also said that the new government plans to privatize the upkeep and management of Brazil’s northern soybean road BR-163, which left hundreds of soybean trucks stranded for weeks in the lower Amazon state of Para in early 2018 when the road was washed out by rain.

The 1,500 km highway, which connects the soy- and corn-rich state of Mato Grosso to the so-called northern arc of ports in the lower Amazon basin, is almost entirely paved but for about 70 km and even this segment is currently passable.

Movement of grains along the highway has been growing rapidly and is expected to grow 30% next year to 12 million mt, according to the transport association, Movimento Pro-Logistica.

Dec 10 - China November soybean imports plunge 38 pct y/y on tariff war 

China imported 5.38 million tonnes of soybeans in November, down 38 percent from a year ago and the lowest monthly number in two years, customs data showed on Saturday, after buyers avoided U.S. soybeans amid a tariff war with the United States. The world's top soybean buyer usually gets most of its oilseed imports from the United States in the final months of the year when the U.S. harvest comes to market. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 10 - Bunge preparing to replace CEO Schroder - WSJ 

Bunge Ltd is preparing to replace its Chief Executive Officer Soren Schroder as the global grains trader faces investor pressure, the Wall Street Journal reported on Friday, citing sources. The company is expected to announce the CEO's departure in the coming days, the report said citing people familiar with the matter. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 10 - Brazil's Bolsonaro brokering deal to end trucker, farmer feud 

Brazil's next government is working to strike a deal between farmers and truckers over minimum freight prices by revising the policy, rather than throwing it out as many have demanded, the country's future infrastructure minister said on Friday. The minimum freight rates were imposed as part of a deal to end a truckers strike in May that crippled the countries roadways, preventing food and other essential items from making it to market. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 07 - Brazil's truckers mull strikes, as Supreme Court halts freight rate fines (AgriCensus)

- In a victory for Brazil’s agricultural export sector, Supreme Court Justice Luiz Fux suspended the powers of the country’s highway transport regulator (ANTT) to financially punish companies that pay truckers below the national minimum freight rates set by the agency.

- In August, Fux, who is in charge of the high court's review of more than 60 legal challenges against the minimum freight rates that went into effect in June, decided to leave the minimum rates in place until the full court weighed in on the issue but to suspend the fines that ANTT had threatened to hand out to violators. The suspension of the fines effectively removes the teeth from the minimum rates policy and could trigger sales of raw commodities on the physical markets that have been held up by uncertainty regarding the rates.

- Fux’s decision late on Thursday to strip the ANTT of its power to fine violators handed agroindustry and the commodities export sector a temporary victory in the six-month fight over the new minimum rates.

- President Michel Temer negotiated the rates as a way to get truckers to end a national strike in late May that paralyzed the country. Industrial and agricultural associations immediately filed legal appeals over the imposition of the minimum rates, which they said would cause them billions of dollars in losses yearly.

- Agricultural think-tank Esalq-Log, which is linked to the University of Sao Paulo, estimated that the new rates would raise transport costs for Brazil’s agricultural commodities sector by more than 150% and cause losses of 25 billion reais ($3.6 billion) annually, including soybeans, corn, sugar, coffee and animal protein. Thiago Pera, the coordinator of Esalq-Log, who praised the suspension of the fines, said, “This minimum freight table is overly simplistic.”

- In an open letter signed by 75 industry associations to President-elect Jair Bolsonaro, who will take office in January, Brazil’s grain crushing industry Abiove said the minimum rates represented a policy approach that failed in Brazil’s past during its struggle with hyperinflation.

- Truckers went on national strike in May over soaring fuel prices, which have since eased as the 30% decline in international oil prices peaked in October and amidst modest recent gains by the Brazilian real against the US dollar. Truckers are beginning to discuss a new strike on social media in response to the Supreme Court justice’s decision but no firm decisions have yet been made.

Dec 07 - Argentina soybean exports may hit record high next year-exchange

Argentine soybean exports to China could jump to a record 14 million tonnes this season if the trade war between China and the United States continues, the Rosario grains exchange said on Thursday, as output rebounds from last year's drought. China has all but stopped buying soybeans from the United States. This has driven down the price of U.S. beans. As a result, U.S. soy crushers are shipping to soymeal markets previously supplied by Argentina, which in turn is exporting more raw beans, mainly to China. Click here to read full stories

Dec 07 - U.S. corn, Brazil, steal thunder of U.S. soy exports in October - Braun

October is usually the busiest month for U.S. soybean shippers, but this year corn exports outpaced those of soybeans during the month for the first time since 2007. China’s shunning of U.S. soybeans amid the ongoing trade war between the two countries left a gaping wound on October shipments of the oilseed, opening the door for top exporter Brazil to steal business that traditionally belonged to the United States. Click here to read full stories

Dec 06 - Algeria’s ONAB buys 40,000 mt of Argentina corn from Glencore (AgriCensus)

Algeria’s ONAB has bought a single 40,000-mt corn cargo at tender, with market sources saying international trader Glencore was the seller at $204.37/mt, equating to an FOB Up River value of 50 cents over the March contract. The tender closed Wednesday and sought a total of 80,000 mt of corn, spread across two cargoes for second half December shipment.

It is the second tender from ONAB in recent days, and the second consecutive that one seems to have been only partially fulfilled. ONAB tendered for up to 120,000 mt of corn spread across three 40,000 mt cargoes on November 28 for first half December loading, but secured just one cargo at a price of somewhere between $196 and $198/mt, with scant details on the seller of the earlier cargo. ONAB also tendered for a cargo of soymeal for first half January loading, again with Argentina as the origin.

The aggressive timeline associated with the tender, at a time when Argentina is approaching the end of its typical export season, is likely to have made the volume harder to secure, according to market sources. “We were asking for backing yesterday, but we couldn’t get offers from here,” one Argentina-based broker said, with the timing and lack of abundant supply making it difficult to source competitive volume.

Agricensus assessed the January loading Argentina FOB Up River corn market at 52 cent premium to the March contract, on Wednesday

Dec 06 - China sees greater competition for Brazil soybeans as prices slump (AgriCensus)

Chinese crushers are for the first time in months seeing serious competition to buy Brazilian soybeans after an 11% price slump in the cost of Brazilian beans has made shipments for March cheaper than any other supplier, according to sources and Agricensus data.

Last week Japanese buyers were heard to have purchased two cargoes of Brazilian soybeans and this week one cargo was rumoured to have been sold to Taiwan, as freight- and quality-adjusted prices for new crop soybeans from Brazil loading in March onwards are now below US values.

“Seems from March onwards, Brazil is cheaper than the US, so Thailand, Taiwan, Japan and Mexico are all making enquiries,” said one market source.

Other market sources confirmed that Taiwan was looking to issue a tender to buy soybeans.

According to Agricensus data the spread between soybean cargoes loading in Santos and the US Gulf on an FOB basis in March has fallen to just 29 cents per bushel ($10.65/mt) from almost 80 cents per bushel ($29.40/mt) just two weeks ago.

Once additional freight to Asia of about $7/mt and a protein premium of around $7/mt is taken into account, buyers predominantly in Asia are looking at Brazilian origin for soybeans.

The figures show a similar pattern for April, May and June.

Record crop

With the US starting at a record crop of 125 million mt, news that non-Chinese buyers are looking at buying Brazilian beans instead of US supply will hurt US farmers who had been hoping to mop up non-Chinese demand.

However, the prospect of a resolution to the trade war has seen Brazilian prices crash. This has been on the expectation that Chinese crushers would once again start to buy US soybeans – a dynamic that has yet to emerge.

On Monday, US Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue told reporters he expected to see Chinese buyers come back to the market for US beans in January.

However, Chinese demand for soybeans in the 2018/19 marketing year has been hit by an outbreak of African Swine Fever and a lower threshold for protein in pig feed. Demand is expected to be about 9 million mt, or 10%, lower than the previous marketing year.

To meet US exports forecasts of 51.71 million mt this year, US suppliers need to make net sales of 730,000 mt each week.

According to USDA data, they have only made that total three times in the first 13 weeks of the marketing year, which started in September.

In October, 95% of Brazil’s exports headed to China, according to government figures.

"This year we focused more than 90% of our volume to China, but next year we will need to open our minds [and] develop other destinations," said a third source.

The USDA will next week unveil its last forecast for agricultural supply and demand and a keenly-watched figure will be the US carryout stocks.

Dec 06 - Caught in Russia-Ukraine storm: a cargo ship and tonnes of grain 

When the Island Bay cargo ship arrived from Beirut at the Kerch Strait, gateway to the Azov Sea, it sailed into a perfect storm of geopolitics and bad weather. The following day, Russia opened fire on three Ukrainian naval ships, impounded them and detained their sailors, some of them wounded. It then blocked the strait by putting a tanker underneath a new bridge it has built linking the Russian mainland to the Crimean peninsula it annexed from Ukraine in 2014. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 06 - Traders say Egypt delays wheat payment guarantees, ministry dismisses criticism 

Egypt has not issued letters of credit for 16 recently purchased wheat cargoes which effectively means a delay in payment, sources said on Wednesday, although the authorities said appropriate payment guarantees had been or would be made. The payment issues affect cargoes ordered by the world's largest wheat buyer for 945,000 tonnes of wheat, traders told Reuters, adding that the purchases in state tenders were for shipment to Egypt during Nov. 11-20, Dec. 1-10 and Dec. 11-20. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 06 - Argentina clinches China soyoil export deal, soymeal talks fizzle 

China will ramp up imports of Argentine soyoil after Argentina begins harvesting its next soy crop in March, a government official told Reuters, but talks toward reaching a deal to sell soymeal livestock feed to China have fizzled. The soyoil agreement is good news for Argentine crushing plants that manufacture soyoil and have been hard hit by the U.S.-China trade war. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 05 - China trade truce could benefit more U.S. ag than just soy -Braun 

The recent meeting in Argentina between U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping seems to have gone better than expected by many agriculture market participants, as it suggested a possible end to the ongoing trade war and a prospective boost to U.S. exports. The White House announced over the weekend that Beijing had agreed to buy an unspecified but “very substantial” amount of U.S. commodities, and that purchases of agricultural goods would start “immediately.” Click here to read full stories.

Dec 05 - Brazil's 2018/19 soybean crop could reach 130 mln T - Céleres 

Brazilian farmers could produce between 123 million tonnes and 130 million tonnes of soybeans in the 2018/19 crop cycle, a historic record, Anderson Galvão, chief executive at agribusiness consultancy Céleres, said on Tuesday. Other countries in South America are poised to collect a large harvest, Galvão said at an industry event, indicating benchmark prices were not likely to surpass $9 per bushel in 2019. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 05 - Malaysia Nov palm oil stocks seen at 3 mln tonnes 

Malaysia's palm oil stocks at end-November are likely to touch the 3-million-tonne mark, their highest in recent years, as the drop in exports outweighed leaner production, according to a Reuters survey. Based on the median estimate of eight planters, traders and analysts, stockpiles are expected to jump 10.8 percent from the previous month to 3 million tonnes, their strongest levels in nearly 18 years, according to Refinitiv data. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 05 - Grain markets are mixed as traders monitor the news for developments between President Trump and Chinese President Xi after the two leaders agreed on a 90-day truce on tariffs during G-20. "Traders will continue to watch for any signs of tariff relief and/or export sales from China in the next few days," Allendale analysts say. US Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said Monday that China will likely start buying US soybeans again but it is still unclear whether China will remove tariffs on imports of US soybeans as part of the truce. Soybean futures are up 0.6%, corn futures are up 0.3% and wheat futures are down 0.3%.

Dec 04 - Brazil to export 83m mt of beans as November shipments double (AgriCensus)
- Brazilian soybean exports during November more than doubled on the year to 5.07 million mt as Chinese buyers cleared out Brazil’s storage bins, customs data showed.
- The figure is a new record for the month and surpasses the previous record hit last year of 2.14 million mt.
- Chinese crushers have shifted their Q4 soybean purchases from the US to South America after President Xi Jinping hiked import taxes on US beans as part of a tit-for-tat trade war with the US.
- The data means that Brazilian soybean exports during the first 11 months just came in under the 80 million mt at 79.63 million mt, while another 3.17 million mt is lined up at Brazilian ports to leave during December with most vessels bound for China. That will mean that Brazil will have exported an estimated 83 million mt of beans by the end of the year, or 14.7 million mt more than over the same period last year, which was a record in itself.
- Meanwhile, corn exports during November were up on the year as well, following disappointing monthly export figures over the past few months as ports focussed on soybeans instead. November exports came in just under 4 million mt, 13.6% up on the year, bringing total 2018 exports so far to 19.9 million mt, with another 2.82 million mt lined up, mainly in the port of Santos, to leave during December. That would place 2018 exports at 22.72 million mt, some 6.55 million mt behind last year’s progress.

Dec 04 - Soybeans surge to near 4-mth high, analysts wary of G20 bounce (AgriCensus)
- Soybean futures on the Chicago Board of Trade surged to their highest level since August in early trade on Monday after President Xi pledged to buy agricultural products from the US at G20 talks over the weekend.
- January futures opened above $9/bu for the first time since mid-October and rose to a high of $9.23/bu on the expectation that Chinese crushers may once again start to buy US soybeans.
- On Saturday, the White House issued a statement saying that it would row back on plans to lift the 10% tariff on $200 billion worth of Chinese imported goods to 25%.
In return China agreed “to purchase a not yet agreed upon, but very substantial, amount of agricultural, energy, industrial, and other product from the United States” to cut the trade balance.
- In addition, the statement said that both parties would “immediately begin negotiations on structural changes with respect to forced technology transfer, intellectual property protection, non-tariff barriers, cyber intrusions and cyber theft, services and agriculture.”

Dec 03 - Little-known asset manager makes $1.8 bln bid for Australia's GrainCorp 

Australia's largest listed bulk grain handler GrainCorp Ltd said on Monday it received an unsolicited A$2.38 billion ($1.8 billion) takeover approach from a little-known asset manager, catapulting its shares nearly a third higher. GrainCorp said privately held Long-Term Asset Partners (LTAP) made an all-cash approach of A$10.42 a share, a near-43 percent premium to the stock's closing price on Friday. Confirming the approach, LTAP said it was an asset manager for a trust whose beneficiaries were Australian investors. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 03 - U.S. agency lifts 2019 biofuels mandate, drawing mixed reaction 

The U.S. Environmental Protection agency on Friday lifted its annual blending mandate for advanced biofuels, drawing praise from the U.S. biofuels industry, but disappointment that the government had not done more to protect the agricultural market. Under the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard, oil refiners must blend increasing amounts of biofuels into their fuel each year or purchase blending credits from those that do. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 03 - Brazil farmers on course to collect new record soy crop

Brazil is expected to harvest a record soybean crop in the 2018/19 season as good weather and strong Chinese demand set farmers on course to produce a new bumper crop, a Reuters poll showed on Friday. Farmers are poised to collect nearly 121 million tonnes in the current cycle, a 1.2 percent increase from last year, according to the average estimate of 13 forecasters. Harvesting is set to begin as early as December thanks to a favorable climate in Brazil's agricultural heartland, analysts have said. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 03 - How cynical should you be about the Trump-Xi deal? Watch commodities: Russell 

Perhaps the most interesting thing to try and calculate after the seeming trade ceasefire between the United States and China is the level of cynicism that will greet the new detente. President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping agreed to halt imposing additional tariffs on each other's imports while they try to reach a deal to end their trade dispute within 90 days. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 03 - USDA October soybean crush seen at 182.9 million bushels 

U.S. soybean crushings in October likely totaled 5.488 million short tons, or 182.9 million bushels, according to the average forecast of eight analysts surveyed by Reuters ahead of a monthly U.S. Department of Agriculture report. Estimates ranged from 181.0 million to 184.4 million bushels, with a median of 183.2 million bushels. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 03 - Funds change mind on corn, but not soy ahead of G20 summit - Braun 

Through the final trading session ahead of the weekend’s highly anticipated G20 summit, speculators regained some optimism toward Chicago-traded grain and oilseed futures, though they had been less enthusiastic earlier in the week. The Saturday dinner on the sidelines of the Group of 20 between U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping was expected to yield productive talks about the ongoing trade dispute between the two countries. The outcome has been considered critical for the soybean market since China, the world’s top buyer, has imposed tariffs on and shunned U.S. supply. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 03 - Sanderson Farms to curb human antibiotic use in chicken supply 

Sanderson Farms Inc by March will stop using antibiotics vital to fighting human infections to prevent diseases in chickens, the company said on Friday, becoming the last major chicken producer to step away from the drugs. The move by the third largest U.S. poultry producer addresses concerns that the overuse of antibiotics in chickens may diminish their effectiveness in fighting disease in people. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 03 - What will U.S. corn and soybeans yield in 2019? - Braun 

It might be comically early to start debating yield scenarios for a crop that is still several months away from planting, but the U.S. government's early projections for 2019 and beyond hold some interesting ideas for the years ahead. Each February, the U.S. Department of Agriculture publishes its long-term projections that provide a single representative scenario of the agriculture sector over the next decade. These predictions are both model- and judgment-based, and they assume no domestic or external market shocks. The latest data runs through 2028-29. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 03 - Palm oil body says it finds exploitative labour practices at Malaysia's FGV 

A global palm oil industry watchdog rapped Malaysia's biggest palm oil producer, FGV Holdings, for "exploitative" labour practices, dire living conditions for its workers and lax oversight of contractors that hire its foreign labour. The findings are part of an investigation by a panel at the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) following a Wall Street Journal report in 2015 that detailed abuses faced by foreign workers hired by contractors for FGV plantations. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 03 - China looks to boost agricultural exports to India -Xi 

China was looking to boost agricultural exports to India while increasing imports of rapeseed and soymeal, President Xi Jinping told Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi on the sidelines of a G20 meeting on Friday. Xi also indicated greater trade in the pharmaceuticals sector between China and India, foreign secretary Vijay Gokhale, who was travelling with Modi, said. Click here to read full stories.

Dec 03 - China soymeal futures open 2.2 pct lower after U.S.-China trade truce 

China soymeal futures opened 2.2 pct lower on Monday, hitting their lowest since June, following the agreement of a truce in the trade war between China and the United States. The most actively traded soymeal futures on Dalian Commodity Exchange, for delivery in January, fell more than 2 percent to 2,991 yuan ($430.00) per tonne. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 30 - Spoils of trade war: Argentina loads up on cheap U.S. soybeans 

A ship named the Torrent is nearing the end of a 5,000-mile trip carrying soybeans from the U.S. Great Lakes to Argentina - a journey that only makes economic sense because of the U.S.-China trade war. The ship is scheduled to dock in the Rosario grains hub on Dec. 4, days after the leaders of the world's two largest economies, U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping, hold high-stakes trade talks in Buenos Aires. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 30 - What will U.S. corn and soybeans yield in 2019? - Braun 

It might be comically early to start debating yield scenarios for a crop that is still several months away from planting, but the U.S. government's early projections for 2019 and beyond hold some interesting ideas for the years ahead. Each February, the U.S. Department of Agriculture publishes its long-term projections that provide a single representative scenario of the agriculture sector over the next decade. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 30 - Russia does not expect Ukraine crisis to have big impact on grain exports 

Tensions between Russia and Ukraine in the Azov Sea should not significantly affect Russia's grain exports because it is low season, TASS news agency quoted the Russian agriculture ministry as saying on Thursday. "The Azov route is being actively used for Russian grain exports during the river navigation period, so in the autumn-to-winter time, volumes of shipments via this route go down," TASS quoted the ministry as saying. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 30 - China buys U.S. pork despite trade tariffs as hog disease spreads 

China is loading up on U.S. pork, despite import tariffs imposed due to the trade war, as a highly contagious swine disease ravages the Chinese hog herd. The world's top hog producer and pork consumer last week placed its largest order for American pork since the trade war began, U.S. Department of Agriculture data showed on Thursday. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 30 - U.S. farm sector stockpiles Chinese chemicals before scheduled tariffs 

U.S. agriculture suppliers are stockpiling the Chinese chemicals that farmers need to kill crop pests and boost yields - before tariffs on them more than double on Jan. 1. The additional tariffs, threatened by U.S. President Donald Trump, are part of an eight-month trade war between the United States and China affecting $250 billion worth of Chinese products and $113 billion in U.S. goods. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 30 - Russia's Sovecon sees 2019 grain harvest rising to 121 mln T 

Russia may harvest 121 million tonnes of grain in 2019, 77.3 million tonnes of it wheat, Andrey Sizov, the head of SovEcon agriculture consultancy, said on Thursday, citing preliminary estimates. This year, Russia is expected to harvest 110 million tonnes of grain, 70 million tonnes of it wheat, according to SovEcon's earlier forecasts. The final data will be available at the end of December. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 30 - EPA lifts advanced biofuel mandate for 2019 - document 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency lifted its annual blending mandate for advanced biofuels by 15 percent for 2019, while keeping steady the requirement for conventional biofuels like corn-based ethanol, according to an agency document seen by Reuters on Thursday. The mandate includes 4.92 billion gallons for advanced biofuels that can be made from plant and animal waste, an increase from the EPA's initial proposal in June of 4.88 billion and above the 4.29 billion that had been set for 2018, according to the document. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 30 - U.S. lawmakers seal Farm Bill agreement in principle 

U.S. lawmakers have struck a deal in principle on the Farm Bill, the top agriculture lawmakers and senators said on Thursday, capping months of bitter partisan debate over the legislation to fund $867 billion in food and agriculture programs. "We are pleased to announce that we’ve reached an agreement in principle on the 2018 Farm Bill," a joint statement from the chairmen and ranking members of Senate and House Agriculture Committees said. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 30 - Angry Indian farmers march on parliament to denounce their plight 

Tens of thousands of Indian farmers and rural workers marched to the Indian parliament in the capital, New Delhi, on Friday in a protest against soaring operating costs and plunging produce prices that have brought misery to many. The protest is one of the biggest displays of frustration with Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government, which faces a tough general election due by May next year. India's 263 million farmers make up an important voting bloc. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 29 - Penny for your corn? Stingy trade-war aid irks U.S. farmers 

Iowa corn farmer Bob Hemesath jokes that the government check he expects as compensation for his trade-war losses will soon allow him to splurge on upscale coffee in town instead of his usual burnt gas-station brew. Rob Sharkey, an Illinois farmer, hopes his corn trade aid check will be big enough for that margarita machine he and his wife have been eyeing – but they doubt they'll be any left over for the booze. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 29 - China's soybean crush margins turn negative for first time since August 

Soybean crush margins in China have turned negative for the first time since early August, pressured by lower demand for the soymeal they churn out following an outbreak of African swine fever and high domestic bean inventories. African swine fever, deadly to pigs but not harmful to people, has spread rapidly through China, with more than 70 cases reported across farms since early August. Soymeal is used to make animal feed.Click here to read full stories.

Nov 29 - Soy market awaits game of deal or no deal between Trump and Xi - Braun 

In one of the more highly anticipated dinner parties of recent years, U.S. President Donald Trump will dine with Chinese President Xi Jinping this Saturday to discuss trade relations while commodity market participants anxiously await the outcome. Soybean market-watchers might be particularly on edge, as they hope the rendezvous on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Buenos Aires will get the ball rolling toward a resolution over recent trade issues, which have caused the world’s top soybean buyer China to snub U.S. soybeans. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 29 - Angry farmers could upset India's Modi in major state elections test 

Weak farm prices are threatening to hurt Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's Hindu nationalist party as it faces a critical test in three state elections dominated by rural voters in the Hindi-speaking belt that is its traditional stronghold. On a visit last week to the most crucial of the three states, Madhya Pradesh, which was voting on Wednesday, Reuters spoke to 134 rural voters along a 400 km (250 miles) corridor - 89, or about two-thirds, said they would vote for the opposition Congress party rather than the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP). Click here to read full stories.

Nov 29 - Ukraine says martial law not affecting Azov Sea grain exports but outlook unclear 

The imposition of martial law is not affecting Ukrainian grain shipments from ports on the Azov Sea so far and if necessary they can be diverted to the Black Sea, Ukraine's acting agriculture minister told Reuters on Wednesday. More broadly, the prospects for grain exports from the Azov Sea are unclear at this point, Maksym Martyniuk said in messaged comments. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 29 - Australia poised for sweltering summer, threatening cattle industry 

Australia is set for a hotter-than-average summer, the country's weather bureau said on Thursday, threatening one the world's largest cattle industries and stoking the risk of bushfires. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) said there was an 80 percent chance the vast majority of the country would record warmer-than-average temperatures between Dec. 1 and Feb. 28. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 29 - Farm Bill deal 'very close,' U.S. senators say 

U.S. lawmakers are very close to reaching a consensus in days on the Farm Bill, two senior senators said on Wednesday, after months of bitter partisan debate over the legislation to fund $867 billion in food and agriculture programs. "We have finally reached a point where I think we're very close and very encouraged," Republican Senator Pat Roberts from Kansas, who heads the Senate's Agriculture Committee, told reporters. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 29 - Malaysia keeps Dec crude palm oil export tax at zero pct 

Malaysia maintained its export tax on crude palm oil for December at zero percent, according to a circular on the Malaysian Palm Oil Board's website, citing the national customs department. The export tax was at zero percent in November. Malaysia is the world's second-largest producer of palm oil. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 28 - Single word keeps some farmers from getting Trump's aid to offset tariffs 

A Republican lawmaker wants to change a single word in the Trump administration's farm aid program saying some soybean growers in Louisiana cannot qualify for the payments designed to offset farmers' losses from tariffs against China. Representative Ralph Abraham said his bill would allow the $12 billion in farm aid payments to be made based on "planted acres" instead of "harvested acres."  Click here to read full stories.

Nov 28 - Crop drop: China swine fever outbreak to curb its soybean imports 

China's imports of soybeans are set to drop as an outbreak of African swine fever hits its huge pig herd and saps demand for the animal feed ingredient, making it easier for buyers to keep shunning U.S. cargoes amid the Sino-U.S. trade war. African swine fever, deadly to pigs but not harmful to people, has spread rapidly through China, with more than 70 cases reported across farms since early August. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 28 - Pulp Friction: Pulp futures pummelled on Shanghai debut 

Pulp futures endured a dismal trading debut on the Shanghai Futures Exchange (ShFE) on Tuesday as a combination of weak demand and high inventory levels caused prices to plunge by the maximum permitted 10 percent. The contract for the paper-making raw material is China's 50th commodities futures contract, Fang Xinghai, vice chairman of the China Securities Regulatory Commission, said at a launch ceremony in Shanghai that was also attended by Timothy Brown, vice president of the Pulp and Paper Products Council. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 28 - Ukraine 2018 grain crop reaches 68.2 mln T, exceeds expectations 

Ukraine's 2018 grain harvest reached 68.2 million tonnes as of Nov. 27, exceeding the previous forecast of 68 million tonnes, the agriculture ministry said on Tuesday. The ministry said farmers had harvested 14.5 million hectares of grain with a yield of 4.7 tonnes per hectare. The 2018 sown area totals 14.84 million hectares. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 28 - EPA will not reallocate waived biofuel volumes to 2019 mandate - official 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has rejected requests from the corn lobby to reallocate biofuel volumes waived under its small refinery exemption program into its 2019 mandate, an agency official told Reuters on Tuesday. The official also said the 2019 biofuel mandate figures, due to be released this week, would be largely in line with the agency's June proposal of 19.88 billion gallons, which includes 15 billion gallons of convention biofuels like ethanol. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 28 - Sovecon ups forecast for Russia's 2018/19 grain, wheat exports 

Sovecon, one of the leading agricultural consultancies in Moscow, said on Tuesday it had upgraded its forecast for Russia's 2018/19 grain exports to 43.2 million tonnes from a previously expected 42.6 million tonnes. It increased its wheat exports forecast to 34.7 million tonnes from 34.2 million tonnes. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 28 - China, Spain sign export accord for Iberian ham - government sources 

China and Spain will on Wednesday sign an accord on the export of Iberian ham to China, a Spanish government source said on Tuesday, in a deal that will include coveted, on-the-bone legs of pork. The two countries have been negotiating a protocol on the export of pork products from Spain to China since 2016 and the agreement aims to include a wide range of pork products, according to the Spanish agriculture ministry. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 28 - Dairy issue nags as U.S., Canada prepare to sign trade pact - sources 

Dairy remains a sticking point between the United States and Canada as the countries prepare to sign a new North American trade pact this week, according to four sources familiar with the matter. U.S. objections to Canada's protected internal market for dairy products was a major challenge facing negotiators during talks on the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), and the issue remains a problem. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 28 - Malaysia's FGV posts qtly loss, palm price outlook "bearish" 

FGV Holdings Bhd, Malaysia's largest palm oil producer, posted a second straight quarterly loss on Wednesday, dragged down by low crude oil prices and impairments, and flagged a negative end to the year. Palm oil prices hit a more than three-year low this week on weak demand and oversupply, while FGV has been hit by impairments relating to the 2014 acquisition of an oil plantation group. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 27 - Argentina says it is close to inking a beef deal with U.S.  

Argentina is on the verge of signing a deal with the United States that would allow two-way trade of fresh beef for the first time in nearly two decades, the South American country's international trade secretary, Marisa Bircher, said. The agreement, expected to be signed within days, would simultaneously open beef imports to both countries, Bircher told Reuters in an interview. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 27 - Dry soil hampers emergence of grains in parts of EU - MARS 

Dry weather in early autumn hampered the sowing and development of grains in central Europe, but crops in most parts of the European Union have started the season well, EU crop monitor MARS said on Monday. "Favourable conditions for the sowing and emergence of winter crops prevailed in most parts of western and northern Europe," MARS said in a monthly report. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 27 - Funds ditch optimism for CBOT corn, soymeal - Braun 

Investor optimism in Chicago-traded corn fizzled just in time for the Thanksgiving holiday, which coincided with general pessimism across the board for CBOT grain and oilseed futures. The overall negativity continued in the days after, except for in the wheat market. In the week ended Nov. 20, hedge funds and other money managers flipped to a net short position in CBOT corn futures and options of 7,845 contracts according to data from the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 27 - Removing Indonesia palm oil levy will not help prices - refiner group 

An Indonesian government decision to lower the levy on crude palm oil (CPO) exports to zero would remove incentives for local refiners, a palm industry refiner body said on Tuesday. Facing low palm prices, the government on Monday said it will temporarily lower export levies on CPO and palm oil products to zero, from a range of $20 to $50 per tonne, aiming to make its products more competitive. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 27 - Brazil's Minerva Chile unit IPO could pave the way for deals 

Brazilian meatpacker Minerva SA, which plans to list shares of a Chilean subsidiary next year, will consider acquisitions elsewhere in South America once the transaction is complete, executives said on Monday. The listing of Athena Foods, which accounts for about 40 percent of Minerva's gross sales, will allow the group to keep diversifying its export base in South America, where production costs are lower than in markets such as the United States, the executives said during a company presentation. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 27 - NZ's Fonterra says COO of consumer & foodservice business resigns 

New Zealand dairy giant Fonterra on Tuesday said the chief operating officer (COO) of its consumer and foodservice business, Lukas Paravicini, has resigned. Paravicini is set to leave the company in January 2019 and he and his family plan to return to Europe, Fonterra said. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 26 - Malaysia says to fully implement new biodiesel programme from Feb 

Malaysia on Monday said it would start to phase in a higher biodiesel mandate from next month, with the new rule coming into full force from February in an effort to bolster palm oil prices The so-called B10 biodiesel programme will raise the minimum bio-content that local producers must put in biodiesel to be used in transport to 10 percent from 7 percent, potentially boosting demand for palm oil as a feedstock. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 26 - Indonesia's palm oil output edges lower in Oct - Reuters survey 

Indonesia's palm oil production and exports fell in October from the previous month following the peak of the harvest season, while domestic consumption rose on demand for biodiesel, according to the median results of a Reuters survey Palm oil output fell to 3.99 million tonnes in October, from 4.25 million tonnes in September, according to a survey of two palm oil groups and a state palm research firm. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 26 - China approves Kazakhstan barley, corn to diversify imports 

China approved imports of barley and corn from Kazakhstan, the customs administration said on Friday, in a move aimed at diversifying the country's sources of grain shipments. The approval came the same week that China launched an anti-dumping probe into barley imports from Australia, its top supplier of the grain, amid strained ties between Beijing and Canberra. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 26 - South Korea's NOFI tenders for up to 69,000 tonnes corn 

South Korea's largest feedmaker Nonghyup Feed Inc. (NOFI) has issued an international tender to purchase up to 69,000 tonnes of corn, European traders said on Monday. The tender deadline is also Monday, Nov. 26. The corn was sought from optional origins for arrival in South Korea around April 10, 2019. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 26 - China confirms new African swine fever outbreak in Hubei province 

China's agriculture ministry confirmed a new African swine fever outbreak in Hubei province on Monday. The fresh outbreak, found on a pig farm in Huangshi city, Hubei, killed five of the 63 pigs, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said in a statement published on its website. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 26 - Brazil's soybean farmers may start harvesting in December - AgRural 

Brazilian soybean farmers in the key state of Mato Grosso may start harvesting the crop before the end of December, agribusiness consultancy AgRural said on Friday, as the pace of sowing has been the fastest in history. Mato Grosso farmers, who have enjoyed great weather and an excellent start to the season, have basically finished planting. Brazil's overall soy planting reached 89 percent of an estimated 35.8 million hectare area in the 2018/19 season, compared with a historical average of 78 percent, AgRural said. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 23 - Argentine bid to win access to China soymeal market stalled - chamber 

Talks to allow Argentine soymeal livestock feed to enter China are progressing at a slower-than-hoped pace amid bureaucratic issues, including Chinese demands to inspect local crushing plants, the head of Argentina's soy industry chamber said on Thursday. Luis Zubizarreta, president of Argentina's ACSOJA soy industry chamber that represents farmers, exporters and seed companies, said the country was keen to clinch an export deal that would secure access to the world's biggest hog- and pork-producing country. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 23 - Russia eyes new wheat export frontiers in challenge to EU, U.S.  

Russia, already the world's leading wheat exporter, is bent on taking further market share from the European Union and United States with a new attempt to crack what have traditionally been its most difficult destinations. Successful marketing campaigns in Iraq, Saudi Arabia and Algeria would cement Russia's leading position in the wheat markets of the Middle East and North Africa. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 23 - IGC trims 2018/19 world corn forecast on lower US output 

An improved crop outlook in Ukraine is expected to mostly offset lower output from the United States, with the International Grains Council on Thursday only slightly lowering its global corn production forecast for the 2018/19 season. In a monthly report, the inter-governmental body trimmed its forecast for world corn (maize) production in the 2018/19 season by 1 million tonnes to 1.073 billion tonnes, reflecting a downward revision in the U.S. crop. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 23 - France set for first wheat shipment to China in years 

A vessel is due to call at the northern French port of Dunkirk this week to load what would be the first cargo of French wheat for China in nearly five years, shipping data showed on Thursday. The Kypros Bravery, a panamax-sized bulk carrier, is scheduled to arrive at Dunkirk on Friday and expected to load 63,000 tonnes of milling wheat for China next week, the data showed. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 23 - China says pig supplies, prices stable as African swine fever reaches capital 

China's hog supply and prices are stable, said an agriculture ministry official on Friday, as deadly African swine fever reached the capital Beijing for the first time. The ministry had said earlier in the day that the disease had been found on two farms in the city's southwest district of Fangshan. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 23 - India to give 5 pct subsidy for non-basmati rice exports for 4 months - govt 

India, the world's biggest rice exporter, will provide incentives for non-basmati rice exports, the government said in an order reviewed by Reuters, as part of efforts to boost flagging overseas sales of the staple. The government will give a subsidy of 5 percent for non-basmati rice exports for the four months to March 25, 2019, the trade ministry said in the order dated Nov. 22. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 22 - EU rapeseed sowings disrupted by drought, more imports possible 

A sharp cut in rapeseed sowings in the European Union’s main producers has raised industry fears of a smaller than expected 2019 crop and a larger import need. Dry autumn weather caused big cuts in rapeseed sowings in the EU’s top producers Germany, France and Britain while in Poland sowings are only expected to be the same as last year. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 22 - Indian farmers back in Mumbai to demand land rights, loan waivers 

Tens of thousands of farmers from India's western state of Maharashtra marched to the state capital Mumbai on Thursday to demand loan waivers and the transfer of forest lands to villagers who have farmed there for decades. It was the latest protest by farmers against a state government headed by Prime Minister Narendra Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party, which faces a general election in May and a handful of state polls in the coming weeks. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 22 - Deere cautious on 2019 profit after missing 4th-qtr estimate 

Deere & Co on Wednesday gave a cautious profit forecast for fiscal 2019 after missing quarterly earnings estimates amid a U.S. trade battle with China that has depressed local farm commodity prices and hurt agriculture equipment demand. The world's largest tractor manufacturer remained optimistic about prospects for the U.S. farm economy for the coming year, forecasting higher wheat and corn exports offsetting soft demand for soybeans. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 22 - Ukraine grain exports reach 16.6 mln T - ministry 

Ukrainian grain exports have reached 16.6 million tonnes so far in the July 2018-June 2019 season, compared with 15.8 million by the same point of the previous season, the agriculture ministry said on Thursday. Ukraine has said it plans to harvest 68 million tonnes of grain this year versus 61.3 million in 2017, and the ministry has said exports could rise to 47 million tonnes in the July 2018 to June 2019 season from 39.4 million a season before. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 22 - Cotton prices gain on short-covering, equities rebound 

ICE cotton futures rose about 2 percent on Wednesday after two days of losses, as investors covered short positions ahead of the U.S. Thanksgiving Day holiday, global stocks rallied on technology earnings, and crude oil prices climbed on strong data. The most active cotton contract on ICE Futures U.S., the March contract rose 1.44 cents, or 1.86 percent, at 78.87 cents per lb as of 1421 EST (1921 GMT). Click here to read full stories.

Nov 22 - Cashew prices jump nearly 10 pct after Tanzania price hike 

The global price of cashew nuts has jumped nearly 10 percent over the past week, after Tanzania's government started buying the entire country's stock at a higher price, a trader said. Growers of cashews, the most valuable export crop for the East African nation, had been holding back from selling after prices fell below what they said it cost them to produce. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 22 - Germany applies to China to resume poultry exports – ministry 

The German government has applied for permission from China to resume imports of German poultry meat, Germany's agriculture ministry said on Wednesday. China in July agreed in principle to reopen its market to imports of German poultry meat which had been stopped after an outbreak of bird flu disease in Germany. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 21 - Harvesting in a trade war: U.S. crops rot as storage costs soar 

U.S. farmers finishing their harvests are facing a big problem - where to put the mountain of grain they cannot sell to Chinese buyers. For Louisiana farmer Richard Fontenot and his neighbors, the solution was a costly one: Let the crops rot. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 21 - China keeps defying predictions that it would run out of soybeans - Braun 

When the U.S.-China trade dispute escalated earlier this year, most market participants assumed China could never completely cut U.S. soybeans out of its import program due to the sheer volume it consumes. However, the U.S. soybean season has reached its typical peak export week and Chinese buyers are still nowhere in sight, worrying analysts that China may have pulled off the impossible. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 21 - Australian drought, sporty shoppers push up prices of wool clothing 

A jump in the price of wool from drought-ravaged Australia, the world's top exporter of high-quality fleeces, is rattling through the global clothing supply chain, with some mills passing along costs and retailers cutting down on wool or raising prices. Italian clothmaker Botto Giuseppe, which supplies luxury brands Giorgio Armani SpA and Max Mara, says it has increased prices on average by 7 to 8 percent in the last year on wool fabric, while high-end Swiss-based sportswear label Mover has put up the retail price of its merino wool t-shirts by 15 percent. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 21 - China cracks down on African swine fever reporting 

China on Wednesday issued new rules to tighten notification of cases of African swine fever, including incentives for whistleblowers, amid concerns that outbreaks of the highly contagious disease are being under reported. The notice comes as the world's top pork producer struggles to contain the disease with more than 60 outbreaks in 18 provinces since early August, leading to the culling of hundreds of thousands of pigs. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 21 - Chevron granted waiver from U.S. biofuel laws at Utah plant - source 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency granted oil major Chevron Corp a 2017 hardship waiver from U.S. biofuel laws for its Utah refinery earlier this year, according to a source familiar with the company's operations. Chevron, which reported a net income of $9.2 billion in 2017, becomes the largest known company to be awarded a hardship waiver from the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), which requires refiners to blend biofuels like ethanol into their fuel pool or buy compliance credits from competitors that do. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 21 - EPA plans biofuel 'reset' as program misses U.S. Congress' targets

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will propose new targets for the final three years of thenation's renewable fuel program in January, replacing ambitious decade-old goals set by Congress with volumes closer to the industry's current output, two people familiar with the matter said. The planned reset of the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard is likely to set up a fresh battle between two industries, with corn growers wanting the highest possible targets to spur investment, and oil companies eyeing the smallest to reduce costs. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 21 - U.S. judge selects first case in federal Monsanto weed-killer litigation 

A U.S. judge overseeing the federal litigation against Bayer AG's Monsanto unit over glyphosate-based weed-killers allegedly causing cancer on Tuesday selected the first case to be tried in federal court in February 2019. U.S. District Judge Vince Chaabria in San Francisco in an order said the case of California resident Edwin Hardeman will be the first out of more than 620 cases pending in the federal litigation to go to a jury. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 20 - Malaysian Cash Market Prices for Palm Oil Unavailable
Data for a.m. and p.m. Malaysian cash market prices for palm oil are unavailable due to a holiday (Maulidur Razul)

Nov 20 - Mexico authorizes 26 new Brazil meat plants to export chicken 

Mexico has authorized 26 Brazilian meat plants to export chicken products into the country, Brazil's Agriculture Ministry said on Monday, as the two nations seek to strengthen commercial ties amid a realignment of global trade partnerships. The authorization, coming after a Mexican mission visited the plants in August, raised to 46 the total number of units in Brazil authorized to export chicken to Mexico. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 20 - Ukraine sea port grain exports fall 53 pct in Nov. 10-16 week

Ukrainian grain exports from sea ports fell to 665,000 tonnes in the Nov. 10-16 week from 1.4 million tonnes a week earlier, analyst APK-Inform said on Monday. The consultancy said in a statement that smaller shipments of wheat and barley were the main reason for the drop. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 20 - Green Plains stops offering byproduct feed from Nebraska ethanol plant 

Green Plains Inc said it has stopped offering distillers dried grains, a byproduct of ethanol production used as high-protein feed for animals, from its 121-million-gallon-a-year ethanol plant in Wood River, Nebraska. Company spokesman Jim Stark said the move was based on market conditions and denied market talk that it reflected a decision by the company to prepare to idle the plant. "Not offering dried distillers grains is a market decision, not a run rate decision," he said. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 20 - Fertiliser maker Yara replaces CFO for second time in eight months 

Yara Chief Financial Officer Petter Oestboe has resigned with immediate effect amid poor relations with Chief Executive Officer Svein Tore Holsether, the Norwegian fertiliser maker said on Monday. "The cooperation between the two, the chief executive and the CFO, did not function well enough," Yara spokeswoman Kristin Nordal said of Oestboe's departure. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 20 - China says to take tough steps to fight African swine fever 

China will take tough steps to wipe out African swine fever and will crack down on any behavior that delays or covers up cases of the disease from being reported, a senior official at the agricultural ministry said. That came after the first case of the fever in Sichuan province, the country's leading pig-herding region, was confirmed last Friday. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 20 - Russian wheat export prices rise on supply dip 

Russian wheat export prices rose slightly last week on seasonal declines in supply, analysts and traders said on Monday. The world's largest wheat exporter has already exported more than 22 million tonnes of grain since the start of the season, from the 38-39 million tonnes that Russia's agriculture ministry estimates to be available in the 2018/19 season. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 19 - China spooks grain trade with anti-dumping probe into Australia barley imports

China on Monday launched a probe into whether Australian barley suppliers dumped cheap imports into their biggest market over the past year, catching the grain trade on the hop just as drought shrivels Australian crops and drives prices higher. Coming amid strained diplomatic ties between Beijing and Canberra, the move by Beijing's commerce ministry comes after the China Chamber of International Commerce complained that Australian barley was sold at lower-than-normal prices for the 12 months through September 2018, hurting domestic suppliers. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 19 - USDA terminates Chinese-owned Smithfield farm aid contract

The U.S. Department of Agriculture terminated a $240,000 purchase contract with Chinese-owned Smithfield Foods that had been awarded under the Trump administration's agricultural trade bailout program, a move taken at the company's request, a department spokesman told Reuters on Friday. The move comes weeks after Republican Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa, one of the country's biggest farm states and the biggest hog-producing state, slammed Smithfield for receiving what he said was aid from the USDA that was meant to help American farmers hurt by China's trade tariffs. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 19 - French wheat crop ratings at lowest in years after drought

Initial conditions for newly sown French soft wheat are at their worst in six years, data from farming agency FranceAgriMer showed on Friday, as the European Union's biggest grain producer continued to feel the effects of this year's drought. In its first published rating of wheat sown for next year's harvest, FranceAgriMer estimated that 82 percent of soft wheat crop were in good or excellent condition by the end of last week. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 19 - New blow to China as African swine fever found in wild boar

China's efforts to stem the spread of African swine fever were dealt a fresh blow on Friday when the agricultural ministry confirmed it had found the first case in a wild boar, deepening a three-month-old crisis for the world's top pork producer. The country also confirmed the first outbreak in the southwest province of Sichuan, the country's leading pig-herding region, raising the likelihood of a major impact on pork supplies in coming months. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 19 - Tractor maker Deere aims to ride green revolution in Africa

U.S. Deere & Co expects to see demand for its farm equipment in Africa grow 8 to 10 percent annually in the coming years, driven by expansion in key markets like Ethiopia and Zimbabwe, a local company executive said. Farming accounts for around 60 percent of total employment in Africa, according to the World Bank. In Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia, food production is projected to add more jobs than the rest of the economy combined through 2025. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 19 - Urban ranching: A socialist commune's response to Venezuela's crisis

A socialist commune has drawn the ire of its neighbors in a wealthy area of Caracas with an unusual response to the hyperinflation and food shortages afflicting Venezuela: turning its backyard into an urban cattle pasture. The leaders of the Apacuana commune, devotees of socialist President Nicolas Maduro, drove six hours to purchase 11 450-kilo (992-lb) cows. They set them to graze behind their 2,000-square meter (21,528 square-foot) home, donated by the state-owned telecommunications company two years ago. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 16 - Strategie Grains raises EU maize crop estimate again, now above 2017 

Consultancy Strategie Grains increased its estimate for this year's grain maize harvest in the European Union for the second consecutive month on Thursday and now expects it to be larger than last year's crop. The EU's grain maize production in 2018 is now seen reaching 60.0 million tonnes, up from 59.4 million estimated in October, with the main revisions in Romania, Hungary, Austria and France, Strategie Grains said in a monthly report. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 16 - NOPA October soy crush hits record-high 172.346 mln bushels 

U.S. oilseed processors crushed a record volume of soybeans in October while soyoil stocks declined for a sixth straight month, the National Oilseed Processors Association (NOPA) said on Thursday. NOPA members, which handle about 95 percent of all soybeans processed in the United States, crushed a record 172.346 million bushels of soybeans last month, up from the 160.779 million bushels processed in September and 164.242 million bushels in October 2017, the group said. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 16 - Ukraine grain exports rise to 16 mln T so far in 2018/19 

Ukrainian grain exports have already exceeded last season's level and reached 16 million tonnes thanks to large corn sales, Ukraine's state service for food safety said on Thursday. Ukraine has said it planned to harvest 64 million tonnes of grain this year versus 61.3 million in 2017 and the agriculture ministry has said exports could rise to 42.5 million tonnes in the 2018/19 July-June season from 39.4 million last season. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 16 - USDA says nearly $840 million in aid paid to farmers to date 

U.S. Department of Agriculture has paid out nearly $840 million to farmers to date as part of a promised $12 billion aid program rolled out by President Donald Trump last July to offset losses from the imposition of tariffs on American exports. A total of $837.8 million to date has been paid out with the top five commodities being soybeans, wheat, corn, dairy and hogs, USDA told Reuters. The five states that received the highest amount of aid were Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Indiana and Minnesota. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 16 - California judge orders next Monsanto weed-killer cancer trial for March 

A California judge on Thursday granted an expedited trial for March in the case of a California couple suffering from cancer who sued Bayer AG's Monsanto unit, alleging the company's glyphosate-containing weed killer Roundup caused their disease. The order by Superior Court Judge Ioana Petrou in Oakland, California, comes on the heels of a $289 million verdict in the first glyphosate trial in San Francisco in which a jury found Monsanto liable for causing a school groundskeeper's cancer. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 16 - India's 2017/18 palm oil imports drop on weak rupee, liquidity crunch 

India's 2018/2019 palm oil imports dropped 6.4 percent from a year ago to 8.7 million tonnes as rupee depreciation and a credit crunch dented refiners' ability to buy overseas, a leading trade body said on Thursday. India, the world's biggest importer of edible oils, buys palm oil from Indonesia and Malaysia, soyoil mainly from Argentina and Brazil, and sunflower oil from Ukraine. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 16 - China confirms African swine fever in top pig region Sichuan 

China's agricultural ministry confirmed on Friday the first outbreak of deadly African swine fever in the southwest province of Sichuan, the country's top pig-producing region, raising the likelihood of a major impact to pork supplies in coming months. The outbreak was found on a farm of 40 pigs in Yibin city, in Sichuan's southeast. This is the 18th province or municipality to have reported an outbreak of African swine fever since the highly contagious disease was first detected in China in early August. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 16 - U.S. generation of renewable fuel credits rise in October - EPA 

The United States generated higher numbers of renewable fuel blending credits in October compared with September, the Environmental Protection Agency said on Thursday. Some 1.27 billion ethanol (D6) blending credits were generated in October, up from 1.22 billion in September, and 348 million biodiesel (D4) blending credits were generated in October, compared with 322 million a month earlier. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 16 - Green Plains shuts plant, faces ethanol downturn 

Green Plains Inc, the nation's fourth-largest ethanol producer, has permanently shuttered a Virginia production plant and cut output at several other facilities as it tries to navigate a supply glut that has pummeled biofuel profits. Green Plains announced on Thursday that it was closing a plant in the town of Hopewell that had capacity to produce 60 million gallons annually. Thirty-one jobs will be cut, it said in a news release. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 16 - Singapore's Wilmar may invest in soybean production in Russia 

Singapore-listed commodity trader Wilmar International Ltd may invest in soybean production and processing and transhipment of soybean concentrates in Russia's Far East, a regional ministry said on Thursday. Wilmar's long-term investment programme in the Far East has been developed with Russian support, the ministry for the development of the Far East said in a statement, summing up meetings between officials and potential investors on the sidelines of a regional conference in Singapore, which President Vladimir Putin attended this week. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 15 - France sets out plans to tackle deforestation

France set out plans on Wednesday to tackle deforestation around the world, saying it would look to curb imports of products such as palm oil, soy, and beef which it said contributed to the problem of forest areas disappearing. Palm oil, a type of vegetable oil used in confectionery and other goods, is controversial because of the environmental impact of clearing forests to make way for plantations. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 15 - World needs more U.S. wheat, China can hold off on U.S. soy - traders 

The global grain market needs more U.S. wheat to make up for tightening supply in other major exporting zones, but China will be able to keep shunning U.S. soybeans in its trade tussle with Washington, grain merchants said on Wednesday. U.S. soybean shipments to China have dried up in recent months after Beijing raised tariffs on the most valuable U.S. agricultural export to the country.  Click here to read full stories.

Nov 15 - U.S. farmers scramble to contain trade-war damage, find new markets 

Clouds crowded the Illinois sky as Nick Harre walked away from his combine at the peak of harvest to join four fellow farmers in greeting some unlikely visitors. Inside a nearby seed barn, they made their pitch to eight Sri Lankan government officials: Please buy our soybeans. The wooing of such a tiny market underscores the depth of U.S. farmers’ problems after losing their biggest customer, China, to a global trade war. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 15 - Brazil record soy exports to China could expand further - official 

Brazil's record soy exports to China could grow further, an Agriculture Ministry official told Reuters on Wednesday, as the Asian nation's trade war with the United States boosts its demand for South American beans. Odilson Ribeiro e Silva, vice minister of international affairs, traveled to China this month and said he hopes the high demand will also open the country up to Brazilian soymeal. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 15 - FranceAgriMer cuts forecast for French wheat exports within EU 

Farm office FranceAgriMer cut its forecast of French 2018/19 soft wheat exports within the European Union on Wednesday, mainly due to lower shipments to Spain where the harvest has rebounded after severe drought damage last year. In monthly supply-and-demand estimates, FranceAgriMer put French wheat sales to other EU member states at 7.8 million tonnes, down from 7.9 million tonnes seen last month and 16 percent below a record high last year. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 15 - Malaysia doubles palm oil imports from Indonesia amid high stocks 

Malaysian palm oil imports from neighbouring producer Indonesia almost doubled in the past month and the import trend looks set to extend throughout November, despite local stocks that are near historical highs, industry sources said. Traders, analysts and importers told Reuters that high output and inventories are forcing Indonesian sellers to lower prices of the edible oil as demand remains weak, making the shipments cheaper than Malaysian oil even with shipping costs. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 15 - China's top pig farming firm to follow new lower protein feed standards 

China's top pig farming company Wens Foodstuffs Group Co Ltd will comply with new government-backed guidelines on lower protein in animal feed, a company executive said, adding however that the impact on its operations would be minimal. China's Feed Industry Association last month approved new standards for pig and chicken feeds, with lower protein levels as Beijing seeks to reduce its consumption of soymeal amid an ongoing trade spat with major soybean supplier the United States. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 15 - Ukraine soybean exports fall to record low on weak European demand 

Ukraine's soybean exports fell to a record low of 140,000 tonnes in the first two months of the 2018/19 season due to poor demand from European consumers, analyst APK-Inform said on Wednesday. "Weak demand from the EU was the main reason for the decline... only 2,200 tonnes of soybeans were shipped from Ukraine in this direction compared to 108,500 tonnes in the same period last season," the consultancy said. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 15 - Brazil prosecutors near decision on BRF corruption charges 

A sprawling Brazilian probe into alleged cheating on food safety checks by BRF SA and other firms is entering its final weeks, according to authorities and court documents, with more criminal charges potentially on their way before year-end. Prosecutors are slated to decide whether to charge BRF's former chairman Abílio Diniz and more than 40 others once a Nov. 20 deadline passes for police to gather evidence about what they say are pervasive violations of food safety protocols dating back to at least 2015. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 15 - GrainCorp profit withers in east Australia drought, challenges ahead 

GrainCorp Ltd, Australia's largest listed bulk grain handler, said on Thursday its annual underlying net profit fell 50 percent, hurt by the drought in the eastern states. The company said underlying net profit came in at A$71 million ($51.37 million) for the year to Sept. 30, down from A$141.6 million the previous year and within the company's forecast range of A$60 million to A$75 million. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 15 - Japan considers scrapping age limit on US beef imports - reports 

Japan is considering scrapping import restrictions on U.S. beef purchases that were put in place after the first case of mad cow disease in the United States in 2003, local media reported on Thursday. Both the Nikkei business daily and Mainichi newspaper said officials are discussing removing the curbs that currently only allow beef from cattle that are 30 months-old or younger. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 14 - LatAm farmers to boost soybean output amid U.S.-China trade war - analyst 

Farmers across South America are expected to produce more soybeans in 2018/19, an industry analyst said on Wednesday, as they take advantage of a trade war that has curbed U.S. exports to the world's top buyer China. Producers in Brazil are investing more resources to increase the planted area in 2018/19 to a record 36.2 million hectares, Andre Debastiani, partner at Brazil Agroconsult told an industry conference in Guangzhou. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 14 - U.S. pigs out on bacon, ribs as trade wars cut chicken demand 

Americans are losing their taste for chicken and eating more beef and pork as President Donald Trump's trade wars reduce U.S. pork exports to China and Mexico and leave cheaper bacon and ribs at home. An expansion in the number of U.S. hogs and cattle is contributing to the change in diets by boosting supplies of pork and beef. Restaurants are seizing on the increases to promote hamburgers instead of chicken, while grocery stores have featured pork. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 14 - China's 2018/19 soybean imports seen dropping to 91 mln T - Informa Economics 

China's soybean imports in 2018/19 are expected to drop to 91 million tonnes from 94 million tonnes a year ago, an official of private analytics firm Informa Economics said on Wednesday. China, which buys 60 percent of soybeans traded worldwide, is locked in a bitter trade dispute with the United States. It has curbed the country's purchases of U.S. beans. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 14 - NOPA October U.S. soy crush seen at 170.026 mln bushels - survey 

U.S. oilseed processors likely crushed the second-largest volume of soybeans ever last month as they took advantage of good margins and ample supplies of newly harvested beans, according to analysts polled ahead of a monthly National Oilseed Processors Association (NOPA) report. NOPA members, who handle about 95 percent of all soybeans processed in the United States, likely crushed 170.026 million bushels of soybeans in October, according to an average of estimates given by eight analysts in a Reuters survey. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 14 - Stung by trade wars, U.S. farmers hope for quick progress on Farm Bill 

U.S. soybean farmer Mike Schlosser does not expect President Donald Trump’s trade war with China, the single biggest headwind to his business, to end any time soon. But he is among many in farm country who expect at least some good news this year - in the form of a new Farm Bill. Congress comes back on Tuesday for the lame-duck session after Democrats in last week's mid-term elections gained control of the U.S. House of Representatives. Lawmakers have said passing the critical piece of agricultural legislation is their highest priority. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 14 - German rapeseed sowings for 2019 crop cut 18.1 pct 

Germany's winter rapeseed planted area for the 2019 harvest will be reduced by 18.1 percent on the year to around 1 million hectares, German oilseeds industry association UFOP estimated on Tuesday. A survey commissioned by UFOP of 4,411 German farmers indicated that unusually dry autumn weather following this summer's heatwave and drought meant the ground was too parched to carry out rapeseed sowings in some areas. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 14 - China seen importing farm products from Belt & Road countries - official 

China expects to import land-intensive agricultural products from Belt & Road countries, a State Council official told an industry conference on Wednesday. "These countries have high potential in producing and exporting land-intensive agricultural products," said Ye Xingqing, Director of Department of Rural Economics, Development Research Center of The State Council. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 14 - Brazil's JBS posts narrower-than-expected quarterly loss 

Brazil-based food company JBS SA on Tuesday posted a narrower than expected quarterly loss on the back of a strong performance by its Seara processed foods and Brazil beef divisions, and resilience in certain of its U.S. operations. Seara booked net sales of 4.9 billion reais last quarter, a 9 percent rise from a year earlier, as a result of higher sales prices both domestically and in export markets, JBS said in a securities filing. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 14 - Indian palm oil imports unlikely to rise despite fall in prices 

India's palm oil imports are unlikely to climb over November to January even as prices for the commodity plumb their lowest in three years, reined in by ample local supply of rival oilseeds and as a liquidity crunch hits would-be buyers, traders said. The South Asian country is the world's biggest importer of palm oil and is a key factor in international benchmark prices, which have fallen nearly a fifth so far in 2018. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 14 - China's Tangrenshen says African swine fever not found in its animal feed 

Chinese animal feed maker Tangrenshen Group said on Tuesday that tests on feed made by one of its units had ruled out the presence of the deadly African swine fever. The company said on Sunday that authorities in eastern Anhui province had reported finding what they suspected was African swine fever in feed made by its 51 percent-owned subsidiary, Bili Meiyingwei Nutrition Feedstuff. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 13 - Brazil soy exports to surpass 80 mln tonnes in 2018 on Chinese demand 

Brazilian exporters are forecast to sell a record volume of soybeans this year as China's appetite for the oilseed remains strong amid a trade war with the United States, according to traders and shipping data on Monday. Shipments from Brazil, the world's largest exporter of the oilseed, are expected to surpass 80 million tonnes in 2018, according to data from shipping agent Williams. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 13 - Iraq trade minister says studying possibility of Russian wheat imports 

Iraq, a major Middle East grain importer, said late on Monday it wanted to allow Russian origin wheat imports in its state buying tenders. Trade Minister Mohammed Hashim al-Aani said he would send representatives to Russia to study its wheat quality and its suitability for use in Iraq's massive food rationing programme. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 13 - US says India paid bigger cotton subsidies than WTO allows 

India has paid out far more in cotton subsidies than the World Trade Organization allows, with payments "vastly in excess" of what it had officially declared, the United States said in a filing to the trade watchdog on Monday. The U.S. assessment of India's market price support (MPS) for cotton said New Delhi was allowed to pay out up to 10 percent of the value of production, but the actual figure had ranged from 53 percent to 81 percent since 2010. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 13 - China and Russia in talks to allow more Russian states to export wheat to China - ambassador 

Russia and China are in talks about more Russian regions being approved to export wheat to China, Russia's ambassador to China, Andrey Ivanovich Denisov, told Reuters on Monday. Russia exported about 18,000 tonnes of wheat to China in 2017, Chinese customs data shows, only 0.4 percent of the country's total imports. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 13 - Brazil's BRF turnaround will take at least 2 years - CEO 

Investors will not see the results of a turnaround in Brazil's BRF SA, the world's largest poultry exporter, in the short term, the company's chief executive officer Pedro Parente told Reuters on Monday. "Realistically, it will not happen in less than two years," Parente said in an interview in New York, adding that one of his biggest challenges as CEO is to "manage investors' expectations." Click here to read full stories.

Nov 13 - China confirms African swine fever outbreak in Hubei province 

China's agricultural ministry said on Tuesday it had confirmed an outbreak of African swine fever in central Hubei province. The disease was found to have killed six of a combined 147 pigs on two neighbouring farms in Wuxue city, the ministry said. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 13 - Singapore's Wilmar Q3 net profit rises 11 pct 

Singapore-listed commodity trader Wilmar International Ltd on Monday posted a rise of nearly 11 percent in its third-quarter net profit, helped by stronger performance across its key businesses. The company, whose top shareholders include U.S. agricultural trader Archer Daniels Midland Co, reported a net profit of $407.4 million for the three months ended September, compared with $368.1 million a year earlier. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 12 - Funds' CBOT views seen little changed after USDA bombshell - Braun 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s monthly supply and demand report can often be mundane in November, but Thursday’s update was far from uneventful, with loads of moving parts. However, the new data did not appear to significantly change investors’ minds toward Chicago-traded grains and oilseeds. The report ultimately revealed an expected tightening of global grain supplies into mid-2019 and an expansion of soybean stocks, especially in the United States. However, the adjustment of historical data out of China made it difficult to quickly identify these trends in the grains. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 12 - Bunge sees Brazil 2019 wheat imports rising 11 pct on crop failure 

Brazil wheat imports are expected to increase 11 percent in 2019 to 7 million tonnes as the country grapples with crop failures this year, a senior manager for commodities trading firm Bunge Ltd  said on Friday. In Brazil, weather problems including rainfall during the harvest have contributed to the forecast for Brazil's 2018 wheat crop being cut to 5.3 million tonnes from the 6 million tonnes projected originally, said Edson Csipai, Bunge's manager of grain origination. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 12 - African swine fever found in animal feed raises China's contagion risk 

Major Chinese animal feed maker Tangrenshen Group reported on Sunday that feed produced by one of its units had been contaminated with African swine fever, raising fears of its spread further across the country. This is the first reported contamination of feed supplies in China and increases the concerns for pig farmers trying to avoid the disease. It also raises the economic pressure on feed manufacturers already struggling with low margins and slowing demand. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 12 - U.S. ethanol producers feeling the pinch from Trump trade war

U.S. ethanol producers drew a bleak picture of their industry in quarterly filings and analyst calls this week, detailing how the critical farm belt business has been devastated by President Donald Trump's trade war with China and biofuels management policies that they say have tilted toward oil refiners. The ethanol business had grown for years at breakneck speed but its outlook has dimmed due to Washington's aggressive protectionist stance and the administration's unpredictable management of its renewable fuel program. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 12 - Egypt's strategic wheat reserves sufficient for 4.3 months - minister 

Egypt's strategic reserves of wheat are enough to cover the country's needs for 4.3 months, the supply minister was quoted as saying on Sunday by state news agency MENA. The country has enough sugar to cover its needs for 5.3 months and enough vegetable oil for 3.3 months, Ali Moselhy said in an address in parliament. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 09 - USDA sees ballooning soy supplies as trade war roils exports

The U.S. soybean crop will be smaller than expected but stocks are forecast to rise sharply as a trade fight with China weighs heavily on exports, the U.S. Agriculture Department said on Thursday. The government also trimmed its outlook for domestic corn production in its monthly supply and demand report, with yields from the ongoing harvest coming in below expectations. Click here to read full stories

Nov 09 - Agribusiness giant ADM made buyout approach to Argentina's Molinos – sources

Top U.S. grain merchant Archer Daniels Midland Co has approached Argentine soy crusher Molinos Agro about buying the company's livestock feed and soyoil manufacturing plant, and talks may continue, three sources said. Molinos and other Argentine soy crushers have been pummeled by fallout from the U.S.-China trade policy war which has given U.S. crushers a competitive advantage. Click here to read full stories

Nov 09 - Tightening in global grain supply clouded by China, again -Braun

Agriculture analysts have gotten used to the routine of subtracting out China’s wheat stocks from the world total for a better portrayal of exportable world supply since the Asian country is a minimal participant in wheat trade. China's grain stocks have swelled in the last decade or so in a bid for food security and self-sufficiency, but this has led to the overproduction and hoarding of corn and wheat. Click here to read full stories

Nov 09 - French rapeseed area to slump 30-35 pct after drought - growers

The rapeseed area for the 2019 harvest in France is expected to drop by 30-35 percent from this year because of drought, the head of oilseed growers group FOP said on Thursday. The forecast, which would reduce the French rapeseed area to between 1 million and 1.1 million hectares, is far below estimates from the Terres Univia growers' technical centre, which had previously forecast that the area would drop to 1.5 million hectares.  Click here to read full stories

Nov 09 - Argentina biodiesel chamber: U.S. review of tariffs could revive halted exports

The U.S. decision to review its tariffs on Argentine biodiesel could mean a reversal of fortune for exporters whose shipments from the South American country have been practically nil, the biodiesel chamber of Argentina said on Thursday. The U.S. Department of Commerce announced on Wednesday there was "just cause" to review the taxes it applied at the end of 2017 to Argentine biodiesel, which cut off access to the main market for Argentina's product at the time.  Click here to read full stories

Nov 09 - U.S. agriculture coalition meets in Havana despite Trump crackdown

Representatives of U.S. agribusiness, the farming lobby and related industries opened a three-day conference in Cuba on Thursday aimed at increasing sales and cooperation with a country that the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump has repeatedly lambasted and promised to tighten sanctions on. The U.S. Agricultural Coalition for Cuba, which seeks increased trade with Cuba and the lifting of the trade embargo, is sponsoring the event. Click here to read full stories

Nov 09 - Brazil's BRF reports wider-than-expected Q3 loss in tough turnaround

Brazilian food processor BRF SA posted a wider-than-expected quarterly loss on Thursday as trade embargoes, a drop in sales volumes and higher feed prices weighed on management's efforts to turn the company around. In its second quarter after a corporate restructuring following a string of bad financial and operating results, BRF said it lost 812 million reais ($218 million). That was almost double the average loss of 443 million reais forecast by analysts, according to IBES data from Refinitiv. Click here to read full stories

Nov 08 - China sharply revises higher corn output data from past 10 years

China, the world's No. 2 corn producer, sharply revised higher its corn output data for the past 10 years, a move that should have wide repercussions for global supply and demand scenarios. The data overhaul follows last year's agricultural census, China's first in 10 years, which led the National Statistics Bureau to revise a broad swathe of data, a bureau official said on Thursday. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 08 - China Oct soybean imports jump from yr before amid worries trade war will hit supply

China's soybean imports jumped by nearly a fifth in October from a year earlier, customs data showed on Thursday, with buyers stocking up on Brazilian beans amid worries over tight supply in the fourth quarter due to the Sino-U.S. trade war. China, the world's top soybean buyer, brought in 6.92 million tonnes of the oilseed in October, up 18 percent from 5.85 million tonnes in the same month last year, according to data released by the General Administration of Customs. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 08 - Louis Dreyfus top shareholder gets finance to buy out minorities

Margarita Louis-Dreyfus, top shareholder of commodity giant Louis Dreyfus Company (LDC), said she had secured financing for a deal that requires her to buy out family minorities, a move that has created uncertainty over the firm's funding. Minority family shareholders asked in 2015 to sell 16.6 percent of LDC's holding company to Margarita Louis-Dreyfus' Akira trust in a buyout estimated at $800-$900 million.  Click here to read full stories.

 

Nov 08 - Russia keeps 2018/19 grain export forecast at 38-39 mln T

Russia's agriculture ministry on Wednesday kept its grain export forecast for 2018/19 at 38-39 million tonnes, withdrawing an earlier lower forecast given by one of its officials. Russian news agencies earlier quoted First Deputy Minister Dzhambulat Khatuov as saying the ministry had cut its grain export forecast for the 2018/19 marketing season that started on July 1 to 35 million tonnes. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 08 - Russia to start supplies of frozen poultry to China in 2018

Russia plans to start supplying frozen poultry to China by the end of 2018, the government said on Wednesday, ending several years of waiting for meat producers to gain access to the major market. Domestic producers have boosted their output since 2014 when Moscow banned most Western food imports in reaction to sanctions imposed on Russia over the annexation of Crimea from Ukraine and other factors. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 08 - Sisi's hot potato: Egyptians hit back after remarks on austerity

Egypt's President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi spoke daily at the World Youth Forum in the resort of Sharm al-Sheikh this week, touching on topics from Syria's reconstruction to religious tolerance - but it was a remark about potatoes that most stirred the pot. "Do you want to build your country and become a worthy state, or are you going to look for potatoes?" Sisi asked, after hinting that Egyptian civil servants would go without an annual wage increase this year due to increased government costs. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 08 - U.S. to review antidumping duties on Argentine biodiesel - Argentina

The U.S. Commerce Department said it would begin a review of antidumping duties it placed last year on biodiesel imported from Argentina, the Argentine Foreign Ministry said in a statement on Wednesday. U.S. trade officials had shut down the sale of Argentine biodiesel with steep tariffs after finding in late 2017 that imports from the South American country were being sold at prices well below market value in the United States. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 08 - Stalled farm bill could move fast after House win - senior Democratic lawmaker

Congress may swiftly resolve a drawn-out impasse on the U.S. Farm Bill now that Democrats are poised to retake control of the legislative body, the top Democrat on the House Agriculture Committee said on Wednesday. Collin Peterson, ranking member and presumptive new chair of committee, said passing the crucial agricultural legislation was going to be his top priority, with a deal possible as soon as next week during the lame-duck session. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 08 - China's Heilongjiang province doubles soybean subsidies to boost output

China's top grain-producing province almost doubled its 2018 subsidies for soybean growers, an official news website reported on Wednesday, as Beijing seeks ways to reduce reliance on U.S. exports of the oilseed amid a trade war with Washington. China's Heilongjiang province set 2018 soybean subsidies at 320 yuan per mu, a Chinese measure of land equal to 0.06 hectare (0.14 acre), up from last year's 174 yuan per mu, the local official media website said. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 07 - Argentina eyes soymeal export approval from China this month

Argentine soy crushing factories want to revive their business with a deal permitting them for the first time to export soymeal livestock feed to China, a pact that the government said was being hammered out this week in Beijing. The crushing plants that dot the banks of the Parana River, Argentina's main grains thoroughfare, are working at only about half their capacity due to fallout from the U.S.-China trade war. The government hopes to announce the soymeal-to-China agreement at the G20 meeting in Buenos Aires later this month, the head of the local grains exporting chamber said on Tuesday. Click here to read full stories

Nov 07 - USDA may soon shed more light on U.S.-China soy trade -Braun

One of the biggest disconnects in the oilseed market today is the paltry volume of soybeans shipped from the United States in recent weeks versus the relatively lofty export predictions from the U.S. government. The reason U.S. soybean exports are lagging so badly is simple: top customer China slapped heavy tariffs on the U.S. product earlier this year, effectively banning its entry into the East Asian country. Click here to read full stories

Nov 07 - Germany seeking end date for glyphosate use - minister

Germany plans new conditions for pesticide approval and will seek an end date for the use of glyphosate-based weed killers, Environment Minister Svenja Schulze said on Tuesday. Weed killers using glyphosate, made by Bayer AG's Monsanto, are the subject of a heated debate in Europe and the United States over whether they cause cancer. Click here to read full stories

Nov 07 - Brazil biodiesel group seeks 10-pct retention on soy export earnings

Ubrabio, a Brazilian association of biodiesel producers, presented on Tuesday a proposal for the government to retain 10 percent of earnings from soybean exports, in a program to help the local soybean crushing industry. The money collected would be distributed among crushers proportionately to their sales of soymeal, to help them compete in international markets and boost their capacity to buy beans in the domestic market, competing with exporters. Click here to read full stories

Nov 07 - Philippines farm output drops for first time in 7 quarters

The Philippines' July-September agricultural production dropped for the first time in seven quarters, dented by lower output of crops and fisheries, data from the statistics agency showed on Wednesday. Farm output fell 0.8 percent in the third quarter from a year earlier, the Philippine Statistics Authority said, with the output of crops, which accounts for nearly half of total agricultural production, contracting 3.6 percent. Click here to read full stories

Nov 07 - Ghana launches commodity exchange for agricultural products

Ghana launched a commodity exchange for agricultural products, the first in West Africa, on Tuesday in efforts to guarantee market access for farmers and boost their income, President Nana Akufo Addo said. He said the exchange would benefit around 1 million Ghanaian farmers by securing storage for their harvest over the next 18 months and aims to substantially reduce post-harvest losses. Click here to read full stories

Nov 07 - Ukraine oilseed meal exports to jump in 2018/19 - consultancy

Ukraine is likely to increase its exports of oilseed meal with a record 7 percent share in global exports, agribusiness consulting agency APK-Inform said on Wednesday. The consultancy said the export of sunflower meal could rise to 4.7 million tonnes in the 2018/19 September-August season, 11 percent more than in 2017/18. Click here to read full stories

Nov 07 - Canada's Nutrien eyeing expansion of nitrogen plants as prices climb

Nutrien Ltd, the world's biggest crop nutrient producer by capacity, is looking at expanding several nitrogen fertilizer plants in North America due to rising prices, Chief Executive Chuck Magro said on Tuesday. Nitrogen prices have climbed as China's shutdown of coal-fired plants and rising European costs of natural gas, a key ingredient in fertilizer production, have curbed capacity outside North America. Click here to read full stories

Nov 07 - Turkey may import more meat to cut down prices, Erdogan says

Turkey will import more meat to bring down surging prices if necessary, President Tayyip Erdogan said on Tuesday, after food prices helped push inflation to a 15-year high in October. "I think the continued rise in meat prices is due to high demand. However, if necessary, we will import without thinking of the current account deficit to bring down these prices and balance the market," Erdogan said. Click here to read full stories

Nov 06 - Toxin in U.S. corn harvest poses latest headache for farmers

North American farmers are finding increased levels of a plant toxin known as vomitoxin in this year's corn harvest, adding insult to injury for growers already suffering as the U.S.-China trade war hurts soybean exports and crop prices. Vomitoxin sickens livestock and can also make humans and pets fall ill, and grain buyers can reject cargoes or fine farmers for shipments that contain it. Click here to read full stories

Nov 06 - Brazil in talks to boost soymeal exports to China

Brazil's soy processing executives are in talks with Chinese government officials over ways to increase soymeal exports to the Asian nation, industry group Abiove said on Monday. China already buys around 80 percent of Brazilian soybean exports. According to official data, Brazil exported 55 million tonnes of soybeans to China from January to September, while sales of soymeal - crushed soybeans used for animal feed - were 209,000 tonnes. Click here to read full stories

Nov 06 - Crop Watch: Corn harvest picked up pace in Western Belt - Braun

The U.S. Crop Watch farmers reported another busy week of harvesting, especially in the Western Corn Belt. As of Sunday, the corn harvest was notably lagging normal pace in the North Dakota and Nebraska locations, but otherwise the producers report that three-fourths or more of the area corn is done. The soybean harvest is at least 90 percent completed around all eight Crop Watch locations except for Kansas, which suffered heavy delays last month on record rainfall. Click here to read full stories

Nov 06 - Vietnam, Thailand skip Philippines' 203,000 T rice tender

Major rice exporters Thailand and Vietnam did not submit offers at a Philippines import tender for the supply of 203,000 tonnes of the grain, citing stricter terms, Philippine officials said on Tuesday. The tender by one of the world's top rice importers was held to meet unfilled orders after a tender on Oct. 18 for 250,000 tonnes of rice by Manila's state-owned National Food Authority (NFA) secured only 47,000 tonnes due to high offer prices. Click here to read full stories

Nov 06 - China battles to control African swine fever as it reports 50th case

China confirmed a new case of African swine fever on Monday, in southern Hunan province, marking the 50th outbreak of the highly contagious disease in the world's top pork producer. The disease, which can be deadly for pigs and has no vaccine, has reached 14 provinces and municipalities in China since it was first detected in early August. Most of the recent cases have been in the south, which has the country's highest pork consumption per capita. Click here to read full stories

Nov 06 - U.S. corn harvest seen 77 pct done, soy harvest 84 pct - poll

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's weekly crop progress report should show the U.S. corn harvest 77 percent complete and the soybean harvest 84 percent complete, according to the average estimate from 11 analysts polled by Reuters on Monday. The USDA plans to release its weekly update at 3 p.m. CST (2100 GMT) on Monday. Click here to read full stories

Nov 06 - Saudi Arabia buys 1.02 mln T of feed barley in big sale by Glencore

Saudi Arabia, the world's largest feed barley buyer, said on Monday it bought 1.02 million tonnes of the grain in an international tender, predominantly from Glencore. The barley was purchased at an average price of $266.83 per tonne, cost and freight, and the offered origins were from the European Union, Australia, the Black Sea, and North and South America, excluding Canada, state grain buyer, the Saudi Grains Organization (SAGO), said in a statement. Click here to read full stories

Nov 06 - France bans crop pesticide metam sodium after people fall ill

France's health safety watchdog Anses ordered a ban on products containing metam sodium, widely used in vegetable farming, on Monday after several people fell ill, saying it poses a risk to human health and the environment. The discovery of respiratory intoxications in recent weeks among farmers or farm neighbours following the use of metam sodium-based products in western France had prompted the government to temporarily ban its use pending an Anses opinion. Click here to read full stories

Nov 05 - As China soy demand wavers, U.S. farmers turn back to grains

Since the mid-2000s, North Dakota farmer Paul Thomas has planted more of his land with soybeans as China's demand for the oilseed grew. The shift culminated this year when Thomas planted 1,600 of his 5,000 acres with soybeans, the most ever. But Thomas and many farmers like him plan to return to the old U.S. farm belt staples in 2019: corn and wheat. The change will reverse a trend that saw U.S. farmers plant more acreage this year with soybeans than corn for the first time in 35 years. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 05 - U.S. farmers to seed more corn for 2019/20, less soy - USDA

U.S. farmers are likely to expand plantings of both corn and wheat while reducing soybean and cotton seedings for the upcoming marketing year, the U.S. Agriculture Department said on Friday. The USDA's Office of the Chief Economist forecast that farmers will seed 92.0 million acres of corn in the 2019/20 crop year, up from 89.1 million for 2018/19. For soybeans, acreage will fall to 82.5 million acres, from 89.1 million. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 05 - Funds sour on CBOT grains, soy but renew interest late in week - Braun

Competitiveness on the global grain market and lousy export demand for U.S. soybeans led to speculative selling across the board through Oct. 30 in Chicago-traded grain and oilseed futures, but there was a resurgence of optimism late last week. Investors remained bullish in CBOT corn for the third week in a row, but with caution as U.S. supply builds amid the ongoing harvest. Overseas demand for U.S. corn has also faced some headwinds in recent weeks from South American and Black Sea rivals. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 05 - Malaysia Oct palm oil stocks seen rising to 3-year high

Malaysia's palm oil stocks at end-October are forecast to rise to the highest in three years at nearly 3 million tonnes amid a seasonal rise in output and a slip in export demand, according to a Reuters survey. Inventories are expected to climb for a fifth straight month, rising 14.1 percent from September to 2.90 million tonnes, based on the median estimate of eight planters, traders and analysts. That would be the highest level since November 2015, and the sharpest monthly gain in a year.  Click here to read full stories.

Nov 05 - USDA, farm businesses head to South Korea in trade mission

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) said on Friday it will lead a trade delegation of farm organizations and businesses to South Korea, in an apparent effort to boost opportunities for U.S. farmers in a key U.S. export market. The planned visit, scheduled for Nov. 5-8, comes after the United States and South Korea signed a revised free trade agreement on Sept. 24 and at a time when American farmers have been struggling due to the absence of Chinese buyers, their largest export market, due to a trade war between Washington and Beijing. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 02 - Bloomberg Commodity Index to cut weightings for livestock, softs 

Bloomberg adjusted the weightings for its Bloomberg Commodity Index for 2019, cutting its weighting for the livestock and soft commodity sectors, the company said in a statement dated Wednesday. It cut its weighting for the livestock sector to 5.94 percent in 2019 from 6.39 percent this year, and the softs sector to 7.05 percent from 7.60 percent. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 02 - Trump’s trade war looms over divided U.S. farm belt ahead of vote

Chuck Wirtz voted for Donald Trump in the 2016 election, inspired by the then-political outsider, but the veteran Iowa hog farmer now has buyer's remorse as the U.S. Republican president's trade policy exacts a heavy toll on his business. Wirtz, 56, estimates the tariffs resulting from the U.S. trade war with China and other nations have cost him $200,000 this year and forced the liquidation of part of his farm in northwestern Iowa. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 02 - China soymeal futures fall most in almost six years after Trump-Xi phone call 

China's most actively traded soymeal futures fell by the maximum 5 percent at the market open on Friday, its biggest daily drop in almost six years, as traders reacted to positive comments after a phone call between U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping. Soy traded on the Dalian Commodity Exchange fell to 3,105 yuan ($447.99) a tonne, a two-month low, in its biggest daily decline since February 2013, surprising some market observers. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 02 - China's customs data release shows Sept soybean imports from Brazil jump 

China's purchases of Brazilian soybeans in September jumped 28 percent from the prior year, data from the General Administration of Customs showed on Thursday, as buyers stocked up ahead of an expected shortfall in the fourth quarter. This is the first time that China has provided data on the country of origin for its commodity imports since the month of March. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 02 - Brazil's Bolsonaro might keep agriculture, environment ministries apart 

Brazil's President-elect Jair Bolsonaro said on Thursday his future administration may keep the agriculture and the environment ministries separate, backtracking from a proposal to combine the two that had alarmed environmentalists. "We had an idea to combine the ministries but it seems both will remain separate, with one person focusing on environment protection," he said during an interview with Catholic TV stations. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 02 - U.S.-China trade dispute may benefit palm oil demand - analyst Fry

Palm oil will see some benefit from the U.S.-China trade war as China will reduce supplies of soybean for its vegetable oil processing industry, said industry analyst James Fry on Thursday. Soybeans from the United States entering China have been subject to additional tariffs of 25 percent since July as Beijing retaliated in response to U.S. duties on Chinese goods. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 02 - White farmer's role highlights South Africa's land reform challenge

Earlier this year, Nick Serfontein wrote an open letter to South African President Cyril Ramaphosa asking him to take the views of white farmers on board as the government considers expropriating land without compensation to reduce rural poverty. Now Serfontein sits on a 10-person board advising the president where to go next, based on what he says is his own experience of trying to help black farmers who do not own land. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 01 - U.S. soybean cargo heading to China switches destination amid trade row 

A vessel carrying soybeans from the United States to China changed its destination to South Korea on Thursday, shipping data showed, amid a trade war that has decimated U.S. shipments of the commodity to the world's top oilseed importer. The Star Laura, carrying 36,000 tonnes of American soybeans loaded in Seattle in late September, was due to arrive in the eastern Chinese port of Qingdao on Wednesday, according to shipping data on Refinitiv Eikon. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 01 - Bunge expands board under activist pressure, shares drop 

Bunge Ltd said it will add four directors to its board and create a strategic review committee to explore options for the global grains trader, including a sale of the company, bowing to pressure from activist investors D.E. Shaw and Continental Grain Co. The White Plains, New York-based agribusiness company also reported a stronger-than-expected third-quarter profit, but lowered its 2018 earnings outlook by $100 million to $1.2 billion with cuts to guidance in two of its four business segments. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 01 - USDA September soybean crush seen at 171.0 million bushels 

U.S. soybean crushings in September likely totaled 5.131 million short tons, or 171.0 million bushels, according to the average forecast of nine analysts surveyed by Reuters ahead of a monthly U.S. Department of Agriculture report. Estimates ranged from 170.2 million to 171.6 million bushels, with a median of 171.1 million bushels. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 01 - Russia to resume some beef and pork imports from Brazil 

Russia's agriculture safety watchdog said on Wednesday it would allow imports of beef and pork from nine Brazilian plants to resume from Thursday, ending an 11-month ban triggered by food safety concerns. Russia's Rosselkhoznadzor had placed temporary restrictions on imports of pork and beef products from Brazil in December 2017 after it said it found ractopamine in some shipments, a feed additive that is permitted in Brazil but banned in Russia. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 01 - EPA adds restrictions to use of Bayer, BASF weed killer linked to crop damage 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said on Wednesday it would allow farmers to spray a controversial weed killer made by Bayer AG's Monsanto Co and BASF SE for two more years, with additional restrictions on use. The agency said the herbicide, called dicamba, is an important tool for controlling weeds in crop fields. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 01 - China's WH Group seeks proof African swine fever found in subsidiary's sausage 

WH Group, China's top pork processor, said on Thursday it was trying to verify a Taiwan government statement that the African swine fever virus was found in a sausage made by a subsidiary that was brought to the island by a traveller. The findings in Taiwan suggests that pigs carrying the disease are still being slaughtered and processed in China. South Korea and Japan have also reported finding processed meat products imported from China containing the disease.  Click here to read full stories.

Nov 01 - Graincorp to cut jobs in eastern Australia unit because of drought 

Graincorp said on Thursday it planned to cut jobs at its eastern Australia grains unit after a devastating drought in the area severely hampered the region's grain harvest. Australia's biggest listed bulk grain handler said in a statement it would streamline operations and reduce management layers to cut costs. Click here to read full stories.

Nov 01 - Indonesia considers reducing its levy on palm oil exports 

Indonesia is considering reducing its levy on palm oil exports, a government minister said on Thursday, as the nation pushes to maintain its position in international markets for the commodity. Indonesia's coordinating minister for economic affairs, Darmin Nasution, said during a speech at an industry conference in Indonesia that an "adjustment" to the levy was among steps to be taken by the government, although he later told reporters that this was still being discussed. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 31 - Bunge finalizing agreements with investors, to consider sale - sources 

Bunge Ltd is finalizing agreements with activist investors D.E. Shaw and Co and Continental Grain Co to add four directors to its board and set up a committee to explore a sale, two sources familiar with the matter said on Tuesday. The agreement was first reported by the Wall Street Journal, which earlier this month said D.E. Shaw had raised its stake in the grain trader and was working with Continental Grain to make operational improvements at the company. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 31 - U.S. grain handler Andersons eyes growth after Lansing deal 

Two years after fending off a hostile takeover attempt, U.S. grain handler The Andersons Inc is expanding its commodity shipping and ethanol businesses and eyeing small- to mid-sized acquisitions to stay profitable during a global supply glut that has hurt U.S. farmers. The Andersons this month said it was purchasing the remaining 67.5 percent stake in Lansing Trade Group LLC that the company did not already own by paying $175 million in cash, assuming $166 million in long-term debt and issuing stock in its largest-ever acquisition. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 31 - CoreCommodity's De Chiara says bull cycle in commods starting 

Commodities from energy to metals and agriculture are in the early stages of a strong upward move, CoreCommodity LLC portfolio manager Adam De Chiara said on Tuesday, as interest rates start to rise and long-standing supply gluts start to dwindle. De Chiara, co-founder of the $4.2 billion CoreCommodity Management LLC, a privately owned investment manager, said global economic growth is the main reason he expects a sustained rally in energy markets including crude oil and natural gas, along with soft commodities like coffee and sugar. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 31 - Less meat, more pasta: how the economic crisis is changing Argentina's diet 

Like most Argentines, Sabrina Pozo used to eat meat several times a week. But soaring inflation and the collapse of Argentina's currency, the peso, since April have forced her to abruptly change her diet. "My habits changed a lot. Before, maybe I made beef Milanese (breaded cutlet) once a week and roast beef once a week," Pozo, 36, said. Click here to read full stories. 

Oct 31 - Moderate deliveries expected against CBOT Nov soybean futures 

Soybean deliveries against Chicago Board of Trade November futures should be moderate on Wednesday, which is first notice day, traders and analysts said on Tuesday, citing weak cash values. Analysts' estimates of CBOT November soybean deliveries on first notice day ranged mostly from 200 to 500 contracts, although some analysts said deliveries could reach 1,000 contracts. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 31 - China to buy more vegoils and meals in coming weeks - Oil World 

China is likely to buy a wider range of processed vegetable oils and animal feed meals on global markets in the coming weeks as the U.S./China trade war continues to reduce supplies of soybeans for China’s oilseeds processing industry, Hamburg-based oilseeds analysts Oil World said on Tuesday. “China is likely to become a more active buyer of vegetable oils and oilmeals on the world market to partly compensate reduced domestic production resulting from a smaller soybean crush,” Oil World said in its closely-watched weekly newsletter. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 31 - Cargill's Dines named new CFO; Smits takes new role in Asia 

Cargill Inc said on Tuesday that David Dines, the head of its risk management business, would replace Chief Financial Officer Marcel Smits on Dec. 1 as part of a handful of changes in the grain trader's executive team. The company said Smits will be moving into a new role as the head of Cargill Asia Pacific - a region that Cargill says is a key focus of its growth going forward. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 30 - Crop Watch: Big week for soybean harvest across the Corn Belt - Karen Braun 

U.S. farmers took advantage of favorable weather last week with many areas making huge strides in harvest progress, according to ground reports from the eight Crop Watch producers. As in the previous week, there was a large focus on soybeans, but to an even greater extent than in the previous week. As of Sunday, the local soybean harvest is predicted to range from 60 percent complete to fully complete across the eight Crop Watch areas. Corn progress is between 50 and 95 percent complete in six of the locations, but northeast Nebraska and east central North Dakota are further behind. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 30 - Russian wheat export prices fall due to competition with U.S. wheat

Russian wheat export prices fell last week due to intensified competition with U.S. wheat for supplies to Egypt, the world's largest importer and the top buyer of Russian wheat, analysts said on Monday. Chicago wheat prices, the global benchmark, had been falling last week until Friday when they jumped as U.S. wheat became one of the winning origins - for the first time in many months - at a tender of GASC, Egypt's state buyer. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 30 - Brazil poised for bumper soybean crop as planting advances – Reuters poll 

Brazilian farmers are likely to harvest another record volume of soybeans in the 2018/19 season, as good weather fuels expectations of yet another bumper crop in the world's largest exporter of the oilseed, a Reuters poll showed on Monday. Brazilian producers will harvest 120.39 million tonnes of soybeans in the season that began in September, a rise of 0.9 percent compared with the previous cycle, according to the average of 12 estimates collected by Reuters. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 30 - UAE's strategic Fujairah grain silos 60 pct full 

The United Arab Emirates' strategic grain silos at the port of Fujairah, which can be reached without passing through the Strait of Hormuz, are 50 to 60 percent full on average, the managing director of the country's state Food Security Center said. In response to U.S. sanctions, Iran in July threatened to block all exports through the strait, a vital Gulf oil export and food import route, a similar threat to the one it made in 2012 as tensions rose with the West over Tehran's disputed nuclear programme. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 30 - Brazil's Bolsonaro backs ethanol industry, pledges partnership 

President-elect Jair Bolsonaro backed Brazil's ethanol industry and pledged to be a partner of the biofuel sector, according to remarks aired on Monday during an international sugar conference in Sao Paulo. Right-wing Bolsonaro, who beat leftist Fernando Haddad in a run-off vote on Sunday, said in a video that he would like to see Brazil retake global leadership in ethanol production, which it lost to the United States some years ago. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 30 - China soymeal, rapemeal futures fall on government plan, weaker demand 

China's soymeal futures fell more than 1.8 percent on Tuesday, as the market digested news of a government plan to reduce protein levels in animal feed. The plan, issued late on Friday, could see consumption of soybeans in China fall by 14 million tonnes a year, the agriculture ministry said, or about 13 percent. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 30 - U.S. agriculture chief says no plan to extend farm aid to offset tariffs 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is not planning to extend an up to $12 billion aid package for farmers into 2019, Secretary Sonny Perdue said on Monday, to mitigate farmer losses due to the imposition of tariffs on American exports. "Farmers are very resilient and adept in making their planning and marketing decisions based on the current market," Perdue told reporters on the sidelines of an event in Washington. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 30 - Bulgaria detects bird flu at two duck farms 

Bulgaria's food safety agency reported an outbreak of the virulent bird flu virus on Monday on two duck farms in southern Bulgaria. All ducks in the farms in the village of Malevo and the village of Garvanovo will be culled to prevent the spread of the disease, which was confirmed by laboratory tests, the agency said in a statement, without specifying which strain of bird flu was involved. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 29 - China says new animal feed standards will cut chunk out of appetite for soy 

New standards on the protein content of animal feed in China will cut its annual consumption of soybeans by 14 million tonnes, the government said late last week, marking a drop of about 13 percent from the last crop year in the world's top buyer of the oilseed. The nation has been pursuing multiple ways to reduce its consumption of feed ingredient soymeal, made from soybeans, amid a festering trade war with the United States, its No.2 supplier of beans. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 29 - Hog industry worldwide getting slaughtered in trade war 

Ken Maschhoff, chairman of the largest U.S. family-owned pork producer, has watched profits fall as trade tensions rise between the United States and China. His company, The Maschhoffs, has halted U.S. projects worth up to $30 million and may move some operations overseas. Investing in domestic operations now would be “ludicrous" as China and others retaliate against U.S. agricultural goods, Maschhoff said from the firm’s Carlyle, Illinois headquarters. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 29 - Trade retaliations against the U.S. hit Canada farmers, too 

The United States' trade wars have allowed Canada's agriculture industry to pump up sales of soybeans and wheat to China, and pork to Mexico. But the same tariff battles are undermining commodity prices and eating into Canadian farmers' profit margins even as they grab more market share. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 29 - Egypt's GASC says buys 470,000 T of wheat in tender for Dec. 11-20 delivery 

Egypt's state grains buyer, the General Authority for Supply Commodities (GASC), said on Friday it has bought 470,000 tonnes of wheat in an international purchase tender. GASC bought 350,000 tonnes of Russian wheat, 60,000 tonnes of Ukrainian wheat and 60,000 tonnes of U.S. wheat for delivery Dec. 11-20. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 29 - Russia raises wheat exports estimate, risk of curbs eases

Russian Agriculture Minister Dmitry Patrushev raised the country's 2018/19 wheat export estimate at his Friday meeting with major traders, who interpreted it as another sign of an easing risk of export curbs. Russian officials along with their counterparts in Ukraine, another major Black Sea wheat exporter, are closely monitoring the activity of main exporters for this marketing season due to a lower crop. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 29 - France triggers disaster fund for drought-hit farmers 

France, Europe's biggest grain producer, announced aid on Friday for farmers hit by the severe drought that has afflicted the country since the summer, along with much of northern Europe. The government will tap an agricultural disaster fund for farmers as part of a broader aid package unveiled by Agriculture Minister Didier Guillaume during a visit to eastern France, where he met grain and livestock producers. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 24 - Canadian farmers race to reap wheat while sun shines, but damage done 

Sunny skies may allow Canadian farmers to swiftly make up for harvest delays this week, wrapping up a nightmarish season for some. But while the harvest is finally on its way in the third-biggest wheat-exporting country, weather troubles look to dent farm incomes due to quality problems that are also forcing some millers to scrounge for supplies. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 24 - U.S. soy trade may be thinner than meets the eye in China's absence -Braun 

October is typically the busiest month of the year for U.S. soybean shippers, and in recent years, an average of 76 percent of October’s exports head to China, the largest share of any month. The data will look vastly different this month, though, as the ongoing trade war between the world’s two largest economies has virtually halted all sales and shipments of U.S. soybeans to the East Asian country. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 24 - China's NE farming belt accused of livestock pollution failures 

Waste from poultry and livestock farms has contaminated land and water supplies in China's northeast farm province of Heilongjiang due to inadequate and poorly run treatment facilities, a government review said on Wednesday. Just 47 percent of the province's large-scale poultry and livestock farms had installed proper waste treatment facilities, and many weren't running those facilities correctly, the report published by the Ministry of Ecology and Environment said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 24 - Russia's Agriculture Ministry ups forecast for 2018 grain crop - TASS 

Russia's agriculture ministry has raised its forecast for the country's 2018 grain crop to 109 million tonnes from a previously expected 106 million tonnes due to favourable weather for harvesting in Siberia, the minister, Dmitry Patrushev, was quoted as saying by the TASS news agency. A crop of 109 million tonnes would leave between 38 million and 39 million tonnes of grain available for exports, Patrushev added on Tuesday. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 24 - China's Guangdong province bans transport of live hogs as swine fever spreads 

China's southern Guangdong province on Tuesday banned the transport of live hogs to other parts of the country after two outbreaks of deadly African swine fever were reported in a neighbouring area. Beijing has prohibited the transport of pigs from any provinces that have reported African swine fever cases, as well as from neighbouring regions.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 24 - Thailand forecasts 2019 rice exports at 10-11 mln tonnes 

Thailand expects to export between 10 million and 11 million tonnes of rice in 2019, the country's commerce ministry said on Wednesday. Thai rice exports in the current year, meanwhile, will meet the country's target of 11 million tonnes, the ministry said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 24 - Iowa lawmaker urges EPA to speed up rule expanding ethanol sales 

Republican Senator Chuck Grassley said on Tuesday that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency must act quickly to allow year-round sales of higher ethanol gasoline blends if President Donald Trump aims to keep a campaign promise to corn farmers. Trump announced during a trip to Iowa this month his intention to lift the summertime ban on sales of so-called E15 gasoline to help corn growers stung by slumping prices. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 24 - Ukraine 2018 grain harvest, sowing almost complete - ministry 

Ukraine's agriculture ministry announced on Tuesday the following data on its 2018 harvest and sowing. Farmers in Ukraine had harvested 54.5 million tonnes of grain as of Tuesday, with a yield of 4.19 tonnes per hectare. By the same date last year Ukraine had harvested 48.7 million tonnes. Farmers have threshed 13 million hectares of grains out of a total area of 14.8 million hectares. Farmers have harvested 19.5 million tonnes of corn from 2.9 million hectares, 62 percent of the sown area. The yield averaged 6.82 tonnes per hectare. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 24 - S.African pension fund buys majority stake in Africa's biggest cattle firm 

South Africa's state pension fund and a local black investment firm have bought a majority stake in Africa's biggest cattle company for 5.2 billion rand ($360 million). The Public Investment Corp. (PIC), Africa's largest investment fund and the biggest investor in South Africa's economy, said on Tuesday it had bought a majority share in Karan Beef alongside Pelo Agricultural Ventures, a black-owned agriculture investment firm. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 23 - China September sorghum imports down 77 pct on year at 90,000 T - customs 

China's imports of sorghum in September fell 76.9 percent from the year before to 90,000 tonnes, customs data showed on Tuesday, hit by steep Chinese tariffs on imports of the grain from the United States. Corn imports for the month came to 40,000 tonnes, down 83.4 percent on-year and the lowest volumes since November 2016, the data also showed. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 23 - Dry weather threatens next EU rapeseed harvest - crop monitor 

Persistent dry weather is threatening to curb next year's rapeseed harvest in the European Union, after farmers were unable to sow some crops while many plants are struggling to develop before winter, the EU's crop monitoring service said. Low rainfall and warm temperatures in September and early October exacerbated a summer drought in parts of Europe during the sowing period for rapeseed, the MARS service said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 23 - U.S. judge affirms Monsanto weed-killer verdict, slashes damages 

A U.S. judge on Monday affirmed a verdict against Bayer AG unit Monsanto that found its glyphosate-based weed-killers responsible for a man’s terminal cancer, but said the $250 million punitive damages portion of the award had to be reduced. According to a ruling in San Francisco's Superior Court of California, Judge Suzanne Bolanos said she would slash the punitive damages award to $39 million if lawyers for school groundskeeper Dewayne Johnson agreed. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 23 - China drops ban on rapeseed meal from India 

China has dropped a years-long ban on rapeseed meal imports from India as the government seeks to diversify sources of protein used in animal feed, the customs administration said on Monday. Rapeseed meal shipments from India can resume from Monday if they meet certain inspection and quarantine requirements, the General Administration of Customs said on its website. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 23 - U.S. farmers, government fight risk of African swine fever 

U.S. hog farmers are ramping up safety procedures and leaving animal-feed ingredients imported from China in storage in an attempt to keep out a highly contagious swine disease that is sweeping through Asia and Europe. U.S. government officials said in interviews on Friday they are also increasing their ability to test for the disease, African swine fever, and drawing up plans to respond quickly if a case is identified. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 23 - Crop Watch: Better weather boosts harvest in Western Corn Belt -Braun 

It was a busy week for producers across the U.S. Corn Belt as favorable weather conditions finally allowed harvest progress to pick up speed after being delayed by frequent, soaking rains. For the growers of Crop Watch 2018, the focus was largely on beans. Three of the 16 Crop Watch fields were harvested in the week ended Oct. 21: soybeans in Minnesota, Kansas, and Indiana. Both Nebraska fields were in progress as of late Sunday. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 22 - Brazil soy planting advances to 34 pct of area - consultancy 

Soy planting by Brazilian farmers for the 2018-19 season progressed to 34 percent of the expected area this week, way ahead of seeding at the same stage last year as favorable weather in most regions speeded up field work. An AgRural consultancy weekly report on Friday said overall soy planting in Brazil advanced 14 percentage points from the previous week. For comparison, at this time last year planting was at 20 percent of the area. The five-year average is 18 percent. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 22 - Spike in big U.S. farm loans may add risk to ag banks - KC Fed 

A sharp jump in U.S. farmers seeking operating and equipment loans of at least $1 million fueled a spike in agricultural lending in the third quarter of 2018, as trade worries added to economic strain in the farm sector, the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City said on Friday. The increase in the size of loans also boosted the share of agricultural lending at large banks, adding potential risk to their loan portfolios as lenders are concerned about the longer-term impact of the U.S.-China trade war on their farmer customers, said Nathan Kauffman, the bank's lead economist. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 22 - China finds first cases of African Swine Fever in country's south 

China's three-month old outbreak of African Swine Fever has spread for the first time to the country's south, its major pork-consuming region, after authorities on Sunday reported two cases in southwest Yunnan province. The news comes as China enters its peak pig production period ahead of the country's most important festival, the New Year holiday, which will be held in early February 2019. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 22 - Ukraine ups 2018 grain crop forecast to 64 mln T - minister 

Ukraine's agriculture ministry has increased its forecast for the 2018 grain harvest to 64 million tonnes from the previous estimate of 63.1 million tonnes, acting minister Maxym Martyniuk said on Saturday. He said a higher than expected harvest of corn was the reason for the new forecast. A higher harvest would allow Ukraine to export 42.5 million tonnes of grain this season versus 39.4 million tonnes a season earlier, he said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 22 - EU clear to start talks to increase U.S. beef imports 

European Union countries agreed on Friday to allow negotiations to start with Washington on increasing U.S. beef imports into Europe, in a move that could ease transatlantic trade tensions. The Commission, which negotiates on behalf of the 28 EU nations, said it would open formal talks in the coming days on increasing the United State's share of an existing 45,000-tonne quota. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 22 - Brazil's BRF says cooperating with authorities in food safety probe 

Brazil's BRF SA the world's largest chicken exporter, said on Friday it has been cooperating with authorities handling a probe into whether it colluded with health officials to evade food safety checks, lifting its shares 1 percent in early trading. Reuters reported exclusively on Sept. 12 that federal prosecutors leading the probe were seeking cooperation from the firms involved in return for more lenient penalties. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 22 - Morocco to suspend customs duty on soft wheat in Nov-Dec period 

Morocco will suspend customs duty on soft wheat from Nov. 1 until Dec. 31 and will impose a 30 percent duty starting on Jan. 1, 2019, the government's spokesperson said on Friday. On Thursday, spokesman Mustapha El Khalfi told a news conference that the government council decided to cut duties on soft wheat to 30 percent from Nov. 1 from 135 percent currently. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 22 - India's groundnut output seen down 29 pct on scanty rains - trade body 

India's groundnut output from summer-sown crop is likely to fall 29.2 percent from a year ago to 3.74 million tonnes as scanty rainfall hit yields in the top producing western state of Gujarat, a leading trade body said on Monday. The drop in output could force the world's biggest edible oil importer to raise overseas purchases in the 2018/19 marketing year starting from Nov. 1. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 22 - Trump backs water projects in U.S. West as election nears 

President Donald Trump on Friday threw his support behind speeding up water projects for agriculture and hydropower in the arid U.S. West, a move aimed to help build support for Republicans in tight congressional races in next month's midterm elections. Trump signed a presidential memorandum that directs Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to "reduce regulatory burdens" and expedite environmental reviews for projects in the West that provide water for farmers and power generation. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 19 - China has ample soybean supplies, big price moves unlikely - ag ministry 

China has ample supplies of soybeans and significant price fluctuations are unlikely, a senior agriculture ministry official said on Friday. Domestic soybean planting acreage has increased and China is set for a bumper harvest, supported by government subsidies and crop rotation policies, Tang Ke of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs told a press briefing. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 19 - Argentina transport union announces strike; could impact grain shipments 

Argentina's transportation union announced late on Wednesday night that it would go on strike next week to call for an increase in hauling rates, in a move that could disrupt the nation's grain shipments. More than 80 percent of the country's agriculture production is shipped by truck to ports. As a result, the strike could also impact some port activity, although it is currently the low season for grains. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 19 - DowDuPont to take $4.6 bln charge in agriculture unit 

DowDuPont Inc said on Thursday it would write down the value of its agriculture business by $4.6 billion when it reports third-quarter results, as global seed makers face shifts in demand linked to the U.S.-China trade war. The charge sent DowDuPont shares down as much as 6 percent in extended trading. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 19 - Egypt's GASC announces first rice purchasing tender for 2018 

Egypt's state grain buyer, the General Authority for Supply Commodities (GASC), said on Thursday it was seeking cargoes of 25,000 tonnes of rice, plus or minus 5 percent, in an international purchasing tender. GASC said it was seeking short or medium grain milled white rice of any origin, with 10-12 percent broken parts. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 19 - China says hog prices to rise ahead of Lunar New Year amid swine fever outbreaks 

China's hog prices are set to rise ahead of the Lunar New Year holiday in February as outbreaks of African swine fever hit supply, the country's agriculture ministry said on Friday. The world's top pork producer has been grappling with the rapid spread of the disease, which can be deadly to pigs but is not harmful to humans. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 19 - EPA chief says agency can expand ethanol sales without Congress 

The Environmental Protection Agency can allow sales of higher-ethanol blends of gasoline year-round without Congress, its acting administrator said on Thursday, adding that the oil industry should drop its threat of a lawsuit to halt the move. President Donald Trump announced last week he was directing the EPA to lift the summertime ban on sales of so-called E15 to help farmers suffering from slumping commodity prices. The oil industry said the move would violate the nation's biofuel policy and threatened to sue to block it. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 19 - Brazil court denies Monsanto bid to halt seed licensing to bankrupt firm 

A Brazilian appeals court denied a request this month by Monsanto's local unit to suspend licensing of its popular Intacta soy seed technology to privately owned seed maker Sementes Talismã, according to a ruling seen by Reuters. Monsanto sought to suspend the licensing of the genetically modified seed technology after Talismã filed for bankruptcy protection in January, one of the seed maker's lawyers, Daniel Amaral of DASA Advogados in São Paulo, said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 19 - U.S. blocks pork from Poland over African swine fever 

The United States suspended imports of pork from Poland on Thursday over an outbreak of the highly contagious hog disease African swine fever in that country. African swine fever has spread rapidly in eastern Europe and China, the world's largest pork producer, where new cases are appearing and the disease is traveling far distances.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 19 - Scottish government identifies case of mad cow disease

Scotland's government said on Thursday that a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease, had been discovered on a farm in Aberdeenshire, the first in Britain since 2015. A quarantine area has been put in place around the farm while inspectors try to identify the origin of the disease. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 19 - Iran, Turkey cloud outlook for seed maker Vilmorin 

U.S. sanctions against Iran and a slide in Turkey's currency are contributing to an uncertain short-term outlook for seed maker Vilmorin as it seeks to recover from a disappointing past year, the French company said. Vilmorin, one of the world's largest suppliers of seeds for grain and vegetable crops, saw its shares tumble as much as 13.5 percent in Paris on Thursday after reporting weaker-than-expected profits for its financial year to June 30. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 18 - China soybean imports set for biggest drop in 12 yrs amid tariff conflict 

China's soybean imports are set to drop by a quarter in the last three months of 2018, their biggest fall in at least 12 years as buyers curb purchases amid the Sino-U.S. trade war and high domestic stockpiles. Soybeans, crushed to make protein-rich animal feed ingredients and vegetable oils, have been at the heart of the tit-for-tat trade dispute between the world's top two economies. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 18 - Vietnam may recall re-export order of wheat containing thistle seed -govt 

Vietnam could recall an order that goes into effect on Nov. 1 that requires companies to re-export wheat cargoes containing cirsium arvense seeds, known as Canada thistle, the government said on Wednesday. Vietnam, whose main wheat suppliers include Russia, Australia and Canada, has been battling with imports contaminated with thistle seed since May. The government is concerned that the contaminated cargoes could cause the Canada thistle weed to spread across the country and potentially harm domestic crop yields. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 18 - China urges more oversight of large pig farms amid disease epidemic 

China's vice agriculture minister said on Wednesday that local governments should step up their oversight of large-scale pig farms and breeding farms as another province reported a fresh outbreak of the highly contagious African swine fever. China has reported almost 40 separate outbreaks of the deadly disease in 10 provinces and municipalities since the first case in early August, leading to the slaughter of almost 50,000 animals. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 18 - Modified cotton could be human food source after U.S. green light 

U.S. regulators have cleared the way for farmers to grow a cotton plant genetically modified to make the cottonseed edible for people, a protein-packed potential new food source that could be especially useful in cotton-growing countries beset with malnutrition. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service on Tuesday lifted the regulatory prohibition on cultivation by farmers of the cotton plant, which was developed by Texas A&M University scientists. The plant's cottonseed cannot be used as food for people or as animal feed yet in the United States because it lacks Food and Drug Administration approval. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 18 - Ukraine grain exports at 11.1 mln T so far in 2018/19 

Ukraine has exported 11.1 million tonnes of grain since the season began in July, down from around 13 million tonnes at the same point last season, the agriculture ministry said. Ukraine has exported 6.7 million tonnes of wheat, 2.3 million tonnes of barley and 1.9 million tonnes of maize, it said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 18 - Financial investors raise net long position in Euronext wheat 

Non-commercial market investors increased their net long position in Euronext's milling wheat futures and options in the week to Oct. 12, data published by Euronext on Wednesday showed. Non-commercial participants, which include investment funds and financial institutions, raised their net long position to 84,420 contracts from 72,885 a week earlier, the data showed.

 

Oct 18 - Jordan buys 60,000 tonnes hard wheat in tender - trade 

Jordan's state grains buyer purchased 60,000 tonnes of hard milling wheat to be sourced from optional origins in a tender for up to 120,000 tonnes which closed on Wednesday, traders said. It was bought at $263 a tonne c&f for shipment in the second half of December.

 

Oct 17 - U.S. wheat exports to rise in second half of season - USDA official 

U.S. wheat exports look set for a strong second half of the 2018/19 season when shipments from Russia are expected to slow, the chairman of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) World Agricultural Outlook Board said on Tuesday. The USDA is forecasting U.S. wheat exports in the 2018/19 season will rise to 27.9 million tonnes, up from 24.52 million tonnes in the previous season. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 17 - Shades of 2014 lurking in CBOT soybean market - Karen Braun

When the Chicago Board of Trade closed for business on Monday, November soybean futures ended up 24 cents on the day, and nearly 80 cents off the contract’s all-time low from a month earlier. But last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture raised domestic soybean ending stocks for the 2018-19 marketing year to an eye-popping 885 million bushels, more than double the previous year’s inventory and 54 percent larger than the record high. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 17 - Brazil mill says Russian wheat buy was good, would buy more at right price 

One of the three Brazilian wheat mills involved in a deal to import a cargo of Russian wheat this year, the first such deal since 2010, said the quality was good and that it would possibly buy again if the price is right. Earlier this year, Brazilian wheat mills J Macedo, Dias Branco and Grande Moinho Cearense made a joint purchase of 25,000 tonnes of Russian wheat via the Kaliningrad port for discharge in the Northeast Brazilian port of Fortaleza. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 17 - Brazil front-runner's planned ministry merger could hurt farm trade - official 

Brazilian far-right presidential front-runner Jair Bolsonaro's proposal to merge the farm and environment ministries could hurt Brazil's quest for 10 percent of the global farm trade, the country's deputy agriculture minister said on Tuesday. Eumar Novacki said that he was not opposed to the idea of combining the ministries but that it would likely be viewed abroad as a step backward in the country's environmental protection and hurt consumer perceptions of its agriculture industry. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 17 - Malaysia's biodiesel output, exports set to hit records - industry body 

Malaysian biodiesel production is likely to hit record levels this year and next, with 2018 exports on track to double from 2017, pushed up as higher oil prices boost the appeal of biofuels, the head of an industry association said on Wednesday. The Southeast Asian nation is the world's No.2 producer of palm oil, which can be used as feedstock to make the bio components of biodiesel. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 17 - India aims to cut stubble burning in key states by 70 pct, but experts sceptical 

India aims to reduce stubble burning, a major source of pollution during the winter months, by 70 percent in its top two farm states this year, a top government official said on Tuesday, but experts questioned whether the target was credible. Stubble burning in Punjab and Haryana fell between Sept. 30 and Oct. 14 by more than 28 and 44 percent respectively from the year-earlier period, the official said. He didn't wish to be identified in line with government policy. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 17 - China's Sept pig herd down 1.8 pct y/y - Agri ministry 

China's September pig herd fell 1.8 percent from a year earlier but was up 0.8 percent on-month, data from the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs showed Sow herds dropped 4.8 percent in September from a year ago, and slipped 0.3 percent from the previous month, the ministry said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Egypt studying wheat hedging, still buying spot 

Egypt, the world's largest wheat importer, is studying the possibility of hedging against the rise in global prices of the grain, Supply Minister Ali Moselhy said on Monday. "Until now we are buying spot ... there is a working group formed within the finance ministry to study this (hedging) ... but to this moment no decision has been taken," Moselhy told a news conference in Cairo. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - NOPA September soy crush tops expectations at 160.779 mln bushels 

U.S. processors crushed a larger-than-expected 160.779 million bushels of soybeans in September, the largest-ever processing volume for the month, the National Oilseed Processors Association (NOPA) said on Monday. The figure was up from the 158.885 million bushels processed in August and well above the September 2017 crush of 136.419 million bushels, according to NOPA, whose members handle about 95 percent of all soybeans processed in the United States. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Brazil soy planting proceeds at record pace - consultancy 

Brazilian farmers are planting the new soy crop at a record pace, reaching 20 percent of the projected area by Thursday, consultancy AgRural said on Monday. The previous record pace was in 2016, when farmers had advanced to 18 percent of the area by this time of the year. Last season, they were at only 12 percent of plantings. The five-year average is 10 percent. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - China's Dabeinong reports suspected African swine fever case on related farm - media 

One of China's top animal feed producers said on Tuesday an affiliated firm has culled nearly 20,000 pigs due to a suspected case of African swine fever, according to a report by the China Securities Journal. Beijing Dabeinong Technology Group Co Ltd reported the information to investors in an online platform on Tuesday, the state-owned journal said. The company could not be reached for comment by Reuters. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Crop Watch: Rain, snow stall harvest in Western Corn Belt: Karen Braun 

The five Crop Watch producers west of the Mississippi River reported minimal to no harvest activity over the past week due to saturated field conditions and more unwelcome precipitation. This includes central Kansas, southern Minnesota, northeast Nebraska, east central North Dakota and east central Iowa. The Ohio soybeans were cut on Wednesday with above average results, but expectations for the Minnesota corn and Nebraska soybeans declined on disappointing adjacent yields and crop damage, respectively. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Hi-tech peer-to-peer networks let Nigerian farmers log on for cash 

It looked like the end had arrived for Adewale Fatai's chicken farm. Money was running out. Built to house 30,000 chickens, the farm was producing fewer than 2,000 chicks. His family had no funds to lend, and Nigeria's banks weren't interested. Instead, he went online. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Expanding ethanol sales would have limited U.S. market impact - analysts 

The Trump administration's plan to allow year-round sales of higher-grade corn ethanol would have limited impact on the depressed U.S. ethanol market, with record supplies and prices for the fuel hovering near the lowest in a decade, analysts said. President Donald Trump announced the decision last week ahead of a campaign trip to Iowa, the top producer of corn and ethanol. With mid-term elections looming, Trump aimed to give a boost to corn producers in the Farm Belt, who helped secure his narrow 2016 election victory. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Brazilian police refer ex-BRF executives to prosecutors in food probe 

Brazilian police have referred two former executives of food processor BRF SA to federal prosecutors in an investigation into food safety that disrupted meat production in 2017, documents seen by Reuters showed on Monday. The allegation is that former BRF Chairman Abilio Diniz and former Chief Executive Officer Pedro de Andrade Faria did not disclose damaging information when they were at the company. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Beer lovers face price spikes, shortages as climate changes - study 

Climate change will brew trouble for beer lovers in coming decades as it shrinks yields of barley, the top grain used to make the world's most popular alcoholic drink, a study published on Monday said. Extreme weather events featuring both heat waves and droughts will occur as often as every two or three years in the second half of the century if temperatures rise at current rates, the study said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - Strategie Grains raises EU maize crop estimate on strong southeast 

Strategie Grains analysts increased sharply their estimate of this year's maize harvest in the European Union on Friday as bumper yields in southeast Europe were seen offsetting a drought-hit crop further west. The EU's grain maize production in 2018 was now expected to reach 59.4 million tonnes, Strategie Grains said in a monthly report, a 1 million tonne increase from its September forecast and now stable compared with last year's crop. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - Funds flirt with bullish corn territory after U.S. yield cut: Karen Braun 

Speculators have nearly erased bullish views in Chicago-traded corn futures and options after the U.S. government late last week lowered its outlook for the domestic corn harvest. The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Thursday reduced U.S. corn yield to 180.7 bushels per acre from the previous month’s 181.3, against market predictions of an increase. This, along with a boost in domestic demand, caused corn carryout to come in 5.5 percent smaller than expected.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - China's resilient commodity imports show trade war yet to factor: Clyde Russell 

It's tempting to look at the relative resilience of China's imports of major commodities in September and conclude that the world's second-biggest economy is weathering the trade dispute with the United States quite well. The problem with this view is that while the trade conflict certainly looms as an issue in China's commodity trade, it's not yet the driving factor and any strength, or weakness, in various imports is largely a result of different dynamics. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - Trump's ethanol plan: Hype now, legal fights later 

President Donald Trump's hyping of a plan to boost ethanol demand drew cheers at an Iowa rally on Tuesday, but the oil refining industry has promised a lawsuit to block the move, so victory for Midwest farmers is far from certain. Trump on Tuesday indicated that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency should allow for a waiver for higher-ethanol gasoline, known as E15, to be sold all year, which has been prohibited due to smog concerns. He did not mention the threatened lawsuit and was not asked about it. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - NOPA September U.S. soy crush seen at 157.406 mln bushels -survey 

The National Oilseed Processors Association's (NOPA) September soybean crush is expected to be the largest on record for the month as soy plants capitalized on good profit margins for crushing the oilseed, analysts said ahead of a monthly report. NOPA members, who handle about 95 percent of all soybeans processed in the United States, likely crushed 157.406 million bushels of soybeans last month, according to an average of estimates given by nine analysts in a Reuters survey. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - Cambodia rice exports fell 8.4 percent in Jan-Sept 

Cambodia exported 389,264 tonnes of rice in the first nine months of the year, a fall of 8.4 percent compared with the same period last year, official data showed on Monday. Exports to China, Cambodia's top export market, accounted for 96,714 tonnes, data from the Secretariat of One Window Service for Rice Export Formality, a joint private-government working group on rice, showed. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - China reports new African swine fever outbreak in Liaoning province 

China's agriculture ministry said on Monday that 14 pigs have died in a fresh outbreak of African swine fever in the province of Liaoning. The outbreak in the city of Anshan is the fifth reported in the northeastern province. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - USDA makes surprise cuts to U.S. corn, soybean harvest outlooks 

The U.S. Agriculture Department surprisingly trimmed its forecasts for both domestic corn and soybean production on Thursday, with the soy cut stemming from a reduction in acres while the corn harvest will be lower due to smaller-than-expected yields. Soybean production was seen falling from the government's September estimate due to a decrease in harvested acres in key states such as Illinois and Minnesota. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - China's September soybean imports fall, but ahead of expectations 

China's soybean imports fell slightly in September from a year earlier but were ahead of market expectations, boosted by large volumes from Brazil as buyers tried to shore up stocks, customs data showed on Friday. Soybean imports are being closely watched after Beijing in July imposed a 25 percent tariff on U.S. products worth $34 billion, including soybeans, in response to U.S. penalties on Chinese goods worth the same amount. Click here to read full stories.

 

Oct 12 - Did USDA's U.S. corn yield peg post a rare high in September? - Karen Braun 

The corn market exhaled on Thursday as the U.S. government, against expectations, reduced its forecast for the U.S. crop, temporarily curbing fears over “runaway” domestic corn supplies. This was especially important after the Sept. 28 supply shock, in which data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture showed a much larger corn inventory than most market participants assumed. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - Brazil grain production to rise on bumper corn crop - Conab 

Brazilian farmers are expected to harvest up to 238.54 million tonnes of grain in the 2018/19 season, the government said on Thursday, with the South American country potentially breaking its production record thanks to expected corn and soy bumper crops. In the prior season, Brazilian farmers harvested some 227.91 million tonnes of grains like soybeans and corn, said Conab, the government food supply and statistics agency. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - Russian watchdog to check grain loading points 

Russia will inspect grain loading at ports due to complaints from major buyers about falling crop standards, the head of agriculture safety watchdog Rosselkhoznadzor was quoted as saying by the RIA news agency on Thursday.  The agriculture safety watchdog has been stepping up pressure on traders in recent weeks to pay more attention to the quality of grain in their supplies. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - Argentina may see thinner wheat crop in 2018-19 harvest - exchange 

Frost and a lack of rain could scale back Argentina's wheat crop for the 2018-19 season, which is currently seen at a record 19.7 million tonnes, the Buenos Aires Grains Exchange said on Thursday. According to the exchange's weekly report, a lack of moisture in the soil in northern Argentine provinces and late frosts in the central agricultural region could affect crop yields. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - UK wheat crop falls to five-year low - farm ministry 

Britain's farm ministry on Thursday estimated this year's UK wheat crop at a five-year low of 14.09 million tonnes, down 5.1 percent from the prior season. The decline was driven by a 5.3 percent decline in yields to 7.8 tonnes per hectare, which was only partially offset by a marginal 0.3 percent rise in area to 1.80 million hectares. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - Vietnam seeks to reduce reliance on Asian rice markets, raise exports to Africa, Americas 

Vietnam is seeking to reduce its reliance on Asian rice markets while boosting the output of high-quality grain to better position itself in the global market, the government said on Thursday. The Southeast Asian country aims to reduce its rice shipments to Asian markets to 50 percent of its total exports by 2030, from the current of 60 percent, the government said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - Trump trade war delivers farm boom in Brazil, gloom in Iowa 

The Bella Vita luxury condominium tower rises 20 stories over the boomtown of Luís Eduardo Magalhães in northeastern Brazil. Its private movie theater and helipad are symbols of how far this dusty farming community has come since it was founded just 18 years ago. Local soybean producers shell out upwards of a half-million U.S. dollars to live in the complex. Nearby farm equipment sellers, car dealerships and construction supply stores are bustling too. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - Rain slows U.S. corn, soy harvest; disrupts river barge traffic 

Excessive rains across the central United States over the past week have slowed the harvest of corn and soybeans, while rising water levels closed at least three locks on the Upper Mississippi River, a key artery for shipping Midwest grain to U.S. Gulf exporters. Cash bids for corn shipped by barge to the Gulf firmed on Tuesday, reflecting exporter demand and dwindling pipeline supplies as rising river levels slowed barge traffic.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - French wheat exports to gain from Russia supply drop - agency 

A brisk start to France's wheat export season and less competition from Russian supplies led farming agency FranceAgriMer to raise its forecast for French soft wheat exports outside the European Union in 2018/19. FranceAgriMer pegged French soft wheat exports to non-EU destinations at 8.75 million tonnes, up from its initial outlook of 8.5 million in September and well above 8.1 million in 2017/18. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - El Niño set to return before end of the year: John Kemp 

El Niño conditions are developing across the Pacific Ocean, with meteorologists now putting the probability of a full event developing by the end of the year at almost 75 percent. Sea surface temperatures are warming counter-seasonally across much of the equatorial Pacific and trade winds are slackening, both common precursors of an El Niño episode. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - Fat profits: Asian traders cash in as Europe thirsts for waste oils 

Once surreptitiously dumped down drains in the dead of night, Asia's used cooking oil is fast becoming one of the most sought-after commodities in Europe - as a feedstock for biodiesel. Aggressive green energy targets in the European Union that were bolstered further this year are pushing fuel makers to churn out biodiesel containing recycled cooking oils and fats, phasing out the use of fresh vegetable oils in the process by 2030. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - Bayer gets tentative ruling for new trial in weed-killer case 

Bayer AG's Monsanto unit on Wednesday received a tentative ruling for a new trial on the $250 million in punitive damages awarded by a jury to a groundskeeper who alleged the company's glyphosate-based weed killers, including Roundup, caused his cancer. According to a court filing in San Francisco's Superior Court of California, Judge Suzanne Bolanos was considering whether to grant the company's motion for a new trial on the punitive damages. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - Argentina wheat harvest expected to reach 19 mln tonnes in 2018-19 

Argentina's wheat harvest is expected to reach 19 million tonnes during the 2018-19 season, down from 21 million tonnes predicted previously, the Rosario grains exchange said on Wednesday. The exchange's predictions for soy and corn production remained unchanged at 50 million tonnes and 43 million tonnes, respectively. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - Vietnam's rice exports in 2018 seen at $3.2-$3.3 bln, up 26.9 pct y/y 

The value of Vietnam's rice exports in 2018 may rise to between $3.2 billion and $3.3 billion, increasing up to 26.9 percent from $2.6 billion last year, the trade ministry said on Thursday in a statement on its official Facebook page. Vietnam, the world's third-largest rice exporter after India and Thailand, is trying to increase the quality and variety of the rice it exports as well as branding of the grain to boost exports value. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 10 - Trump raises ethanol use in gasoline, appeases farmers ahead of elections 

U.S. President Donald Trump launched an effort on Tuesday to increase ethanol use in the nation's gasoline pool, delivering a long-sought political victory to the country's Farm Belt and angering oil refiners ahead of November's congressional elections. Trump announced the lifting of a ban on summer sales of gasoline blended with 15 percent ethanol, known as E15, at a closed-door meeting at the White House, Republican senators told reporters after the meeting. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 10 - Russia proposes to speed up plans to boost grain exports 

Russia's Agriculture Ministry has proposed speeding up an increase in the country's grain export capacity part of efforts by one of the world's largest wheat exporters to move into new markets. Russia aims to increase its grain export capacity by 25 million tonnes to 77.7 million tonnes by 2024, agriculture minister Dmitry Patrushev said at a meeting with President Vladimir Putin and other officials on Tuesday. Click here to read full stories.

 Oct 10 - EU set to clear start of talks to boost U.S. beef imports 

European Union countries are on the verge of agreeing to start negotiations with the United States to allow more U.S. beef into Europe, in what could be a major move to defuse transatlantic trade tensions. The European Commission sought approval from its 28 member states at the start of September to open negotiations with Washington. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 10 - U.S. Agriculture's Perdue says farmer aid could be less than first estimated 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's $12 billion package to offset farmers losses from the imposition of tariffs American exports could end up shrinking after an agreement to update NAFTA was struck, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said on Tuesday. "We will be recalculating along as we go," Perdue said in a phone interview with Reuters, regarding the second tranche of the planned compensation, estimated at about $6 billion, which was first announced in July after U.S. and China imposed trade tariffs on each other’s imports. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 10 - Brazil's leading candidate would cut environmental fines - advisor 

Brazilian farmers who break environmental laws in sensitive areas like the Amazon rainforest will face fewer fines for their infractions in a possible government of far-right front-running presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro, his top agriculture advisor told Reuters on Tuesday. Nabhan Garcia, a one-time congressman and long-time conservative leader in the agriculture sector and whose name is being floated as Bolsonaro's pick to be his agriculture minister, also confirmed plans to merge Brazil's environment and agriculture ministries. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 10 - Malaysia's palm oil stocks hit 8-month high in September 

Malaysia's palm oil inventories edged up in September to their highest in eight months, surpassing market expectations as production levels came in higher than exports despite a surge in overseas demand, government data showed on Wednesday. Stockpiles in the world's No.2 producer and exporter of palm oil, used to make products ranging from cooking oil to chocolate, rose 1.5 percent from the previous month to 2.54 million tonnes, according to the data from the Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB).  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 10 - Sumitomo takes full ownership of large Brazil ag chemicals seller 

Japan's Sumitomo Corp said on Tuesday that it had acquired the remaining 35-percent stake it did not already own in Agro Amazônia, a leading agricultural products supplier in Brazil's No. 1 soy producing state of Mato Grosso. Terms were not disclosed. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Trump to lift ban on higher-ethanol gasoline ahead of Nov. elections 

U.S. President Donald Trump will seek to lift a federal ban on summer sales of higher-ethanol blends of gasoline on Tuesday, a senior White House official said, delivering on a move long-sought by anxious Midwest farmers ahead of November's elections. The move will be coupled with restrictions on biofuel credit trading sought by merchant refiners like Valero Energy Corp and PBF Energy Inc. Those rules would be aimed at retailers and oil majors accused by merchant refiners of driving up cost of complying with biofuels blending laws. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Crop Watch: Corn, soy harvest stalled in soggy Western Belt - Karen Braun 

No U.S. Crop Watch corn or soybean field was harvested last week as heavy rains, fog and mist kept producers out of the fields for a second straight week. Six of the eight soybean fields will now be cut between two and three weeks later than originally planned due to the soggy conditions. For Crop Watch producers in the Western Corn Belt, including Kansas, Nebraska and North Dakota, weekly feedback included harvest progress in the immediate area falling to multiyear lows and rain volumes and durations were unlike any previously seen. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - China bans pig imports from Japan, Belgium over swine fever 

China banned imports of pigs, wild boars and products from Belgium after an outbreak of African swine fever, as well as imports from Japan after a regular swine fever outbreak, the General Administration of Customs said on Tuesday. The move follows a similar ban on imports from Bulgaria on Monday, and comes as the northeastern province of Liaoning reported a second outbreak of highly contagious African swine fever in two days.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Russian wheat export prices rise further on possible sales curbs 

Russian wheat export prices ended higher for the fourth week in a row, supported by speculation about potential export limits in Russia as the agriculture safety watchdog continued adding pressure on traders, analysts said on Monday. The watchdog last week said it could suspend operations of some grain-loading operations in two of Russia's top grain exporting regions. Some traders interpreted that as another step on Russia's way to potential grain export curbs.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Louis Dreyfus profit slides as soy hedging adds to challenges 

Louis Dreyfus Company's first-half net profit dropped by more than a third as a soybean hedging loss added to pressure from persisting weakness in the commodity giant's core agricultural markets. The earnings slide comes at a sensitive time for the 167-year-old business. It has recently completed its latest management shake-up while controlling shareholder Margarita Louis-Dreyfus needs almost $2 billion to support debt-laden Brazilian sugar unit Biosev and buy out family minorities. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Australia's weather bureau sees 70 pct chance of El Nino in 2018 

A recent warming of the Pacific Ocean has led to a 70 percent chance of an El Nino weather event developing this year, Australia's Bureau of Meteorology said on Tuesday. An El Nino weather event can trigger both floods and drought in different parts of the world, and is associated with warmer, dry weather across the Asia Pacific. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Brazil's BRF says CEO to step down; asset sale push goes on 

Brazilian food processor BRF SA on Monday said its recently named chief executive would step down by mid-2019, adding that it hoped to conclude by year-end asset sales he put in motion as part of a sweeping overhaul. Pedro Parente, a turnaround specialist who joined BRF in June after quitting the top job at state-controlled oil producer Petroleo Brasileiro SA, will stay on as chairman, but said Chief Operating Officer Lorival Luz would succeed him as CEO, with the transition expected to be complete in the middle of next year. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Brazil's JBS invests $12 mln in expansion, eyes China market

JBS SA, the world's largest meatpacker, is expanding production capacity at two of its Brazilian units as Chinese demand for its beef exports remain strong, the company said in a statement on Monday. The plants, which received combined expansion investments of 45 million reais ($12 million), are located in the state of Minas Gerais, the statement said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 8 - Brazil soy forward sales way ahead of last year - consultancy

Forward sales of the new Brazilian soybean crop are well ahead of last year's levels, as farmers take advantage of favorable prices and the United States-China trade dispute to clinch deals early in the season, consultancy Safras & Mercado said on Friday. Brazilian soybean producers have sold 27.3 percent of the crop that will start to be collected around January, compared with 14.1 percent that had been sold at this time last year, Safras said in a report. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 8 - China soymeal futures rise 2.5 pct to record-high amid trade worries

China soymeal futures climbed more than 2.5 percent on Monday morning to record 3,457  yuan ($501.37) per tonne amid ongoing concerns about trade between China and the United States, a major supplier of soybeans. That would also mark the biggest daily gain since June for the most actively traded contract on the Dalian Commodity Exchange. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 8 - Commodity funds undeterred by huge U.S. corn, soy stocks - Braun 

The U.S. government’s heavy stocks data did not scare investors away from Chicago-traded corn and soybeans last week, as commodity funds covered a total of about 95,000 outright short positions through Oct. 2 in corn, soybeans and soybean oil. On Sept. 28, the U.S. Department of Agriculture placed corn and soybean inventory as of Sept. 1 above trade expectations by some 138 million and 37 million bushels, respectively. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 8 - U.S. ethanol exports to Brazil drop to nearly 3-year low

Exports of corn-based U.S. ethanol to Brazil sank to the lowest levels in nearly three years in August, U.S. Department of Agriculture data showed on Friday. A big Brazilian sugar harvest pressured domestic biofuel prices, making imported ethanol comparatively more expensive than local sugar-based supplies, according to Geoff Cooper, chief executive of the Renewable Fuels Association trade group. Click here to read full stories.

 

Oct 8 - JBS sued by Kentucky woman over ground beef in salmonella recall

A Kentucky woman is suing the U.S. arm of Brazil's JBS SA , alleging she was hospitalized after consuming ground beef produced by the company that was tainted with Salmonella, according to a lawsuit filed on Friday in Arizona state court. The lawsuit comes one day after the U.S. Agriculture Department's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced that JBS Tolleson Inc was voluntarily pulling 6.5 million pounds of ground beef and other raw beef products that had been shipped to stores across the country. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 8 - Wet start seen for South Africa summer rainfall areas, dry second half

South Africa's summer rainfall region, which includes the key maize belt, is expected to have good rain in the first half of the growing season followed by below-normal precipitation as the summer progresses, the Weather Service said on Friday. An El Nino weather pattern is seen occurring in the coming months, which generally heralds drought in southern Africa. The previous one three years ago triggered an historic drought which hit harvests and fueled food inflation in the region. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 8 - Fire hits palm plantation in Egypt's New Valley, 37 hurt -report

Egypt used air force helicopters on Saturday to fight a fire which swept through palm plantations in the southwest of the country, threatening residential areas, state news agency MENA reported. The agency said that at least 37 people were hurt, mostly due to smoke inhalation, by the fire which broke out on Friday near the New Valley provincial village of el-Rashda. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - Informa Economics boosts U.S. corn, soybean harvest estimates

Private analytics firm Informa economics raised its U.S. corn and soybean production forecasts, trade sources said on Thursday. Informa pegged the U.S. corn crop at 14.890 billion bushels, based on an average yield of 182.1 bushels per acre. Soybean production was seen at 4.677 billion bushels, with yields averaging 53.0 bushels per acre. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - U.S. arm of JBS recalls 6.5 mln pounds of beef on salmonella risk

A U.S. unit of Brazil's JBS SA is recalling 6.5 million pounds of beef products processed through an Arizona plant because the meat might be contaminated with salmonella, U.S. government officials said on Thursday. U.S. investigators have identified at least 57 people in 16 states who have become ill due to consuming contaminated ground beef products made from meat traced back to JBS, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - What an impending El Niño may mean for Brazil's soybeans - Braun

Brazilian soybean growers have been blessed with good weather for the last couple of years, allowing harvest volumes to soar to unprecedented levels. But with El Niño on the way, could this trend be in danger? Not necessarily, as the year is off to a terrific start with a quick planting pace and good moisture. But the warm-water El Niño pattern in the Pacific Ocean has not always boded well later in the season for some of Brazil’s key growing regions. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - Brazil soybean exports seen at 79 mln tns in 2019/2020 mkt year - consultancy

Brazilian soybean exports will reach an estimated 79 million tonnes in the 2019/2020 marketing year, consultancy Safras & Mercado said in a statement on Thursday, referring to the period between February 2019 and January 2020. If the United States China continue to spar over trade, Brazilian soybean exports will continue to be strong in the 2018/2019 crop season, which is just starting in Brazil, Safras & Mercado said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - U.S. working to diversify farm trade away from China - ag chief

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said on Thursday that the United States "probably made a mistake" becoming too trade dependent on China and added that the administration was pursuing trade deals elsewhere. U.S. farmers have been hit hard by the Trump administration's ongoing trade dispute with China, which has shut off billions of dollars worth of agricultural trade between the giant economies. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - Canada dairy farmers unhappy after meeting Trudeau on trade deal

Canadian dairy farmers met Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Thursday to discuss his politically-risky move to open up the protected domestic market to U.S. industry but complained he had not given them details about compensation. As part of the talks to complete the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) trade deal, Canada offered 3.6 percent of its dairy market to the United States. It also promised to fully compensate farmers for any losses they might incur.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - Argentina's 2018-19 wheat crop seen at record high - exchange

Argentina's 2018-19 wheat crop is expected to be a record-high 19.7 million tonnes, with heavy rains in the last week improving conditions, the Buenos Aires Grains exchange said on Thursday. Argentina's wheat harvest is expected to be 8.8 percent larger than last season due to favorable weather conditions and an expanded planting area of 6.2 million hectares, the exchange said in its weekly report. It added that 53.6 percent of the wheat planting area had adequate to optimal moisture conditions. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 4 - Russia has no immediate plans to suspend grain loading points in Krasnodar - RIA

Russia's agriculture safety watchdog has no immediate plans to suspend the operation of grain loading points in Black Sea ports near the city of Krasnodar, a regional office of the watchdog was quoted as saying by RIA news agency on Wednesday. Chicago wheat prices rose on Wednesday after the watchdog said on Tuesday it could temporarily suspend operations of 30 inland grain loading points in two of Russia's top grain exporting regions - Krasnodar and Rostov.  Click here to read full stories

Oct 4 - India raises winter crop prices ahead of 2019 elections

India raised state-mandated prices for winter crops such as wheat and rapeseed on Wednesday, as Prime Minister Narendra Modi tries to defuse discontent among farmers ahead of elections in 2019. The government announces minimum support prices (MSPs) for most crops yearly to set a benchmark, although state agencies usually buy limited quantities of staples such as rice and wheat at those prices due to a lack of storage and funds. Market prices for many crops typically run well below MSPs. Click here to read full stories

Oct 4 - Storms drench Australia's parched interior, but won't break drought

The heaviest rain in years has fallen across parts of drought-parched inland Australia, bringing relief to struggling farmers but likely not enough water to break a big dry that has crippled the country's most productive farmland. "I just got home when the rain hit the house," said Greg Lawrence on the phone from 9 Mile Station, a sheep run just north of Broken Hill, a town 940 km (580 miles) west of Sydney. Click here to read full stories

Oct 4 - Deepening farm crisis in India could hurt Modi's re-election bid

The financial squeeze on India's farmers is set to worsen because of record high fuel prices and surging costs of fertilisers, posing a challenge to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in an election that must be held by May. The rise in input prices could not have come at worse time for farmers, already grappling with falling domestic product prices due to rising yields and abundant harvests. Click here to read full stories

Oct 4 - Brazil antitrust watchdog approves Louis Dreyfus, Amaggi JV

Brazil's antitrust regulator Cade has given the green light to a joint venture between French commodities trader Louis Dreyfus Company and Brazilian soy processor and exporter Amaggi, the country's federal register showed on Wednesday. According to Cade, the tie-up will create a digital platform to offer integrated solutions for road freight for shippers and transporters. Click here to read full stories

Oct 4 - Watchdog sues Russian meat firm Cherkizovo over safety violations

Russia's agricultural watchdog said on Wednesday it had filed a lawsuit against meat firm Cherkizovo over safety violations. Rosselkhoznadzor, the watchdog, said it had asked the court to halt sales of products made by one of Cherkizovo's poultry units, citing the detection of Salmonella and listeria bacteria. Click here to read full stories

Oct 2 - U.S. lawmakers, at impasse on new Farm Bill, mull extension of old one

U.S. lawmakers are considering a short-term extension of the Farm Bill as talks over a new bill stalled, two Republican senators said on Tuesday, a move that would leave a critical heartland issue in limbo ahead of November congressional elections. The bill provides funding for an array of key programs, including crop subsidies and rural development. The latest one, passed in 2014, expired formally on Sept. 30 after talks over its replacement broke down. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Canada PM takes Quebec dairy gamble to preserve big trade deal

With his political future at stake, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will mount a charm offensive to placate dairy farmers who say he sold them out in order to win approval of a continental trade deal. Compounding Trudeau's challenges in the influential province of Quebec, where many dairy farmers are based, voters there tossed out one of his allies on Monday in favor of a new center-right party that opposes immigration and supports supply management, as Canada's dairy protection system is known. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Driest ever September deepens Australia's drought

Australia had its driest September on record last month, and though spring rains are forecast this week across parts of the continent's east that has seen the worst drought in years, the season is predicted to offer little relief from the dry weather. The country's east coast has recorded less than a fifth of its typical rainfall over the last three months to September and is barren, with winter crops failed and graziers buying in grain to feed their herds. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Russian watchdog may suspend work at some local grain loading points

Russia's agriculture safety watchdog said it may temporarily suspend operations of 30 in land grain loading points in two of Russia's top grain exporting regions - Krasnodar and Rostov. The watchdog, Rosselkhoznadzor, has been adding pressure on traders in recent weeks to pay more attention to the quality of grain in their supplies after complaints from major buyers about falling crop standards.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Trump plans Iowa visit next week to announce pro-ethanol measure - sources

President Donald Trump is expected to visit Iowa next week to deliver on a promise to lift a summer ban on higher ethanol blends of gasoline, according to two sources familiar with the plan, aimed at helping Farm Belt Republicans in tight congressional election races. The move would cap months of fractious negotiations initiated by the White House over ways to help the oil industry deal with the cost of complying with the nation's biofuel laws, without angering farmers in the nation's heartland.

Oct 2 - Russian wheat push for access to Algerian grain tenders 

Russian wheat exporters want to register with the Algerian authorities by the end of the year to start a process aimed at securing access to a market now dominated by France, the Russian authorities said on Monday. Russian wheat has been barred from international tenders in Algeria, one of the world's biggest wheat importers, for failing to meet the North African nation's strict bug damage controls. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Virus hurts hopes of fatter returns for Russian pork producers 

Russia's pork industry is being hampered by African Swine Fever (ASF) as outbreaks of the virus are preventing producers from exporting more to lucrative Asian markets and leaving them with falling prices at home, industry experts say. Russia first reported ASF in 2007 and has registered more than 1,300 cases since then as the highly contagious hemorrhagic disease of pigs has spread from the southern Caucasus region to the country's northwest region and Siberia in the east. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Will U.S.-China trade war end up worthwhile for U.S. soybeans? - Braun 

China’s absence from the U.S. soybean market has put tremendous pressure on both soybean growers and Chicago-traded soybean futures over the last several months. But the United States’ new trade pact with Mexico and Canada may offer some hope for a similar outcome with major U.S. trade partner China. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - EU rapeseed area to fall 8 pct on drought, unattractive prices - analyst 

The area sown with rapeseed for the 2019 harvest in the European Union is expected to fall by 8 percent from this year's level as farmers face drought conditions and less attractive prices compared with cereals, consultancy Strategie Grains said. In its first estimate of oilseed sowing trends for next year's harvest, the firm's analysts forecast the rapeseed area would decline to 6.32 million hectares from 6.86 million hectares in 2018. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Brazil 2018-19 soybean crop seen surpassing 120 mln tonnes - poll

Brazil's 2018-19 soybean crop is seen reaching 120.4 million tonnes, a record, according to the average view from 10 analysts and consultants in a Reuters poll. In a previous poll in August, analysts had on average seen the crop at 119.76 million tonnes. They see the total soy planted area growing 2.8 percent in the new season to 36.14 million hectares (see table below). Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Cash, cuts and confusion; Trade deal spurs Canadian dairy fears 

Canada's dairy concessions to the United States helped secure a hard-won trade deal, but they spurred talk on Monday of compensation, confusion and curtailed milk production, as a protectionist system faces new threats. U.S. and Canadian negotiators on Sunday reached a tentative trade deal, following an earlier deal between the United States and Mexico, that preserves a trilateral pact between the three North American countries, newly named the United-States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Crop Watch: Wet, cool weather slows activity in all eight states - Braun 

Harvest activity and crop progress were slow for the Crop Watch corn and soybean fields last week as wet and/or cool weather plagued all eight producers in some way or another. That theme is likely to continue in many areas as the forecast for the next two weeks is much wetter than normal across the U.S. Midwest. Click here to read full stories.

 

Oct 1 - U.S. soybean, corn supplies bigger than expected ahead of harvest 

U.S. corn and soybean supplies were bigger than expected despite record usage during the summer, the U.S. government said on Friday. Weak prices for corn and soybeans, stemming from concerns about exports, stoked domestic demand from crushers and processors eager to run their plants as much as possible amid strong profit margins. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - Funds cover CBOT corn shorts but get stung by heavy stocks - Braun 

Speculators had begun last week to reverse their heavily bearish attitudes toward Chicago-traded corn and soybean futures, but in an all-too-familiar fashion, U.S. government numbers took the wind out of the sails once again. The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Friday published its quarterly stocks report, which reflects U.S. corn, soybean and wheat supply as of Sept. 1. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - China to lift restrictions where 2nd African swine fever outbreak found 

China is set to lift restrictions on an area in central Henan province, where the country's second African swine fever outbreak occurred last month, the agriculture ministry said on Sunday. The local government in Zhengzhou plans to officially lift the blockade on Oct. 1, but it must take measures to prevent recurrence of the highly contagious disease, the ministry said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - Saudi Arabia plans to allow private sector to import feed barley - SPA 

Saudi Arabia, the world's largest importer of feed barley, will restore a private sector role in the trade after two years during which it was handled solely by the state, Minister of Environment, Water and Agriculture Abdel Rahman Al-Fadli was quoted as saying on Sunday. Saudi Arabia used to import its feed barley through the private sector but since 2016 the responsibility for imports has been held by the state grain buyer, the Saudi Grains Organisation (SAGO). Click here to read full stories

Oct 1 - Palm oil prices seen trading at 2,200-2,600 ringgit/T in H1 2019 - analyst Mielke 

Crude palm oil prices are seen trading between 2,200 ringgit ($532) and 2,600 ringgit a tonne in the first half of 2019 as demand for the tropical oil grows from the biodiesel industry, leading analyst Thomas Mielke said on Friday. He added that there was limited downside potential at current price levels, and that palm would bottom out at about 2,100 ringgit. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - Brazil to export 5 mil T soybeans to China in January - analyst Mistry 

Brazil is expected to export 5 million tonnes of soybeans to China in January, said a leading edible oils analyst, as a trade spat has China shifting its purchases from the United States to South America. Brazil's exports of soybeans in January are expected to come from Parana, its second-largest producing state, because its easy port access will enable quicker shipment to China, said Dorab Mistry on the sidelines of the Globoil India conference. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - NZ regulator halts Tegel's purchase of land for huge chicken farm 

New Zealand's overseas investment regulator on Monday turned down an application by Tegel Group Holdings Ltd to buy land on which it planned to build a huge chicken farm in the country's north. Tegel, in the process of being acquired by the local unit of Philippines poultry supplier Bounty Fresh Food Inc, wants to construct a farm capable of raising 9 million chickens a year for meat in the town of Dargaville. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - Fonterra's NZ milk production up 5 pct in August on favourable weather 

Milk producer Fonterra said on Monday its New Zealand milk production rose 5 percent in August from a year earlier due to ideal weather conditions. The company's Australian milk production dipped 4 percent in July on higher farm input costs and drought across parts of the country, Fonterra said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - India's rapeseed output could jump 17 pct - Emami Agrotech CEO 

India's rapeseed mustard production in 2018/19 could jump nearly 17 percent from a year ago to 7 million tonnes as higher prices are likely to prompt farmers to expand areas under planting, a leading Indian edible oil importer said. "Mustard crop can grow to 7 million tonnes," said Sudhakar Desai, chief executive officer of Emami Agrotech, up from 6 million tonnes in the same period a year earlier. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - Damaged soy crop hits farmers reeling from U.S.-China trade war 

A rain-damaged soybean harvest in the U.S. Mississippi Delta is heaping more pain on farmers already suffering from a damaging trade war between the United States and China that has dragged prices to lows not seen in a decade. Late-season storms, including bands of showers from Hurricane Florence, soaked ripe soybeans from Memphis, Tennessee, to northern Louisiana over the past two weeks, enhancing mold and fungus growth and causing some beans to rot in their pods, grain traders said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - IGC raises forecasts for 2018/19 world corn, wheat crops 

The International Grains Council on Thursday raised its forecast for world corn (maize) production in the 2018/19 season by 10 million tonnes to 1.074 billion tonnes, driven by improved crop outlooks in the United States, the European Union and Ukraine. The inter-governmental body, in a monthly update, raised its forecast for the U.S. corn crop to 376.6 million tonnes, up from a previous forecast of 370.5 million and now above the prior season's 371.0 million. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - Trade war could pull soybean futures below $8/bushel - analyst Mielke 

Chicago soybean futures could fall below $8 a bushel for the first time in a decade as the escalating Sino-U.S. trade war prompts China to cut purchases from the United States, a leading commodity analyst, Thomas Mielke, said on Thursday. "If the China trade war persists, we should see prices in Chicago falling below $8 a bushel, unless we get weather problems in South America," Mielke, editor of Germany-based newsletter Oil World, told the Globoil India conference. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - Beef demand, oilseed crush margins boost Cargill 1st-qtr profit

Grains trader Cargill Inc reported a nearly 5 percent rise in quarterly profit on Thursday as global demand for beef and improved oilseed crushing results offset challenges in several business units. But Cargill also faced various headwinds across the company - particularly in its protein and food ingredients units, both of which have been strategic growth areas. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - White House mulls limits on biofuel trading as part of E15 deal - sources 

The White House is considering imposing restrictions on trading of biofuel credits, hoping to discourage speculation and reduce costs for oil refiners to comply with U.S. biofuels policy, according to three sources familiar with the discussions. The sources, who asked not to be named because they are not authorized to comment on the discussions, said an announcement could be made in coming weeks. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - EU won't impose immediate tariffs on cheap Argentine biodiesel 

The European Commission has decided not to impose provisional import tariffs on a flood of low-priced Argentine biodiesel until it gathers more information, although it considers the fuel to be subsidised and a potential threat to local producers. The decision, detailed in a document seen by Reuters, comes as a major blow for European producers of fuels made from vegetable and recycled oil.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - Indonesia biodiesel output could jump 40 pct in 2019 - official 

Indonesia's biodiesel production could rise to 7 million tonnes in 2019, up 40 percent from an estimated 5 million tonnes this year, due to a new programme to boost local biodiesel consumption, said an Indonesian ministry official on Thursday. The world's largest palm oil producer launched an initiative in September that requires all diesel fuel to contain at least 20 percent bio content as part of efforts to cut Indonesia's fuel import bill, support the rupiah and increase palm oil consumption.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - Taiwan signs deal to buy $1.56 billion in Iowa, Minnesota soybeans 

Taiwanese trade officials and business leaders signed a letter of intent on Thursday to purchase as much as 3.9 million metric tons of soybeans from farmers in Minnesota and Iowa over the next two years, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton said in a statement. The Taiwanese Agricultural Trade Goodwill delegation said it plans to purchase between 3.2 million and 3.9 million tonnes valued at up to $1.56 billion of Midwestern soybeans in 2018 and 2019, state officials said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - Drought leads to drop in French rapeseed area - producers 

Parched conditions in France will prevent farmers from completing rapeseed sowing and lead to a sharp drop in the area planted for next year's harvest, oilseed producers group Terres Univia said on Thursday. The dry weather is expected to cause the rapeseed area for the 2019 crop to decline by 150,000-250,000 hectares from around 1.5 million hectares this year, it said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - K+S flags 80 mln eur hit on Q3 profit due to drought 

German potash miner K+S said on Friday that limits to waste water discharge into the river Werra near its main German fertiliser production site caused a hit of about 80 million euros ($93 million) on third-quarter earnings after a summer drought lowered river water levels. As a result of the hit to earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA), the group's previous full-year guidance for 660 to 740 million euros in EBITDA will be revised on Nov. 15, when full third-quarter results are due for publication, K+S said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - India's soymeal exports to jump on Chinese demand, weak rupee - trade body 

India's soymeal exports in 2018/19 could jump as much as 70 percent from a year ago, buoyed by expected purchases from the world's biggest soybean buyer China, industry officials told Reuters on Thursday. A depreciation in the rupee and a jump in soybean output will help India gain market share in China, which is looking for new suppliers after imposing tariffs on key U.S. farm commodities as part of a Sino-U.S. trade row, they said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Crop chop: China shuns U.S. soybeans amid trade war, turns to Brazil 

China's soybean processors are snapping up record volumes of Brazilian cargoes for shipment in the fourth quarter, curbing purchases of U.S. crops in North America's peak marketing season as the trade war between Washington and Beijing intensifies. That shift away from U.S. beans by China, which takes more than 60 percent of the commodity traded worldwide, will pile further pressure on benchmark Chicago Board of Trade prices after they plumbed 10-year lows last week. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - What to look for in USDA's grain stocks data on Friday - Braun 

Market participants could see some unexpectedly friendly corn and soybean numbers from the government later this week, but any excitement could be very short-lived if traders are too distracted by the large, ongoing U.S. harvests and heavy supply ideas for soybeans in the coming year. The U.S. Department of Agriculture will publish estimates of Sept. 1 grain and oilseed inventory on Friday at noon EDT (1600 GMT). Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Argentina soybean exports to grow 15.4 mln tonnes on Chinese demand 

Argentina's soybean exports will grow 15.4 million tonnes in the 2018-19 harvest season, the Buenos Aires Grains Exchange said on Wednesday, citing strong demand in China driven by its ongoing trade dispute with the United States. That was four times more than last season, when a severe drought sapped Argentina's grain export sector, cutting profits and contributing to Argentina's current economic woes. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Louis Dreyfus CEO points to stronger results, rejects crisis talk 

Agricultural commodity giant Louis Dreyfus has seen improved results this year and has no plans to be absorbed in a merger, its chief executive said on Wednesday, rejecting talk of a crisis after the surprise exits of its former CEO and finance chief. Ian McIntosh was speaking a day after Louis Dreyfus Company announced his appointment following the resignation of CEO Gonzalo Ramirez Martiarena and CFO Armand Lumens. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Buyers battle at Australian wool auction as drought cuts supplies 

Auctioneer Ian Sharp has been selling Australian agricultural products to the highest bidder since 1968, and he's never seen demand like this before. Earlier this year, the benchmark price for fine Australian merino wool gained a foothold above the once mythic A$20/kg (about $6.60/lb) price, as one of Australia's worst-ever droughts leaves farmers struggling to keep flocks fed. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Indian cabinet approves incentives for 2018/19 sugar exports - govt statement 

India's cabinet on Wednesday approved incentives to encourage cash-strapped mills to export sugar in the 2018/19 season, a government statement said on Wednesday, part of efforts to trim bulging domestic stockpiles. Prime Minister Narendra Modi's cabinet will give transport subsidies of 1,000 rupees ($13.77) a tonne to 3,000 rupees a tonne to sugar mills, depending on their distance from ports, the statement said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Crude palm oil prices seen at $590/T CIF Rotterdam by year end - analyst McGill 

Crude palm oil prices are forecast to trend at $590 per tonne including cost, freight and insurance (CIF Rotterdam) by the end of the year on the back of firm demand from the biodiesel sector, industry analyst Julian McGill said on Thursday. "The crude palm oil price, despite pressure from soybean oil, is being supported by free market biodiesel demand," said McGill, head of Southeast Asia at commodities consultancy LMC International. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - India opens door to Brazilian pork as swine fever sweeps China 

India approved imports of Brazilian pork, Brazil's government said on Wednesday, relieving pressure on the market amid the rapid spread of African swine fever in neighboring China. Brazil's Agriculture Ministry said the Indian government had officially confirmed the decision a day earlier. Brazilian animal meat processing association ABPA celebrated the access to a market of 1.3 billion people. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Sierentz opens palm oil trading desks in Singapore, Sao Paulo 

Sierentz Global Merchants, a commodities trading firm controlled by members of the Louis-Dreyfus family, has opened palm oil trading desks in Singapore and Sao Paulo, expanding its reach beyond its initial focus on European and Black Sea grains. Sierentz, which is separate from global trader Louis Dreyfus Company (LDC), has hired at least two people in each office, focusing on the palm and lauric oil markets, according to their LinkedIn profiles. LDC is majority owned by other family members. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - South Africa's 2018 maize output seen 23 percent lower from 2017 at 12.9 mln tonnes - CEC 

South Africa is expected to harvest 12.9 million tonnes of maize in 2018, the government's Crop Estimates Committee (CEC) said on Wednesday, largely in line with market expectations. The CEC's final forecast was 0.78 percent lower than a Reuters poll of four analysts which pegged the harvest at 13.002 million tonnes. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - China to start buying more Argentine soybeans – Oil World 

China is starting to buy more Argentine soybeans because of China’s trade war with the United States, and Argentina will in turn purchase more U.S. soybeans to meet its own needs, oilseeds analysts Oil World said on Tuesday. Soybean exports from the United States to China have come to a virtual stop since July when Beijing imposed heavy tariffs on U.S. imports as part of a trade war between the two countries.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Louis Dreyfus CEO, finance chief quit in latest shake-up 

Louis Dreyfus Company announced the surprise departures of its chief executive and head of finance on Tuesday, triggering another reshuffle at the commodities giant as it strives to recover from weak agricultural markets. The group said in a statement that Gonzalo Ramirez Martiarena had resigned as CEO after three years in the post to pursue other opportunities, and would be replaced with immediate effect by Ian McIntosh, previously chief strategy officer. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Rains improve conditions for winter grain sowing in Russia, Ukraine 

Recent rains across Ukraine and Russia have improved conditions for 2018's winter grain sowing and the prospects for the next year's harvest, weather forecasters said on Tuesday. Russia and Ukraine, major global wheat exporters via the Black Sea, were previously sowing winter grains for the 2019 crop amid dry weather and a risk to next year's crop after a decline in the 2018 crop.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Brazil to import 1 mln tonnes of soy from U.S., says trader 

Brazil, the world's No 1 soy exporter, is expected to import around 1 million tonnes of the oilseed in coming months from its largest global competitor, the United States, as local supplies dwindle, according to Sao Paulo-based grain trader Agribrasil. It would be the first time that the South American nation, an agricultural powerhouse, needs to import large volumes of soybeans from the United States - a result of massive exports by Brazilian soy producers to China in recent months after the Asian nation slapped a 25 percent import tariff on U.S. beans. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Germany to become net grain importer after drought - USDA 

Germany, in most years one of the EU’s largest grain exporters, is expected to become a net importer after a hot, dry summer damaged crops, said a report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN). "The drought has heavily affected grain, rapeseed and forage production in Germany," said the report. "As a result, Germany is expected to strongly increase imports of soybeans/soybean meal and to become a net grain importer." Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Argentina national strike protests inflation, shuts grains port 

Shops across Argentina were shuttered and the streets in the capital, Buenos Aires, were quiet on Tuesday after the country's largest union called a 24-hour strike to protest President Mauricio Macri's handling of the economy, which has been racked by runaway inflation. Argentina's main agricultural port of Rosario was closed by the strike, as were public transport services and private freight shippers, unions said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Australia's Nufarm swings to loss as drought cuts herbicide sales 

Australian crop protection company Nufarm Ltd reported an annual loss on Wednesday as a severe drought cut domestic sales, prompting it to slow down production, write down its business and launch a capital raising. Nufarm's woes augur badly for other firms exposed to Australia's rural sector, which is struggling through the driest conditions in decades across the country's east. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Indonesian activists abseil down palm refinery tanks in deforestation protest 

Environmentalists abseiled down storage tanks and unfurled banners at a palm oil refinery in Indonesia on Tuesday in protest at deforestation of the country's tropical forests. They draped banners saying "drop dirty palm oil now", while other activists clung to the anchor of a cargo ship near the facility operated by a unit of Singapore's Wilmar International, the world's biggest palm oil trader. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - East, West Africa lead continent's fertilizer uptake push

Africa’s annual fertilizer consumption is expected to reach 13.6 million metric tonnes of nutrient by 2030 from 7.6 mmt now, with East and West Africa fast growth areas as farmers look to boost crop yields, industry analysts CRU said on Tuesday. The world’s poorest continent, which has vast tracts of uncultivated land and where most of the population are subsistence farmers, has traditionally lagged behind other regions when it comes to fertilizer use. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - U.S. confirms lead as EU's main soybean supplier 

The United States confirmed its status as the main supplier of soybeans to the European Union this week, having supplied 52.4 percent of the 2.9 million tonnes of soybeans imported into the bloc so far in 2018/19, official data showed on Monday. The EU had imported 1.54 million tonnes of U.S. soybeans since the start of the season on July 1 up to Sept. 23, while the second-largest supplier Brazil shipped 1.17 million, giving it a market share of 39.7 percent, data published by the European Commission showed. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - South African phosphate miner plans London IPO by year-end - CEO 

South African phosphate miner, Kropz, is on track to list on London's AIM Stock Exchange by the end of the year as it prepares for first production from its main asset in 2019, its chief executive said on Tuesday. Kropz wants to raise cash to pay down debt and further develop its Elandsfontein phosphate mine, which is expected to begin production in the second half of next year, before reaching 900,000 tonnes per annum in 2020. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - India's monsoon rainfall drops further, endangering summer crops 

India's monsoon has produced 9 percent less rain than usual, raising concerns over production of the country's summer-sown crops as rainfall in many key grains producing states has been nearly a quarter lower than normal levels. Summer crop production is being closely watched by markets as lower output could spoil Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's efforts to raise the income of farmers, who make up more than half of its 1.3 billion people, in an election year. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - Russian wheat prices ended week higher on stronger rouble 

Russian wheat export prices rose further at the end of last week on a stronger rouble, which is trading at more than six-week highs against the dollar, and tougher control of quality, analysts said on Monday.Russia's food safety watchdog beefed up quality controls on grain exports after complaints from major buyers about falling crop standards in mid-September.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - China says new African swine fever outbreak reported in Inner Mongolia 

China said on Monday it has confirmed a new outbreak of African swine fever in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of northern China, as authorities struggle to contain the highly contagious disease. The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said a slaughterhouse in the city of Hohhot reported the outbreak, adding that four pigs were infected with, and two had died from, African swine fever. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - Crop Watch: Corn, soy harvest presses on amid unwelcome rain - Braun 

Three more Crop Watch 2018 fields were harvested last week: the Iowa and Illinois soybeans and the Kansas corn. Final yield scores ranged from 1 (Kansas) to 5 (Iowa). Fields due for harvest this week include corn in Iowa and Illinois and soybeans in Nebraska and Ohio. An active weather pattern has recently brought heavier rain amounts to the Upper Midwest and Northern Plains, slowing field activity.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - Philippines ramps up rice imports to stem high retail prices 

The Philippines on Monday decided to ramp up its rice imports before year-end, announcing a decision to purchase an additional 500,000 tonnes apart from the 250,000 tonnes it planned to buy via an open tender. The Southeast Asian county, one of the world's biggest rice buyers, also planned to buy 1 million tonnes of rice next year, Agriculture Secretary Emmanuel Pinol said, as the government moves aggressively to curb rising retail prices of the grain. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - Morocco’s OCP and China’s Hubei Forbon team up to develop fertilisers 

The world’s largest phosphate exporter, Morocco’s Office Cherifien des Phosphate (OCP) said on Monday it has signed an agreement with China’s fertiliser additives supplier Hubei Forbon to develop a new generation of eco-friendly fertilisers. Under the partnership, the two companies will work together to develop a new generation of high added-value fertilizers such as biostimulants, sulfur fertilizers, fertilizers with micronutrients and water-soluble fertilizers, the OCP said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 24 - Chinese Cash Market Prices for Grains, Oilseeds, Sugar, Porks, Cotton etc ... are / will be Unavailable.
Chinese Data are unavailable due to holiday's :
    24 sep  lundi        Mid-Autumn Festival
    1 oct    lundi         National Day
    2 oct    mardi        National Day Golden Week holiday
    3 oct    mercredi    National Day Golden Week holiday
    4 oct    jeudi         National Day Golden Week holiday    
    5 oct    vendredi    National Day Golden Week holiday    
    6 oct    samedi      National Day Golden Week holiday
    7 oct    dimanche   National Day Golden Week holiday

Sep 24 - For bold Chinese buyers of soybeans, bargain U.S. prices trump trade war

At least two cargoes of U.S. soybeans are heading for China as some buyers are willing to risk taking up historically cheap U.S. beans even amid worries that Beijing may take further steps to deter imports amid mounting trade tensions with Washington. Grain traffic from the United States to China has nearly ground to a halt since Beijing hit $50 billion in U.S. imports, including soybeans, with hefty tariffs, in retaliation for a similar move by Washington.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 24 - China's August grain imports slide on Sino-U.S. trade war

China's grain imports fell sharply in August, customs data showed on Sunday, a month after Beijing imposed hefty tariffs on shipments from the United States, one of its top suppliers. China brought in 60,000 tonnes of sorghum in August, down 78.5 percent from 259,892 tonnes a year ago, according to figures published by the General Administration of Customs. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 24 - Funds trash CBOT corn, wheat, but stand pat in soy -Braun

World grain stocks may be tightening, but investors were turned off toward Chicago-traded futures and options last week amid high expectations for the ongoing U.S. corn and soybean harvests and uncertainty over trade with top bean buyer China. Money managers were very heavy sellers in corn through Sept. 18 but hardly changed their stance in soybeans, somewhat against predictions. They dumped bullish bets in Chicago wheat and reached an all-time short position in soybean oil. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 24 - Swiss voters reject more aid for farmers

Swiss voters decisively rejected more help for farmers in two referendums on Sunday, heeding the government's warnings that the measures would send food prices rocketing and hurt the economy, projections for broadcaster SRF showed. Opinion polls had shown early widespread support for more farm aid was fading as the vote neared and more details about likely costs emerged. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 24 - Argentina bets on $600 mln satellite to boost agriculture sector

Argentina is launching a new microwave imaging satellite to monitor natural disasters and soil moisture, in a long-term bid to bolster the farm sector, an industry that has historically been the backbone of the country's economy. Scheduled to launch on a SpaceX Falcon rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Oct. 6, Argentina's SAOCOM 1a satellite "is going to boost the high quality precision agriculture Argentina relies on," President Mauricio Macri told farmers and industry representatives last week. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 24 - Ukraine grain exports at 8.8 mln tonnes so far

Around 8.8 million tonnes of grain have been exported or prepared for future export so far this season, down from around 9.7 million tonnes at the same point last season, the state service for food safety said on Friday. So far in the 2018/19 season, which runs from July to June, Ukraine has exported 5.2 million tonnes of wheat, 2 million tonnes of barley and 1.4 million tonnes of maize, it said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 21 - Australia signs one of the 1st new-crop wheat export deals-traders

Australian suppliers have signed one of the country's first new-crop wheat export deals with a sale of 50,000 tonnes to Thailand, two trade sources said. Australian Premium White (APW) wheat was sold to flour millers in Thailand at around $280 a tonne, including cost and freight (C&F), for arrival in December-January, they said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 21 - As U.S.-China trade row grows, India urges China to drop meal import ban – sources

India has urged China to drop a years-long ban on rapeseed meal imports from the South Asian nation at a meeting with government officials and feedmakers as it aims to boost sales of critical farm goods amid growing U.S.-China trade tensions. The meeting was held at India's embassy in Beijing on Wednesday, according to an Indian government official and a soymeal purchasing manager at a pig farmer who attended and spoke to Reuters on the sidelines of an industry conference here on Thursday. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 21 - WTO members clamour for more clarity on US farm spending

Trading partners will demand more details from the United States at the World Trade Organization next week about its planned $12 billion aid package for U.S. farmers hurt by the Trump administration’s tariff wars. The U.S. aid package, announced in July, is intended to shield U.S. farmers from the repercussions of trade disputes between the United States and China, the European Union and others. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 21 - Indonesia aims to coax, not compel, exporters to convert dollar revenue – finmin

Indonesia's finance minister said the government aims to "persuade" exporters to keep earnings onshore and convert them into rupiah, rather than make this mandatory, amid confusion over a plan floated this week to support the ailing currency. On Tuesday, Trade Minister Enggartiasto Lukita had said authorities would make it mandatory for exporters of commodities such as palm oil, coal, oil and natural gas to keep half of their proceeds onshore for at least six months and convert them to rupiah. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 21 - Malaysia keeps Oct crude palm oil export tax at zero pct

Malaysia maintained its export tax on crude palm oil for October at zero percent, according to a circular on the Malaysian Palm Oil Board's website on Friday, citing the national customs department. The export tax was zero percent in September as well. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 20 - U.S. soy seizes EU market, bolstering Trump trade deal

The United States has supplanted Brazil as the European Union's top supplier of soybeans since a deal in July with President Donald Trump to avert a trade war, according to EU data seen by Reuters on Thursday. In the 12 weeks to mid-September, U.S. soybeans accounted for 52 percent of imports to the EU, rising 133 percent compared with the same period last year to 1.47 million tonnes. The United States had just 25 percent of the market in the same period of 2017. Click here to read full stories

Sep 20 - U.S. growers faced with securing buyers, storage for big crops - Braun

The United States has once again produced record-yielding corn and soybean crops, but as the harvest begins, the challenge to find storage for unsold bushels may be greater than ever amid already burgeoning supply. Raising more bushels is generally ideal for farmers to offset production costs, especially in a low-price environment. However, harvest volumes in the top growing states are expected to soar, adding to the importance of equally healthy demand. Click here to read full stories

Sep 20 - Banks, traders launch first commodities blockchain platform

Global banks and trading firms are launching the first blockchain-based platform for financing the trading of commodities from oil to wheat, they said in a joint statement on Wednesday. The platform will be run by a venture called komgo SA, based in Geneva, Switzerland, and is due to go live later this year. Click here to read full stories

Sep 20 - China's sow herd falls in August by 4.8 pct from a year earlier

China's sow herd fell in August by 4.8 percent from a year earlier, the country's State Council said on its website on Wednesday citing data from the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, the biggest drop this year. The numbers reflect this year's poor pig prices as well as some impact from the recent outbreaks of African swine fever, said Yao Guiling, an analyst at China-America Commodity Data Analytics. Click here to read full stories

Sep 20 - Brazil's BRF sees rising competition for corn from ethanol makers

Brazil's largest poultry processor BRF SA has seen rising competition for corn supplies in the country's center-west region coming from plants producing corn-based ethanol, Chief Executive Pedro Parente said on Wednesday. The executive said the new situation posed a challenge for the company regarding securing raw material for feed at reasonable cost. Corn-based ethanol is a relatively new trend in Brazil, but has been developing quickly in center-west states such as Mato Grosso due to the ample supplies of the cereal. Click here to read full stories

Sep 20 - Cargill recalls about 132,000 lbs of beef products over possible contamination

Cargill Meat Solutions is recalling about 132,000 pounds of ground beef products that may have been contaminated with E.Coli, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Wednesday. Cargill's ground beef had been identified in an August investigation into an E.Coli outbreak which had resulted in 17 illnesses and one death, the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) said in a statement. Click here to read full stories

Sep 19 - Inside China's strategy in the soybean trade war

The executive from one of China's biggest soybean crushers sat on a panel at a Kansas City agricultural exports conference, listening to an expert beside him explain why China would remain dependent on U.S. soybeans to feed its massive hog herds. When his turn to speak came, Mu Yan Kui told the international audience of soy traders that everything they just heard was wrong. Then Mu ticked off a six-part strategy to slash Chinese consumption and tap alternate supplies with little financial pain. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 19 - Hog deaths, manure flooding from Florence seen surpassing 2016 hurricane

North Carolina estimated on Tuesday that 3.4 million poultry birds and 5,500 hogs died in Hurricane Florence, exceeding the number killed in the state's last major hurricane two years ago. The North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services projected the animal death toll after emergency workers and veterinarians spent days in the field assessing losses at farms following the storm. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 19 - Bayer's Monsanto asks U.S. court to toss $289 mln glyphosate verdict

Bayer AG unit Monsanto on Tuesday asked a California judge to throw out a $289 million jury verdict awarded to a man who alleged the company's glyphosate-based weed-killers, including Roundup, gave him cancer. The company said in motions filed in San Francisco's Superior Court of California that the jury's decision was insufficiently supported by the evidence presented at trial by school groundskeeper Dewayne Johnson. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 19 - Bayer says agriculture trade flows may change amid tariffs dispute

Bayer said on Tuesday it would be difficult to predict 2019 earnings at its agriculture business, which now includes Monsanto, because a U.S.-Chinese trade dispute could reroute global trade flows in farming commodities. The head of Bayer's crop science division told Reuters his company could even benefit if U.S. farmers switched to grow more corn to avoid barriers to the soy trade imposed by China in response to U.S. tariffs on Chinese products. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 19 - Informa Economics sees more U.S. corn acres in 2019, less soy

Private analytics firm Informa Economics projected that U.S. corn plantings would rise 4.4 percent in 2019 to 93.044 million acres, while soybean acres would decline 7.5 percent, according to an Informa client note seen by Reuters. Informa forecast a U.S. 2019 corn crop of 15.256 billion bushels based on a yield of 178.0 bushels per acre (bpa). Click here to read full stories.

Sep 19 - Global dairy prices fall for third time in a row, despite signs of robust demand

Global dairy prices fell at the third fortnightly auction in a row early Wednesday as New Zealand's supply of key products ramped up. The GDT Price Index dipped 1.3 percent to an average selling price of $2,934 per tonne, after falling 0.7 percent at the previous sale. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - Millions of chickens drown in Florence floodwaters, manure pits damaged

U.S. food companies kept slaughter plants shut on Monday in southeastern states swamped by Hurricane Florence as catastrophic flooding killed nearly 2 million chickens, collapsed the walls of at least two hog manure pits, and made stretches of major roads impassable. Florence, which has dumped up to 36 inches (91 cm) of rain on North Carolina since Thursday, was interrupting supply lines around the state and into neighboring South Carolina. Meteorologists have warned that the worst is yet to come as rivers rise.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - Drought to trim Australia's golden fleece

Australia on Tuesday trimmed its forecast for wool production by 6 percent as drought across the country's east coast forces farmers to cull sheep despite record prices for their fleece. In its latest update, Australia's chief commodity forecaster outlined the cost of a prolonged drought across the east coast, weather that casts a shadow over many of the Australia's largest agricultural companies and the wider economy. Click here to read full stories.

 

Sep 18 - NOPA August soy crush 158.885 million bu, below trade expectations

U.S. processors crushed 158.885 million bushels of soybeans in August, a figure that fell below a range of trade expectations but nonetheless represented the largest August total on record, the National Oilseed Processors Association (NOPA) said on Monday. The August figure was down from the 167.733 million bushels crushed in July. Analysts had been expecting a crush of 163.870 million bushels, based on the average of estimates given by eight analysts in a Reuters survey. Analysts' estimates ranged from 160.0 million bushels to 167.5 million bushels. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - Crop Watch: Indiana corn tops expectations, Iowa and Kansas on deck - Braun

The Indiana corn last Thursday became the first of the Crop Watch 2018 fields to be harvested, and the results were outstanding. The Kansas and Iowa corn fields should be harvested this week along with the Iowa and Illinois soybeans. The Indiana and Ohio soybeans are about a week away from being cut and the Illinois corn will be ready next week. The combines will likely come to the rest of the fields between Sept. 30 and Oct. 20. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - China's pig fever outbreak a boon for chicken farmers

An outbreak of African swine fever in China is proving to be a windfall for chicken farmers, helping drive up prices of the country's second-most popular meat to two-and-a-half year highs. With pork in short supply as authorities try to contain the highly contagious disease, shoppers are turning to chicken as a substitute, with some diners also concerned about safety. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - Tyson Foods CEO steps down for personal reasons

Tyson Foods Inc Chief Executive Officer Tom Hayes will step down at the end of the month for personal reasons after less than two years in the role, the top U.S. meat processor said on Monday. Noel White, a company veteran who has been running Tyson's chicken, beef and pork businesses, will replace Hayes. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - Macquarie to buy Australian farms of Qatar's Hassad Food

Australia's Macquarie Group Ltd said it has agreed to buy most of the Australian farm portfolio of Qatar's Hassad Food, the agricultural arm of the country's sovereign wealth fund. Neither Macquarie nor Qatar's state-run news agency gave a price for the deal. The Australian Financial Review reported it was worth about A$300 million ($215 million). Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - EU crop monitor trims maize, sugar beet yields again after drought

The effects of a summer drought have continued to weigh on crops in the European Union despite less severe conditions in the past month, the EU's crop monitoring service said on Monday, as it trimmed its outlook for 2018 maize and sugar beet yields. Persistent dryness, which has hurt crops and parched grasslands across northern Europe, also poses a risk for the rapeseed that has just been sown for next year's harvest, the MARS service said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - Cuban agriculture faces another hard year as produce sales drop

Cuba moved nearly 15 percent less produce through domestic markets during the first six months of the year, compared with the same period in 2017, signaling another bad year for its agricultural sector, according to a government report. The market sales in the report, issued over the weekend, account for 10 percent to 15 percent of agricultural output, according to a local expert, who requested anonymity due to restrictions on talking with journalists. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 17 - Malaysian Cash Market Prices for Palm Oil Unavailable
Data for Malaysian cash market prices for palm oil are unavailable due to a Malaysia Day holiday. Market will resume on Tuesday, September 18th.

Sep 17 - Australia's biggest wheat region hit by frost; hurts export prospects

Widespread frost has dented hopes that wheat growing areas in Australia's west could provide a much needed boost to output, analysts and traders said on Monday, further tightening supplies amid a prolonged drought. Australia, the world's fourth largest wheat exporter, expects production of its largest rural commodity to hit a 10-year low this season at 19.1 million tonnes, as drought across the country's east wilts output.  Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - Traders wary of delays as Russia toughens grain export control

Russia's food safety watchdog has beefed up quality controls on grain exports due to complaints from major buyers and the lower quality of the crop, it said on Friday, adding that the more stringent checks were not aimed at limiting grain exports. Traders have been watching for any changes to regulations because they were used in the past to place informal curbs on exports. Some traders said the new controls were excessive and could cause delivery disruptions on signed contracts. Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - Philippine paddy rice losses from typhoon exceed forecasts

The Philippines lost a total of 250,730 tonnes of paddy rice due to the strong typhoon that hit its northern provinces over the weekend, according to initial official estimates, exceeding a worst-case forecast by 60 percent. The Philippines, one of the world's biggest rice importers, had been under pressure to boost its stocks of the grain even before Typhoon Mangkhut struck, with soaring retail prices helping to push inflation to its highest in nearly a decade. Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - China says battling swine fever is "complex and challenging"

Battling the spread of African swine fever in China is "very complex and challenging", the country's agriculture ministry said after chairing a meeting of over a dozen major government bodies. The meeting on Thursday came as more than a dozen African swine fever outbreaks have been reported across China since early August, mostly on small farms. Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - NOPA August U.S. soy crush seen at 163.870 mln bushels - survey

U.S. soybean plants continued their recent strong crushing pace in August to capitalize on robust profit margins for processing the oilseed into meal and oil, analysts said ahead of a monthly National Oilseed Processors Association (NOPA) report. NOPA members, who handle about 95 percent of all soybeans processed in the United States, likely crushed 163.870 million bushels of soybeans last month, according to an average of estimates given by eight analysts in a Reuters survey. That compares with a crush of 142.424 million bushels in the same month a year earlier, the largest-ever crush for the month of August. Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - Florence seen testing N. Carolina environmental codes on toxic hog waste

Tropical Storm Florence could taint North Carolina waterways with murky coal ash and toxic hog waste as heavy rains test environmental rules written with milder weather in mind, carrying the risk of contaminating water with bacteria like salmonella, officials said on Friday. Many of the state's environmental codes were written to withstand a 25- or 100-year storm. But Florence promises heavy rains that some regions might not see in a thousand years, straining systems meant to keep state residents safe. Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - EU farmers start maize harvest after torrid summer

Harvesting of grain maize is getting off to an early start in the European Union and analysts expect severe summer heat and drought to have hurt yields in countries like France and Germany, and contribute to record import demand. Analyst firm Strategie Grains on Thursday cut its monthly forecast for the EU's grain maize (corn) harvest by nearly 5 percent, citing the effects of the torrid summer in France, Germany, Poland and central Europe. Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - Cargill to pay total of $1.5 mln to Muslim workers in Colorado prayer dispute 

Cargill Meat Solutions will pay a total of $1.5 million to 138 Muslim workers who were fired after walking off the job in a dispute over prayer breaks at a Colorado meat-packing plant in 2015, the company said on Friday. The dispute arose after the workers, mostly Somali immigrants, were dismissed after they staged a three-day walkout over what they said were insufficient prayer breaks at a plant in Fort Morgan, about 75 miles northeast of Denver. Click here to read full stories

Sep 14 - Asia eyes Argentine wheat as drought curbs Australian output

Asian flour millers are expected to seek rare wheat shipments from Argentina in coming months as a second year of drought in traditional supplier Australia curbs supplies. At present, Asian wheat importers, including the world's biggest buyer Indonesia, are buying most of their wheat from the Black Sea region. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - Sonny's roadshow: How Trump's Ag chief sells a trade war to farmers

Breaking off from a tour of dairy operations on a farm in upstate New York, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue tramps across a muddy path to take a sample of sweet corn from an adjacent field. With a wide smile, he shucks the ear and takes a bite, then passes it around to others in the crowd before getting back to his mission: selling farmers on the merits of President Donald Trump's trade war. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - Brazil forward grains sales rise as dollar firms vs real

Brazilian farmers are selling more of next year's soy and corn harvest since the U.S. dollar strengthened past 4 reais in August, driving up the value received by producers pricing the crop in the local currency, according to analysts. Sales of the 2018-19 crop had previously been slow as farmers, concerned over the country's move to set minimum truck freight rates raising transportation costs, held off on signing forward sales contracts. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - Trump says Democrats stalling farm bill, work requirement a must

U.S. President Donald Trump accused Democratic lawmakers on Thursday of stalling major farm legislation and said the work requirements in the bill were imperative. "Senator Debbie Stabenow and the Democrats are totally against approving the Farm Bill. They are fighting tooth and nail to not allow our Great Farmers to get what they so richly deserve. Work requirements are imperative and the Dems are a NO. Not good!" Trump wrote on Twitter. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - Second round of tariff-related aid to farmers may come in December - USDA

A second round of tariff-related aid to U.S. farmers could be announced in December, according to a white paper released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Thursday. The government model used to account for growers' losses may factor in new tariff levels enacted against trade partners, such as China or the European Union, according to the paper. It does not state how much money could be directed to farmers, or how such funds would be split up. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - Strategie Grains cuts EU maize outlook after hot summer

Consultancy Strategie Grains cut its outlook for grain maize production in the European Union by nearly 5 percent as crop conditions continued to deteriorate over the summer due to hot and dry weather in France and central Europe. In a report published on Thursday, the French-based firm estimated this year's grain maize crop in the 28-member bloc at 58.4 million tonnes, down from 61.3 million pegged last month and 59.3 million harvested last year. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - ‘Buyer beware' on Canadian cheese concessions, say European exporters

A trade deal meant to give European cheesemakers more access to the Canadian market is falling short of its promise in its first full year, government data show, frustrating the European industry, which blames a year-old Ottawa quota system. Under the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with the European Union, Canada agreed to more than double tariff-free imports of cheese over five years, starting in September 2017. The new imports will eventually represent about 4 percent of the Canadian cheese market. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - Dryness after summer heatwave seen cutting EU rapeseed sowings

Dry soil after record-breaking European summer heatwaves means farmers have been unable to plant all the rapeseed they wished, experts said on Thursday. The ground may have been too dry for sowings in parts of the top four producers Germany, France, Britain and Poland. High grain prices after the poor European Union crop this summer also made some farmers turn to cereals from rapeseed, Europe’s main oilseed for edible oil and biodiesel production. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - France calls for measures after African swine fever found in Belgium

France called on Thursday for protective measures following reports that African swine fever had been detected in wild boars in Belgium near the French border. The disease, highly viral for pigs but not dangerous for humans, has been spreading in the European Union, mainly in the eastern part of the bloc where it has led to the culling of hundred thousands of animals. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 13 - USDA raises U.S. corn, soy harvest view on record yields

The U.S. Agriculture Department on Wednesday issued a surprise increase to its corn harvest forecast due to expectations of record yields in key production areas such as Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska and Indiana. Soybean yields were seen at an all-time high, with the production outlook raised above its already record-high forecast. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - INTL FCStone pegs Australian wheat production below official forecasts

Commodity brokerage INTL FCStone on Thursday pegged Australian wheat production below recently reduced official estimates, as a crippling drought in the country's east shows no signs of easing. The brokerage forecast Australian wheat output for the year to end-September 2019 at 18.78 million tonnes, below Australia's latest official estimate of 19.1 million tonnes. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - Argentina soy harvest expected to reach 50 mln tonnes in 2018-19

Argentina's soy harvest is expected to reach 50 million tonnes during the 2018-19 season, while estimates for corn production fell to 43 million tonnes, down from around 45 million tonnes previously, the Rosario grains exchange said on Wednesday. An exchange spokesperson said predictions for wheat production during the 2018-19 season remained at 21 million tonnes, but would be updated in October. Farmers had planted 6.32 million hectares with wheat this year, up from 5.7 million hectares the prior season. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - Soybean market reacts generously to bearish USDA data -Braun

Chicago-traded soybean futures were able to combat ballooning supply numbers from the U.S. government on Wednesday, but the U.S. harvest may simply be too big, even despite some renewed demand hopes. The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Wednesday pegged U.S. soybean yield for the 2018 harvest at 52.8 bushels per acre, higher than both the trade guess and last month’s 51.6 bpa. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - Commodities giant ADM ramps up ethanol sales in Chicago, irking rivals

Archer Daniels Midland Co has sold unusually high volumes of ethanol into the Chicago market since late last year as export markets dried up, driving down prices in the U.S. Midwest and angering the company's rivals, according to traders and regulatory data. The Illinois-based global commodities powerhouse, a major ethanol producer, accounted for roughly 61 percent of the 9.5 million barrels sold at the Chicago hub between November and August, according to the data reviewed by Reuters. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - France seen raising wheat exports after avoiding worst of weather

France, the European Union's biggest grain producer, could boost exports of wheat and barley this season after its harvest was less affected by severe weather than other EU states, the country's farm office said on Wednesday. In its first supply-and-demand outlook for the 2018/19 July-June season, FranceAgriMer projected French soft wheat exports outside the EU at 8.5 million tonnes, up from 8.1 million in 2017/18, while barley exports to non-EU destinations were forecast to rise to 3 million tonnes from 2.5 million. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - Dry weather poses risk to Russia's 2019 grain crop - analysts

Dry weather in some Russian regions is posing a risk to next year's grain crop in one of the world's largest wheat exporters, analysts and an industry lobby group said. Russian farmers are sowing winter grains for the next year's crop while the country is gathering this year's harvest. Officials expect the harvest to fall to 105 million tonnes in 2018 from a record 135 million tonnes in 2017. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - Brazil prosecutors seek leniency talks with BRF in food fraud probe

Brazilian federal prosecutors probing whether chicken processor BRF SA and certain laboratories colluded to cheat on food safety tests are seeking cooperation from the firms in return for more lenient penalties, a federal prosecutor told Reuters in an interview. Prosecutors had found "grave irregularities" and would demand that the companies carry out a root-and-branch restructure as part of any leniency deal, federal prosecutor Lyana Helena Joppert Kalluf said last week. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - Ukraine cheers investments from IKEA, Saudi Arabia's SALIC

Ukrainian investment announcements by Swedish furniture retailer IKEA and the Saudi Agricultural and Livestock Investment Company (SALIC) are votes of confidence in the country's business climate, President Petro Poroshenko said on Wednesday. Ukraine is battling to shake off an image of entrenched corruption that has long deterred foreign investors and held up the disbursement of billions of dollars worth of aid from the International Monetary Fund. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - China's small farmers pose huge challenge in swine fever battle

Even after 14 outbreaks of African swine fever across China in just over a month, pig farmer Wang Wu does not believe the threat to his livelihood is real. "I heard about the African swine fever thing. But then people said it was just rumour. It was fake news," said Wang, who raises about 60 pigs in a village near Harbin, capital of China's northeastern Heilongjiang province. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - China slashes 2018/19 soybean import forecast as U.S. trade war crimps buying 

China on Wednesday slashed its forecast for 2018/19 soybean imports as farmer reduce their use of the bean in animal feed because of the Sino-U.S. trade conflict, leading the government to raise its supply deficit estimate. Imports of soybeans in the crop year that starts on Oct. 1 will be 83.65 million tonnes, down 10.2 million tonnes from last month's estimate of 93.85 million tonnes, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said in its monthly crop report. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - U.S. farmers scramble to harvest crops as hurricane looms

As powerful Hurricane Florence crept closer to the southeastern United States on Tuesday, farmers in North Carolina rushed to harvest corn and tobacco and stock up on pig rations, while the danger of deadly flooding threatened a state where millions of farm animals are housed. The forecasts for devastating rain and winds also had WH Group's Smithfield Foods, the largest U.S. pork processor, planning to shut two of its North Carolina plants - including the world's biggest hog slaughterhouse.  Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - Canada ready to allow U.S. dairy access in NAFTA talks - sources

Canada is ready to offer the United States limited access to the Canadian dairy market as a concession in negotiations to rework the North American Free Trade Agreement, two Canadian sources with direct knowledge of Ottawa's negotiating strategy said on Tuesday. U.S. President Donald Trump said at the White House that trade talks with Canada were going well and that Ottawa wants to make a deal. Chrystia Freeland, Canada's foreign minister, returned to Washington on Tuesday for talks with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - Britain outlines post-Brexit farm policy in bill

Britain will introduce legislation on Wednesday for agricultural policy after it leaves the European Union that will link support for farmers to the provision of public benefits such as tackling climate change or preserving beautiful landscapes. The Agriculture Bill, primarily covering England, will provide the basis for policy in a sector which for decades has been controlled by the European Union. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - Brazil raises soy export projection, end-stocks lowest on record

Brazil's government on Tuesday raised by 2 million tonnes its projection for soybean exports in the 2017/18 crop to 76 million tonnes amid strong Chinese demand, reducing the crop's end-stocks to the lowest on record. Agricultural statistics agency Conab raised by 300,000 tonnes its projection for the country's 2017/18 soybean crop from August to 119.3 million tonnes, the second-highest output ever, but even with that increase soy end-stocks fell to 434,000 tonnes from 638,000 tonnes last month. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - Smithfield Foods to shut world's largest hog plant before Florence hits

Smithfield Foods, a unit of China's WH Group, will shut down the world's largest hog slaughter plant in Tar Heel, North Carolina, on Thursday and Friday due to Hurricane Florence, a company spokeswoman said on Tuesday. The powerful storm was expected to hit North Carolina on Friday. The Tar Heel facility can slaughter 35,000 hogs per day and has 4,400 employees, Smithfield spokeswoman Diana Souder said in an email. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - Malaysia's end-Aug palm oil stocks hit 7-month top - MPOB

Palm oil end-stocks in Malaysia rose to a seven-month high in August, above market expectations, as output levels increased and exports fell, according to official data on Wednesday. Inventories in the world's second largest palm producer rose to 2.49 million tonnes, up 12.4 percent from the previous month, Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB) data showed. The level was the highest since January, while the monthly increase was the biggest since November. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - Australia cuts wheat forecast by nearly 13 percent as drought wilts rural economy

Australia lowered its wheat forecast by nearly 13 percent on Tuesday as a crippling drought across the country's east coast has cut output from the world's fourth-largest exporter to a 10-year low. Wheat production during the 2018/19 season will total 19.1 million tonnes, the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) said. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - Meat tracking key to fight African swine fever - OIE

Tracking meat and meat products from pigs infected with African swine fever is key to fight the spread of the highly viral disease as it can survive in processed food, the Deputy head of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Monday. African swine fever (ASF) has spread rapidly in eastern Europe and China, the world's largest pork producer, where new cases are appearing every day and the disease is travelling vast distances.  Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - China detects new African swine fever case in Anhui province

China on Monday reported another outbreak of the deadly African swine fever in the eastern province of Anhui as the highly contagious disease spreads further in cities that have already reported infections. China's Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said in a statement on its website that 23 hogs have died and 63 were infected in the new case in Tongling city in Anhui. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - Brazil farmers vie for soy contract during U.S.-China trade war

Brazilian farmers said they are seeking support to develop a soybean futures contract that would ease deals between Brazil, the world's largest soy exporter, and top importer China at a time of heightened U.S.-China trade tensions. A growing chorus of growers, analysts, bankers and even a U.S. Department of Agriculture economist said it would make sense to establish such a contract to hedge growing risks as Brazil and U.S. soybean prices diverge. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - U.S. crop ratings seen declining; corn harvest under way - poll

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is likely to project a slight decline in U.S. corn and soybean condition ratings following rains that soaked maturing crops in the Midwest last week, according to a Reuters poll on Monday. The USDA in a weekly report due at 3 p.m. CDT (2000 GMT) is likely to rate 66 percent of the U.S. corn crop and 65 percent of the soybean crop in good to excellent condition, each down 1 percentage point from a week earlier, according to an average of estimates by 11 analysts. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - Russian deputy PM sees 2018/19 grain exports at 30 mln T

Russia is expected to harvest 105 million tonnes of grain, leaving 30 million tonnes available for export in the 2018/19 marketing season that started on July 1, its deputy prime minister in charge of agriculture said on Monday. The country's 2018 grain crop is forecast to decline from a record 135 million tonnes in 2017. It will still be a large crop compared with the average of the past five years but the activity of the main exporters for the 2018/19 season is being monitored closely by the agriculture ministry. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - Crop Watch: Corn harvest to begin this week with Indiana, Kansas - Braun

The first Crop Watch 2018 corn fields should be harvested this week in Kansas and Indiana without too much delay. Last week’s plentiful rains left over from Tropical Storm Gordon did not cause as many problems as initially feared. The corn harvest should continue with Illinois late next week and Iowa in the last week of the month. Ohio should follow around Oct. 1, and Minnesota is likely to close things out around Oct. 20. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - British beef would be "uncompetitive overnight" after no-deal Brexit - food officials

Some British food, including beef and lamb, would become "uncompetitive overnight" on foreign markets in the event of a no-deal Brexit, food industry representatives told lawmakers on Monday. Crashing out of the EU without an agreement would leave producers with customs arrangements set by the World Trade Organization - where agricultural tariffs could top 50 percent, Sarah Baker, from the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board, said. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - China's August soy imports jump as buying from Brazil continues

China imported 9.15 million tonnes of soybeans in August, up 14 percent from July, customs data showed on Saturday, as buyers in the world's top importer continued to buy from Brazil after Beijing imposed tariffs on U.S. shipments. August figures were up from last year's 8.44 million tonnes. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - U.S. agriculture chief says NAFTA deal must end Canada's milk protein scheme

Canada must end its low-price milk proteins policy to reach a U.S.-Canadian deal to update the North American Free Trade Agreement, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said. Canada has encouraged overproduction and flooded export markets for milk proteins used in cheese and yogurt, hurting U.S. dairy farmers, Perdue said in an interview aired on Sunday on C-SPAN television. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - Amid trade row, China to allow soybean imports from Ethiopia

China will start allowing soybean imports from Ethiopia, customs authorities said on Friday, as the world's top importer seeks to reduce its reliance on supplies of the oilseed from the United States amid a trade row with Washington. The move would diversify soybean imports origins for China, and help meet domestic demand, the General Administration of Customs said in a statement on its website. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - Funds sour on CBOT grains, soy against trade consensus - Braun

Speculators were pegged last week by trade sources as net buyers of Chicago-traded corn, soybeans and wheat, but their corn views did not budge, and they were instead net sellers of soy and wheat. Despite a drop in exportable wheat supply worldwide, U.S. exporters have yet to cash in on the deal and total sales for the current marketing year sit at a nine-year low. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - "No progress" on financing of Russia-Iran wheat deal - Iran industry group

Plans for a deal under which Russia and Khazakstan are to supply wheat to Iran have stalled as "no progress" has been made in its financing, the secretary general of the Iran Federation of Food Industry Associations said. Talks on the deal began six months ago. It would see Russia and Kazakhstan supplying wheat to Iranian flour millers, who in turn would supply flour to Iraq -- a market dominated by Turkey.  Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - Japan finds first swine fever case in 26 years, but not African fever

Japan's agriculture ministry said on Sunday it had confirmed the country's first outbreak of swine fever in 26 years and suspended exports of pork and wild boar meat. The fever, a different kind from the African swine fever that has broken out in China, was found in a farm in central Japan's Gifu city, the ministry said. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - Australia's drought could produce a corker vintage

If Australia's big dry has a silver lining, it'll be worth cellaring, according to vintners, who are scrambling to irrigate vines while preparing for a smaller but sweeter vintage. Spring, when vine buds burst into fruit and flower, has come with much of Australia's east gripped by a drought that has turned usually fertile pastures barren.  Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - India summer crop sowing edges up; rice area expands 2.3 pct y/y

Indian farmers have planted summer-sown crops on 104.17 million hectares as of Sept. 7, up 0.2 percent from a year earlier, government data showed. Cotton sowing was down 2.4 percent, while rice planting rose 2.3 percent. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - African swine fever in China almost certain to spread in Asia - FAO

The African swine fever spreading rapidly in China is "here to stay", the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization said on Friday, adding that it was almost certain to spread to other Asian countries. The fever was first detected in China in early August and has been found in 18 farms or abattoirs in six provinces, with many cases more than a 1,000 kms (621 miles) apart, the FAO said in a statement. Click here to read full stories

Sep 07 - Palm Oil Drops Ahead of Malaysian Holiday  

Palm-oil prices continue to feel profit-taking ahead of a 4-day holiday weekend in Malaysia and export estimates for the start of this month. Shipments improved at the end of August. Bursa Malaysia benchmark futures are down 0.6% at MYR2,264/ton.

Sep 07 - New Zealand Lamb Prices Continue to Rise (ASB Bank DJ)
New Zealand lamb prices have continued to run higher, climbing some 4% more to around NZ$8.40/kilogram. It indicates "generally healthy global economic growth," says ASB Bank. It adds while the outlook for lamb prices is healthy, risks are growing amid the prospect of "a full-blown US-China trade war." New Zealand is the world's largest lamb exporter.

Sep 07 - Drought to Push Down Australian Cattle Numbers (USDA)
The USDA sees Australian cattle numbers being 25.3 million in Jan. 1, versus 25.5 million a year earlier, in the wake of the widespread drought in country's 2 major cattle-producing states. That should result in exports dropping 7% to 1.51 million metric tons for all of 2019 from this year's estimated level. Australia is one of the world's largest beef exporters, so less from it should help prices globally.

Sep 07 - China's vast pig market in lockdown as African swine fever spreads

For pig trader Fang, the discovery of the deadly African swine fever in China last month has brought his once booming business to a sudden halt. From northeast Liaoning province, Fang used to truck up to 600 pigs a day as far away as Guangdong, some 2,700 km (1,680 miles) to the south. But an outbreak of the highly contagious disease means transport of pigs out of Liaoning has been banned. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 07 - Australia's top wheat exporting state set for near-record crop in wake of rains

Western Australia, the country's biggest wheat exporting state, is poised for near-record harvests of the crop this year after rains in the region in August, even as the eastern grain belt grapples with its second year of punishing drought. Wheat yields in the state, a key supplier to the world's biggest importer Indonesia, are expected to be better than average in most areas, analysts and traders said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 07 - Informa raises U.S. 2018 corn, soy yield forecasts - trade

Private analytics firm Informa Economics revised its forecast for the U.S. 2018 corn yield upward to 178.8 bushels per acre (bpa) from 176.0 bpa previously, and raised its U.S. soybean yield forecast to 52.9 bpa from 50.0 bpa, trade sources said on Thursday. Informa projected U.S. 2018 corn production at 14.621 billion bushels and soybean production at 4.698 billion bushels, the sources said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 07 - Brazil minimum freight rates hurt port cargos - association chief

Brazil's policy of setting minimum freight rates is reducing the volume of cargo at Brazilian ports as farmers and agricultural exporters have difficulty arranging transportation at higher cost, according to the head of a Brazilian ports association. The country instituted minimum rates for freight above the previous market rate as part of a deal to end a truckers' strike over high diesel prices in May.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 07 - Louis Dreyfus opens new oilseed plant in China's Tianjin

Global grains trader Louis Dreyfus Company (LDC) opened its new oilseed processing facility in the northern city of Tianjin as part of its expansion in the world's top consumer of soybeans, the company said. The plant, purchased from Singapore-based Golden Agri-Resources last year, has a daily crushing capacity of 4,000 tonnes and oil refining capacity of 1,200 tonnes. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Cargill hedge fund CarVal says rejected approach by Schroders

British asset manager Schroders expressed interest in buying CarVal Investors in May but the hedge fund is owned by U.S. agri group Cargill said it was not for sale, a CarVal executive said. CarVal, with $11.6 billion under management placing it in the top 2 percent of global hedge funds, would have been a major acquisition for Schroders as it expands its product range. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - U.S. corn, soy shippers post banner summer as trade concerns loom - Braun

The United States has been the best source for thrifty corn and soybean buyers in recent months, and the low prices-ample supply combination allowed U.S. exporters to continue their string of record months in July. Going forward, the outlook is bright for corn shippers as U.S. supply is the cheapest and most plentiful.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Brazil hikes freight rates 5 pct, lifting agriculture costs

Brazil's transportation regulator on Wednesday raised minimum truck freight rates by 5 percent on average, as the government walks a tight line between the demands of the agriculture and trucking industries following a truckers' strike in May. Exporters group Anec criticized the higher rates for raising costs for the country's grain sector by 3.4 billion reais ($818 million), while truckers association Abcam said the adjustment did not go far enough. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Egypt's GASC buys 60,000 T of Russian wheat

Egypt's state grains buyer, the General Authority for Supply Commodities (GASC), said on Wednesday it had bought 60,000 tonnes of Russian wheat in an international purchase tender. GASC is seeking the wheat for shipment over Oct. 21-30, it said without providing further details. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Australia's GrainCorp hikes FY18 earnings outlook on strong grain trading

GrainCorp Ltd Australia's biggest listed bulk grain handler, on Thursday raised its full year underlying net profit and underlying core earnings outlook, helped by a strong performance from its international grain trading book and global malt business. The firm said in a statement it now expects underlying net profit of A$60 million to A$75 million ($43 million to $54 million) for the year to end-September 2018, above the A$50 million to A$70 million range it re-confirmed in May. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - China finds African swine fever in Anhui farm; 10th outbreak in a month

China has detected an outbreak of African swine fever on a farm in Anhui province, its tenth case since the first outbreak of the deadly virus was discovered just over a month ago, state broadcaster China Central Television said on Thursday. The report said 22 hogs have died and 62 were infected on the farm in Fengyang county in the city of Chuzhou, which has 886 pigs. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - U.S. wheat export group to close Russian office

U.S. Wheat Associates (USW), a trade group that promotes U.S. exports, is closing its office in Moscow after 26 years, it said in a statement, reflecting the emergence of Russia as a major wheat exporter. Russian wheat production has soared in the past few years. As a result, the country became the world's largest wheat exporter in the 2017/18 marketing season, which ended on June 30, increasing supplies to markets traditionally dominated by the United States. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Protesters block Iraqi commodities port

Protesters blocked the entrance to Iraq's Umm Qasr commodities port on Wednesday to demand better services, port employees and local government officials said, raising the stakes in some of the worst unrest in southern cities in months. The move came hours after stone-throwing protesters set fire to the main provincial government building in the oil hub of Basra, Iraq's second largest city. The highway from Basra to Baghdad was cut off by demonstrators. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Trump says Congress should pass farm bill with food stamp work requirements

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday the final agriculture bill that the U.S. Congress sends to him to sign into law should include work requirements for people receiving food stamps, the grocery subsidies officially called "SNAP." "#FarmBill with SNAP work requirements will bolster farmers and get America back to work. Pass the Farm Bill with SNAP work requirements!" Trump tweeted, as the two chambers of Congress begin reconciling separate bills that they recently passed into a single piece of legislation for him to sign. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Saudi Arabia sets Nov. 30 qualification deadline for flour mills sale

Saudi Arabia's state grain buyer SAGO has set a Nov. 30 deadline for qualification applications from investors interested in the sale of its flour mills, it said on Wednesday. The sale, among the kingdom's first privatisations and a litmus test for other state asset sales to follow, began its so-called qualifying phase on Aug. 26.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - K+S to cut further costs this year as drought hampers production

German minerals miner K+S plans further cost savings this year to achieve its profit guidance as it grapples with a severe drought that has hampered production at its main German mine. K+S shut down production at its Wintershall site at the end of August as exceptionally low water levels in the Werra river have restricted its ability to dispose of waste water. The site remains offline. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 05 - UN holds emergency meeting in Asia as China battles African swine fever

The United Nations is holding an emergency meeting this week with animal health experts in Asia to discuss the threat of African swine fever after the first outbreak of the disease in the region was discovered in China last month. China has detected eight cases of the highly contagious virus since discovering the first outbreak on Aug. 3, raising concerns about its spread in the world's largest pork producer and beyond its borders into Southeast Asia.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 05 - China soybean imports from U.S. to plunge in 2018/19 - Jiusan exec

China will almost entirely replace its soybean imports from the United States with Brazilian beans and other origins in the upcoming season, but may run out of the oilseed in early 2019, said an executive with a top crusher on Tuesday. The forecast was one of the most bearish yet on the impact of the Sino-U.S. trade war for American farmers. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 05 - Crop Watch-Storm Gordon's deluge largely unhelpful for corn, soy yields - Braun

The U.S. Crop Watch corn and soybean fields are moving closer to the finish line, and in most cases reaching or expected to reach maturity a week or two earlier than normal. Yield expectations remain strong, but some states, including Kansas, Iowa, and Illinois, will be grappling this week with heavy late-season rainfall. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 05 - Brazil may become 2nd-largest cotton exporter in 2018/19 - trade group

Brazil could become the world's second-largest cotton exporter in the 2018/2019 crop cycle, jumping ahead one position to surpass India in the global rankings, Brazilian trade group Abrapa said on Tuesday during an industry event. Brazil is expected to export 1.12 million tonnes of cotton lint in the 2018/19 harvest, which would place it second to only the United States, Abrapa's executive director Márcio Portocarrero said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 05 - Egypt's GASC seeks wheat for Oct. 21-30 shipment

Egypt's General Authority for Supply Commodities (GASC) set a tender on Tuesday to buy an unspecified amount of wheat from global suppliers for shipment from Oct. 21-30. GASC Vice Chairman Ahmed Youssef said the authority was seeking to buy cargoes of soft and/or milling wheat from the United States, Canada, Australia, France, Germany, Poland, Argentina, Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary and Paraguay. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 05 - Weekend rains soak U.S. Corn Belt; Wisconsin soy yields threatened

Heavy rains soaked the western U.S. Midwest this weekend and more showers were expected as remnants of Tropical Storm Gordon move into the Corn Belt this week, slowing the advancing maturity of corn and soybean crops, meteorologists said. Storms brought 2 to 5 inches (5 to 13 cm) of rain this past weekend from Nebraska to Wisconsin and northern Illinois, with some local amounts reaching 8 inches (20 cm), World Weather Inc meteorologist Andy Karst said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - Argentine farmers seen delaying wheat sales under new tax regime

Argentine farmers may delay wheat sales and plant less corn this year after the government announced a roughly 10 percent export tax on the grains on Monday as part of an austerity program designed to halt a run on the peso currency, growers and consultants said. The measures announced by President Mauricio Macri's government include a tax of four pesos per dollar on wheat and corn shipments. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - China reports new African swine fever case as virus spreads

China reported another outbreak of deadly African swine fever late on Monday, its third new case in two days, as the highly contagious disease spreads rapidly through the world's top pork producer. The latest case, the eighth since the virus was first reported in the country a month ago, was found in the city of Wuxi, the agriculture ministry said, two hours drive west of Shanghai in eastern China's Jiangsu province. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - Funds cling to bullish wheat stance, but wary of corn, soy - Braun 

Speculators are not yet ready to ditch the wildly bullish wheat story, though they remain cautiously bearish toward Chicago-traded corn and soybeans. In the week ended Aug. 28, hedge funds and other money managers cut their net long position in CBOT wheat futures and options to 51,180 contracts from 60,812 in the previous week, according to data from the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - Strategie Grains cuts EU rapeseed outlook for 7th consecutive month

Strategie Grains has lowered its forecast for the 2018 European Union rapeseed harvest for a seventh consecutive month mainly due to a downward revision in Germany. The France-based consultancy in its monthly oilseed report said it expected EU rapeseed production of 19.62 million tonnes, down from an estimate of 19.95 million a month ago and 11.5 percent smaller than the 2017 crop. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - China will not face soybean shortage in Q4 - China soybean assn

China will not face a shortage of soybeans in the fourth quarter, despite tariffs on imports of the oilseed from the United States related to the Sino-U.S. trade war, an official from the China Soybean Industry Association said on Tuesday. The U.S. typically supplies about a third of China's soybean imports but Beijing has levied steep tariffs on its beans, which has halted shipments to China. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - Russia meets grain traders, sees no need to limit exports

Russia's Agriculture Ministry does not see a need to impose an export duty on grains or to curb grain exports in any other way, it said in a statement after a meeting with exporters on Monday. Chicago wheat prices - a global benchmark for grains - were supported last week by speculation that Russia, one of the world's largest wheat exporters, might move to limit wheat exports later in the season due to a lower crop. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - Brazil court overturns ban on weed-killer glyphosate

A Brazilian court on Monday overturned an injunction banning products containing the popular weed-killer glyphosate, knocking down a previous ruling that had been set to disrupt the soy planting season set to begin this month. A Brazilian judge ruled last month to halt the registration of new glyphosate-based products in the country and to suspend existing registrations after 30 days, until health agency Anvisa issues a pending ruling on its safety. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 03 - China bans pig shipments from regions hit by African swine fever as 6th case detected

China imposed a ban on Sunday on transporting pigs and pork products from provinces which have reported outbreaks of African swine fever and will shut live hog markets in the regions, as authorities found a sixth case of the highly contagious virus. The measures announced by the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs are the most drastic since the country discovered its first-ever case of the deadly virus a month ago, and come amid growing concerns about its spread through the world's largest hog herd. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 03 - Brazil prosecutors hope to strike deal lifting glyphosate injunction

Brazil federal prosecutors are negotiating with health authority Anvisa and the agriculture ministry to reach a deal that could lift an injunction against the popular weed-killer glyphosate, a prosecutor on the case told Reuters on Friday. Prosecutors have requested a meeting next week to discuss a deal just as a ban on glyphosate products already on the market is expected to go into effect on Monday, Brasilia-based prosecutor Luciana Loureira Oliveira said by telephone. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 03 - Argentina IMF deal could mean reversal of Macri's grain tax cuts

As Argentina drafts plans to cut its budget deficit to convince nervous investors it can pay its debts, President Mauricio Macri is under increasing pressure to reverse one of his signature policies, cutting farm export taxes. Treasury Minister Nicolas Dujovne promised to announce measures on Monday to reduce the South American country's 2019 primary deficit - its borrowing needs before debt servicing - in an effort to stem the slide in the peso, one of the world's worst performing currencies this year. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 03 - Canadian canola, wheat harvests smaller than expected after dry summer

Canadian farmers will harvest less canola and wheat than expected, and fall short of last year's production, a Statistics Canada report showed on Friday. Hot, dry weather across the Prairies was expected to curb yields, although patchy rains left crops in better shape in some areas. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 03 - Algeria's 2017 grain harvest rises by 74 pct - minister

Algeria's grain harvest has reached 6 million tonnes, a 74.4 percent rise from the last year's harvest, Agriculture Minister Abdelkader Bouazghi said on Saturday. This year's production was the highest since 2012 when the North African country harvested 6.9 million tonnes. The government had forecast expected production for 2018 to be better than last year's 3.5 million tonnes due to sufficient rainfall. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 03 - EU slashes 2018 wheat export estimate by 5.5 mln tonnes

The European Commission on Friday slashed its monthly forecast of common wheat exports from the European Union in the 2018/2019 season, due partly to a cut in its output estimate, in a further sign of tight world wheat supplies. In supply and demand forecasts released on Friday, the Commission pegged EU common wheat exports this season at 20.0 million tonnes, down from 25.5 million estimated in July and now below the 21.3 million shipped last season. Click here to read full stories.