Grains, Seeds, Vegoils & Meals

Oct 17 - U.S. wheat exports to rise in second half of season - USDA official 

U.S. wheat exports look set for a strong second half of the 2018/19 season when shipments from Russia are expected to slow, the chairman of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) World Agricultural Outlook Board said on Tuesday. The USDA is forecasting U.S. wheat exports in the 2018/19 season will rise to 27.9 million tonnes, up from 24.52 million tonnes in the previous season. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 17 - Shades of 2014 lurking in CBOT soybean market - Karen Braun

When the Chicago Board of Trade closed for business on Monday, November soybean futures ended up 24 cents on the day, and nearly 80 cents off the contract’s all-time low from a month earlier. But last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture raised domestic soybean ending stocks for the 2018-19 marketing year to an eye-popping 885 million bushels, more than double the previous year’s inventory and 54 percent larger than the record high. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 17 - Brazil mill says Russian wheat buy was good, would buy more at right price 

One of the three Brazilian wheat mills involved in a deal to import a cargo of Russian wheat this year, the first such deal since 2010, said the quality was good and that it would possibly buy again if the price is right. Earlier this year, Brazilian wheat mills J Macedo, Dias Branco and Grande Moinho Cearense made a joint purchase of 25,000 tonnes of Russian wheat via the Kaliningrad port for discharge in the Northeast Brazilian port of Fortaleza. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 17 - Brazil front-runner's planned ministry merger could hurt farm trade - official 

Brazilian far-right presidential front-runner Jair Bolsonaro's proposal to merge the farm and environment ministries could hurt Brazil's quest for 10 percent of the global farm trade, the country's deputy agriculture minister said on Tuesday. Eumar Novacki said that he was not opposed to the idea of combining the ministries but that it would likely be viewed abroad as a step backward in the country's environmental protection and hurt consumer perceptions of its agriculture industry. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 17 - Malaysia's biodiesel output, exports set to hit records - industry body 

Malaysian biodiesel production is likely to hit record levels this year and next, with 2018 exports on track to double from 2017, pushed up as higher oil prices boost the appeal of biofuels, the head of an industry association said on Wednesday. The Southeast Asian nation is the world's No.2 producer of palm oil, which can be used as feedstock to make the bio components of biodiesel. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 17 - India aims to cut stubble burning in key states by 70 pct, but experts sceptical 

India aims to reduce stubble burning, a major source of pollution during the winter months, by 70 percent in its top two farm states this year, a top government official said on Tuesday, but experts questioned whether the target was credible. Stubble burning in Punjab and Haryana fell between Sept. 30 and Oct. 14 by more than 28 and 44 percent respectively from the year-earlier period, the official said. He didn't wish to be identified in line with government policy. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 17 - China's Sept pig herd down 1.8 pct y/y - Agri ministry 

China's September pig herd fell 1.8 percent from a year earlier but was up 0.8 percent on-month, data from the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs showed Sow herds dropped 4.8 percent in September from a year ago, and slipped 0.3 percent from the previous month, the ministry said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Egypt studying wheat hedging, still buying spot 

Egypt, the world's largest wheat importer, is studying the possibility of hedging against the rise in global prices of the grain, Supply Minister Ali Moselhy said on Monday. "Until now we are buying spot ... there is a working group formed within the finance ministry to study this (hedging) ... but to this moment no decision has been taken," Moselhy told a news conference in Cairo. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - NOPA September soy crush tops expectations at 160.779 mln bushels 

U.S. processors crushed a larger-than-expected 160.779 million bushels of soybeans in September, the largest-ever processing volume for the month, the National Oilseed Processors Association (NOPA) said on Monday. The figure was up from the 158.885 million bushels processed in August and well above the September 2017 crush of 136.419 million bushels, according to NOPA, whose members handle about 95 percent of all soybeans processed in the United States. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Brazil soy planting proceeds at record pace - consultancy 

Brazilian farmers are planting the new soy crop at a record pace, reaching 20 percent of the projected area by Thursday, consultancy AgRural said on Monday. The previous record pace was in 2016, when farmers had advanced to 18 percent of the area by this time of the year. Last season, they were at only 12 percent of plantings. The five-year average is 10 percent. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - China's Dabeinong reports suspected African swine fever case on related farm - media 

One of China's top animal feed producers said on Tuesday an affiliated firm has culled nearly 20,000 pigs due to a suspected case of African swine fever, according to a report by the China Securities Journal. Beijing Dabeinong Technology Group Co Ltd reported the information to investors in an online platform on Tuesday, the state-owned journal said. The company could not be reached for comment by Reuters. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Crop Watch: Rain, snow stall harvest in Western Corn Belt: Karen Braun 

The five Crop Watch producers west of the Mississippi River reported minimal to no harvest activity over the past week due to saturated field conditions and more unwelcome precipitation. This includes central Kansas, southern Minnesota, northeast Nebraska, east central North Dakota and east central Iowa. The Ohio soybeans were cut on Wednesday with above average results, but expectations for the Minnesota corn and Nebraska soybeans declined on disappointing adjacent yields and crop damage, respectively. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Hi-tech peer-to-peer networks let Nigerian farmers log on for cash 

It looked like the end had arrived for Adewale Fatai's chicken farm. Money was running out. Built to house 30,000 chickens, the farm was producing fewer than 2,000 chicks. His family had no funds to lend, and Nigeria's banks weren't interested. Instead, he went online. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Expanding ethanol sales would have limited U.S. market impact - analysts 

The Trump administration's plan to allow year-round sales of higher-grade corn ethanol would have limited impact on the depressed U.S. ethanol market, with record supplies and prices for the fuel hovering near the lowest in a decade, analysts said. President Donald Trump announced the decision last week ahead of a campaign trip to Iowa, the top producer of corn and ethanol. With mid-term elections looming, Trump aimed to give a boost to corn producers in the Farm Belt, who helped secure his narrow 2016 election victory. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Brazilian police refer ex-BRF executives to prosecutors in food probe 

Brazilian police have referred two former executives of food processor BRF SA to federal prosecutors in an investigation into food safety that disrupted meat production in 2017, documents seen by Reuters showed on Monday. The allegation is that former BRF Chairman Abilio Diniz and former Chief Executive Officer Pedro de Andrade Faria did not disclose damaging information when they were at the company. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 16 - Beer lovers face price spikes, shortages as climate changes - study 

Climate change will brew trouble for beer lovers in coming decades as it shrinks yields of barley, the top grain used to make the world's most popular alcoholic drink, a study published on Monday said. Extreme weather events featuring both heat waves and droughts will occur as often as every two or three years in the second half of the century if temperatures rise at current rates, the study said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - Strategie Grains raises EU maize crop estimate on strong southeast 

Strategie Grains analysts increased sharply their estimate of this year's maize harvest in the European Union on Friday as bumper yields in southeast Europe were seen offsetting a drought-hit crop further west. The EU's grain maize production in 2018 was now expected to reach 59.4 million tonnes, Strategie Grains said in a monthly report, a 1 million tonne increase from its September forecast and now stable compared with last year's crop. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - Funds flirt with bullish corn territory after U.S. yield cut: Karen Braun 

Speculators have nearly erased bullish views in Chicago-traded corn futures and options after the U.S. government late last week lowered its outlook for the domestic corn harvest. The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Thursday reduced U.S. corn yield to 180.7 bushels per acre from the previous month’s 181.3, against market predictions of an increase. This, along with a boost in domestic demand, caused corn carryout to come in 5.5 percent smaller than expected.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - China's resilient commodity imports show trade war yet to factor: Clyde Russell 

It's tempting to look at the relative resilience of China's imports of major commodities in September and conclude that the world's second-biggest economy is weathering the trade dispute with the United States quite well. The problem with this view is that while the trade conflict certainly looms as an issue in China's commodity trade, it's not yet the driving factor and any strength, or weakness, in various imports is largely a result of different dynamics. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - Trump's ethanol plan: Hype now, legal fights later 

President Donald Trump's hyping of a plan to boost ethanol demand drew cheers at an Iowa rally on Tuesday, but the oil refining industry has promised a lawsuit to block the move, so victory for Midwest farmers is far from certain. Trump on Tuesday indicated that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency should allow for a waiver for higher-ethanol gasoline, known as E15, to be sold all year, which has been prohibited due to smog concerns. He did not mention the threatened lawsuit and was not asked about it. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - NOPA September U.S. soy crush seen at 157.406 mln bushels -survey 

The National Oilseed Processors Association's (NOPA) September soybean crush is expected to be the largest on record for the month as soy plants capitalized on good profit margins for crushing the oilseed, analysts said ahead of a monthly report. NOPA members, who handle about 95 percent of all soybeans processed in the United States, likely crushed 157.406 million bushels of soybeans last month, according to an average of estimates given by nine analysts in a Reuters survey. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - Cambodia rice exports fell 8.4 percent in Jan-Sept 

Cambodia exported 389,264 tonnes of rice in the first nine months of the year, a fall of 8.4 percent compared with the same period last year, official data showed on Monday. Exports to China, Cambodia's top export market, accounted for 96,714 tonnes, data from the Secretariat of One Window Service for Rice Export Formality, a joint private-government working group on rice, showed. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 15 - China reports new African swine fever outbreak in Liaoning province 

China's agriculture ministry said on Monday that 14 pigs have died in a fresh outbreak of African swine fever in the province of Liaoning. The outbreak in the city of Anshan is the fifth reported in the northeastern province. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - USDA makes surprise cuts to U.S. corn, soybean harvest outlooks 

The U.S. Agriculture Department surprisingly trimmed its forecasts for both domestic corn and soybean production on Thursday, with the soy cut stemming from a reduction in acres while the corn harvest will be lower due to smaller-than-expected yields. Soybean production was seen falling from the government's September estimate due to a decrease in harvested acres in key states such as Illinois and Minnesota. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - China's September soybean imports fall, but ahead of expectations 

China's soybean imports fell slightly in September from a year earlier but were ahead of market expectations, boosted by large volumes from Brazil as buyers tried to shore up stocks, customs data showed on Friday. Soybean imports are being closely watched after Beijing in July imposed a 25 percent tariff on U.S. products worth $34 billion, including soybeans, in response to U.S. penalties on Chinese goods worth the same amount. Click here to read full stories.

 

Oct 12 - Did USDA's U.S. corn yield peg post a rare high in September? - Karen Braun 

The corn market exhaled on Thursday as the U.S. government, against expectations, reduced its forecast for the U.S. crop, temporarily curbing fears over “runaway” domestic corn supplies. This was especially important after the Sept. 28 supply shock, in which data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture showed a much larger corn inventory than most market participants assumed. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - Brazil grain production to rise on bumper corn crop - Conab 

Brazilian farmers are expected to harvest up to 238.54 million tonnes of grain in the 2018/19 season, the government said on Thursday, with the South American country potentially breaking its production record thanks to expected corn and soy bumper crops. In the prior season, Brazilian farmers harvested some 227.91 million tonnes of grains like soybeans and corn, said Conab, the government food supply and statistics agency. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - Russian watchdog to check grain loading points 

Russia will inspect grain loading at ports due to complaints from major buyers about falling crop standards, the head of agriculture safety watchdog Rosselkhoznadzor was quoted as saying by the RIA news agency on Thursday.  The agriculture safety watchdog has been stepping up pressure on traders in recent weeks to pay more attention to the quality of grain in their supplies. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - Argentina may see thinner wheat crop in 2018-19 harvest - exchange 

Frost and a lack of rain could scale back Argentina's wheat crop for the 2018-19 season, which is currently seen at a record 19.7 million tonnes, the Buenos Aires Grains Exchange said on Thursday. According to the exchange's weekly report, a lack of moisture in the soil in northern Argentine provinces and late frosts in the central agricultural region could affect crop yields. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - UK wheat crop falls to five-year low - farm ministry 

Britain's farm ministry on Thursday estimated this year's UK wheat crop at a five-year low of 14.09 million tonnes, down 5.1 percent from the prior season. The decline was driven by a 5.3 percent decline in yields to 7.8 tonnes per hectare, which was only partially offset by a marginal 0.3 percent rise in area to 1.80 million hectares. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 12 - Vietnam seeks to reduce reliance on Asian rice markets, raise exports to Africa, Americas 

Vietnam is seeking to reduce its reliance on Asian rice markets while boosting the output of high-quality grain to better position itself in the global market, the government said on Thursday. The Southeast Asian country aims to reduce its rice shipments to Asian markets to 50 percent of its total exports by 2030, from the current of 60 percent, the government said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - Trump trade war delivers farm boom in Brazil, gloom in Iowa 

The Bella Vita luxury condominium tower rises 20 stories over the boomtown of Luís Eduardo Magalhães in northeastern Brazil. Its private movie theater and helipad are symbols of how far this dusty farming community has come since it was founded just 18 years ago. Local soybean producers shell out upwards of a half-million U.S. dollars to live in the complex. Nearby farm equipment sellers, car dealerships and construction supply stores are bustling too. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - Rain slows U.S. corn, soy harvest; disrupts river barge traffic 

Excessive rains across the central United States over the past week have slowed the harvest of corn and soybeans, while rising water levels closed at least three locks on the Upper Mississippi River, a key artery for shipping Midwest grain to U.S. Gulf exporters. Cash bids for corn shipped by barge to the Gulf firmed on Tuesday, reflecting exporter demand and dwindling pipeline supplies as rising river levels slowed barge traffic.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - French wheat exports to gain from Russia supply drop - agency 

A brisk start to France's wheat export season and less competition from Russian supplies led farming agency FranceAgriMer to raise its forecast for French soft wheat exports outside the European Union in 2018/19. FranceAgriMer pegged French soft wheat exports to non-EU destinations at 8.75 million tonnes, up from its initial outlook of 8.5 million in September and well above 8.1 million in 2017/18. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - El Niño set to return before end of the year: John Kemp 

El Niño conditions are developing across the Pacific Ocean, with meteorologists now putting the probability of a full event developing by the end of the year at almost 75 percent. Sea surface temperatures are warming counter-seasonally across much of the equatorial Pacific and trade winds are slackening, both common precursors of an El Niño episode. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - Fat profits: Asian traders cash in as Europe thirsts for waste oils 

Once surreptitiously dumped down drains in the dead of night, Asia's used cooking oil is fast becoming one of the most sought-after commodities in Europe - as a feedstock for biodiesel. Aggressive green energy targets in the European Union that were bolstered further this year are pushing fuel makers to churn out biodiesel containing recycled cooking oils and fats, phasing out the use of fresh vegetable oils in the process by 2030. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - Bayer gets tentative ruling for new trial in weed-killer case 

Bayer AG's Monsanto unit on Wednesday received a tentative ruling for a new trial on the $250 million in punitive damages awarded by a jury to a groundskeeper who alleged the company's glyphosate-based weed killers, including Roundup, caused his cancer. According to a court filing in San Francisco's Superior Court of California, Judge Suzanne Bolanos was considering whether to grant the company's motion for a new trial on the punitive damages. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - Argentina wheat harvest expected to reach 19 mln tonnes in 2018-19 

Argentina's wheat harvest is expected to reach 19 million tonnes during the 2018-19 season, down from 21 million tonnes predicted previously, the Rosario grains exchange said on Wednesday. The exchange's predictions for soy and corn production remained unchanged at 50 million tonnes and 43 million tonnes, respectively. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 11 - Vietnam's rice exports in 2018 seen at $3.2-$3.3 bln, up 26.9 pct y/y 

The value of Vietnam's rice exports in 2018 may rise to between $3.2 billion and $3.3 billion, increasing up to 26.9 percent from $2.6 billion last year, the trade ministry said on Thursday in a statement on its official Facebook page. Vietnam, the world's third-largest rice exporter after India and Thailand, is trying to increase the quality and variety of the rice it exports as well as branding of the grain to boost exports value. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 10 - Trump raises ethanol use in gasoline, appeases farmers ahead of elections 

U.S. President Donald Trump launched an effort on Tuesday to increase ethanol use in the nation's gasoline pool, delivering a long-sought political victory to the country's Farm Belt and angering oil refiners ahead of November's congressional elections. Trump announced the lifting of a ban on summer sales of gasoline blended with 15 percent ethanol, known as E15, at a closed-door meeting at the White House, Republican senators told reporters after the meeting. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 10 - Russia proposes to speed up plans to boost grain exports 

Russia's Agriculture Ministry has proposed speeding up an increase in the country's grain export capacity part of efforts by one of the world's largest wheat exporters to move into new markets. Russia aims to increase its grain export capacity by 25 million tonnes to 77.7 million tonnes by 2024, agriculture minister Dmitry Patrushev said at a meeting with President Vladimir Putin and other officials on Tuesday. Click here to read full stories.

 Oct 10 - EU set to clear start of talks to boost U.S. beef imports 

European Union countries are on the verge of agreeing to start negotiations with the United States to allow more U.S. beef into Europe, in what could be a major move to defuse transatlantic trade tensions. The European Commission sought approval from its 28 member states at the start of September to open negotiations with Washington. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 10 - U.S. Agriculture's Perdue says farmer aid could be less than first estimated 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's $12 billion package to offset farmers losses from the imposition of tariffs American exports could end up shrinking after an agreement to update NAFTA was struck, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said on Tuesday. "We will be recalculating along as we go," Perdue said in a phone interview with Reuters, regarding the second tranche of the planned compensation, estimated at about $6 billion, which was first announced in July after U.S. and China imposed trade tariffs on each other’s imports. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 10 - Brazil's leading candidate would cut environmental fines - advisor 

Brazilian farmers who break environmental laws in sensitive areas like the Amazon rainforest will face fewer fines for their infractions in a possible government of far-right front-running presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro, his top agriculture advisor told Reuters on Tuesday. Nabhan Garcia, a one-time congressman and long-time conservative leader in the agriculture sector and whose name is being floated as Bolsonaro's pick to be his agriculture minister, also confirmed plans to merge Brazil's environment and agriculture ministries. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 10 - Malaysia's palm oil stocks hit 8-month high in September 

Malaysia's palm oil inventories edged up in September to their highest in eight months, surpassing market expectations as production levels came in higher than exports despite a surge in overseas demand, government data showed on Wednesday. Stockpiles in the world's No.2 producer and exporter of palm oil, used to make products ranging from cooking oil to chocolate, rose 1.5 percent from the previous month to 2.54 million tonnes, according to the data from the Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB).  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 10 - Sumitomo takes full ownership of large Brazil ag chemicals seller 

Japan's Sumitomo Corp said on Tuesday that it had acquired the remaining 35-percent stake it did not already own in Agro Amazônia, a leading agricultural products supplier in Brazil's No. 1 soy producing state of Mato Grosso. Terms were not disclosed. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Trump to lift ban on higher-ethanol gasoline ahead of Nov. elections 

U.S. President Donald Trump will seek to lift a federal ban on summer sales of higher-ethanol blends of gasoline on Tuesday, a senior White House official said, delivering on a move long-sought by anxious Midwest farmers ahead of November's elections. The move will be coupled with restrictions on biofuel credit trading sought by merchant refiners like Valero Energy Corp and PBF Energy Inc. Those rules would be aimed at retailers and oil majors accused by merchant refiners of driving up cost of complying with biofuels blending laws. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Crop Watch: Corn, soy harvest stalled in soggy Western Belt - Karen Braun 

No U.S. Crop Watch corn or soybean field was harvested last week as heavy rains, fog and mist kept producers out of the fields for a second straight week. Six of the eight soybean fields will now be cut between two and three weeks later than originally planned due to the soggy conditions. For Crop Watch producers in the Western Corn Belt, including Kansas, Nebraska and North Dakota, weekly feedback included harvest progress in the immediate area falling to multiyear lows and rain volumes and durations were unlike any previously seen. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - China bans pig imports from Japan, Belgium over swine fever 

China banned imports of pigs, wild boars and products from Belgium after an outbreak of African swine fever, as well as imports from Japan after a regular swine fever outbreak, the General Administration of Customs said on Tuesday. The move follows a similar ban on imports from Bulgaria on Monday, and comes as the northeastern province of Liaoning reported a second outbreak of highly contagious African swine fever in two days.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Russian wheat export prices rise further on possible sales curbs 

Russian wheat export prices ended higher for the fourth week in a row, supported by speculation about potential export limits in Russia as the agriculture safety watchdog continued adding pressure on traders, analysts said on Monday. The watchdog last week said it could suspend operations of some grain-loading operations in two of Russia's top grain exporting regions. Some traders interpreted that as another step on Russia's way to potential grain export curbs.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Louis Dreyfus profit slides as soy hedging adds to challenges 

Louis Dreyfus Company's first-half net profit dropped by more than a third as a soybean hedging loss added to pressure from persisting weakness in the commodity giant's core agricultural markets. The earnings slide comes at a sensitive time for the 167-year-old business. It has recently completed its latest management shake-up while controlling shareholder Margarita Louis-Dreyfus needs almost $2 billion to support debt-laden Brazilian sugar unit Biosev and buy out family minorities. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Australia's weather bureau sees 70 pct chance of El Nino in 2018 

A recent warming of the Pacific Ocean has led to a 70 percent chance of an El Nino weather event developing this year, Australia's Bureau of Meteorology said on Tuesday. An El Nino weather event can trigger both floods and drought in different parts of the world, and is associated with warmer, dry weather across the Asia Pacific. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Brazil's BRF says CEO to step down; asset sale push goes on 

Brazilian food processor BRF SA on Monday said its recently named chief executive would step down by mid-2019, adding that it hoped to conclude by year-end asset sales he put in motion as part of a sweeping overhaul. Pedro Parente, a turnaround specialist who joined BRF in June after quitting the top job at state-controlled oil producer Petroleo Brasileiro SA, will stay on as chairman, but said Chief Operating Officer Lorival Luz would succeed him as CEO, with the transition expected to be complete in the middle of next year. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 9 - Brazil's JBS invests $12 mln in expansion, eyes China market

JBS SA, the world's largest meatpacker, is expanding production capacity at two of its Brazilian units as Chinese demand for its beef exports remain strong, the company said in a statement on Monday. The plants, which received combined expansion investments of 45 million reais ($12 million), are located in the state of Minas Gerais, the statement said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 8 - Brazil soy forward sales way ahead of last year - consultancy

Forward sales of the new Brazilian soybean crop are well ahead of last year's levels, as farmers take advantage of favorable prices and the United States-China trade dispute to clinch deals early in the season, consultancy Safras & Mercado said on Friday. Brazilian soybean producers have sold 27.3 percent of the crop that will start to be collected around January, compared with 14.1 percent that had been sold at this time last year, Safras said in a report. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 8 - China soymeal futures rise 2.5 pct to record-high amid trade worries

China soymeal futures climbed more than 2.5 percent on Monday morning to record 3,457  yuan ($501.37) per tonne amid ongoing concerns about trade between China and the United States, a major supplier of soybeans. That would also mark the biggest daily gain since June for the most actively traded contract on the Dalian Commodity Exchange. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 8 - Commodity funds undeterred by huge U.S. corn, soy stocks - Braun 

The U.S. government’s heavy stocks data did not scare investors away from Chicago-traded corn and soybeans last week, as commodity funds covered a total of about 95,000 outright short positions through Oct. 2 in corn, soybeans and soybean oil. On Sept. 28, the U.S. Department of Agriculture placed corn and soybean inventory as of Sept. 1 above trade expectations by some 138 million and 37 million bushels, respectively. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 8 - U.S. ethanol exports to Brazil drop to nearly 3-year low

Exports of corn-based U.S. ethanol to Brazil sank to the lowest levels in nearly three years in August, U.S. Department of Agriculture data showed on Friday. A big Brazilian sugar harvest pressured domestic biofuel prices, making imported ethanol comparatively more expensive than local sugar-based supplies, according to Geoff Cooper, chief executive of the Renewable Fuels Association trade group. Click here to read full stories.

 

Oct 8 - JBS sued by Kentucky woman over ground beef in salmonella recall

A Kentucky woman is suing the U.S. arm of Brazil's JBS SA , alleging she was hospitalized after consuming ground beef produced by the company that was tainted with Salmonella, according to a lawsuit filed on Friday in Arizona state court. The lawsuit comes one day after the U.S. Agriculture Department's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced that JBS Tolleson Inc was voluntarily pulling 6.5 million pounds of ground beef and other raw beef products that had been shipped to stores across the country. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 8 - Wet start seen for South Africa summer rainfall areas, dry second half

South Africa's summer rainfall region, which includes the key maize belt, is expected to have good rain in the first half of the growing season followed by below-normal precipitation as the summer progresses, the Weather Service said on Friday. An El Nino weather pattern is seen occurring in the coming months, which generally heralds drought in southern Africa. The previous one three years ago triggered an historic drought which hit harvests and fueled food inflation in the region. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 8 - Fire hits palm plantation in Egypt's New Valley, 37 hurt -report

Egypt used air force helicopters on Saturday to fight a fire which swept through palm plantations in the southwest of the country, threatening residential areas, state news agency MENA reported. The agency said that at least 37 people were hurt, mostly due to smoke inhalation, by the fire which broke out on Friday near the New Valley provincial village of el-Rashda. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - Informa Economics boosts U.S. corn, soybean harvest estimates

Private analytics firm Informa economics raised its U.S. corn and soybean production forecasts, trade sources said on Thursday. Informa pegged the U.S. corn crop at 14.890 billion bushels, based on an average yield of 182.1 bushels per acre. Soybean production was seen at 4.677 billion bushels, with yields averaging 53.0 bushels per acre. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - U.S. arm of JBS recalls 6.5 mln pounds of beef on salmonella risk

A U.S. unit of Brazil's JBS SA is recalling 6.5 million pounds of beef products processed through an Arizona plant because the meat might be contaminated with salmonella, U.S. government officials said on Thursday. U.S. investigators have identified at least 57 people in 16 states who have become ill due to consuming contaminated ground beef products made from meat traced back to JBS, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - What an impending El Niño may mean for Brazil's soybeans - Braun

Brazilian soybean growers have been blessed with good weather for the last couple of years, allowing harvest volumes to soar to unprecedented levels. But with El Niño on the way, could this trend be in danger? Not necessarily, as the year is off to a terrific start with a quick planting pace and good moisture. But the warm-water El Niño pattern in the Pacific Ocean has not always boded well later in the season for some of Brazil’s key growing regions. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - Brazil soybean exports seen at 79 mln tns in 2019/2020 mkt year - consultancy

Brazilian soybean exports will reach an estimated 79 million tonnes in the 2019/2020 marketing year, consultancy Safras & Mercado said in a statement on Thursday, referring to the period between February 2019 and January 2020. If the United States China continue to spar over trade, Brazilian soybean exports will continue to be strong in the 2018/2019 crop season, which is just starting in Brazil, Safras & Mercado said. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - U.S. working to diversify farm trade away from China - ag chief

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said on Thursday that the United States "probably made a mistake" becoming too trade dependent on China and added that the administration was pursuing trade deals elsewhere. U.S. farmers have been hit hard by the Trump administration's ongoing trade dispute with China, which has shut off billions of dollars worth of agricultural trade between the giant economies. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - Canada dairy farmers unhappy after meeting Trudeau on trade deal

Canadian dairy farmers met Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Thursday to discuss his politically-risky move to open up the protected domestic market to U.S. industry but complained he had not given them details about compensation. As part of the talks to complete the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) trade deal, Canada offered 3.6 percent of its dairy market to the United States. It also promised to fully compensate farmers for any losses they might incur.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 05 - Argentina's 2018-19 wheat crop seen at record high - exchange

Argentina's 2018-19 wheat crop is expected to be a record-high 19.7 million tonnes, with heavy rains in the last week improving conditions, the Buenos Aires Grains exchange said on Thursday. Argentina's wheat harvest is expected to be 8.8 percent larger than last season due to favorable weather conditions and an expanded planting area of 6.2 million hectares, the exchange said in its weekly report. It added that 53.6 percent of the wheat planting area had adequate to optimal moisture conditions. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 4 - Russia has no immediate plans to suspend grain loading points in Krasnodar - RIA

Russia's agriculture safety watchdog has no immediate plans to suspend the operation of grain loading points in Black Sea ports near the city of Krasnodar, a regional office of the watchdog was quoted as saying by RIA news agency on Wednesday. Chicago wheat prices rose on Wednesday after the watchdog said on Tuesday it could temporarily suspend operations of 30 inland grain loading points in two of Russia's top grain exporting regions - Krasnodar and Rostov.  Click here to read full stories

Oct 4 - India raises winter crop prices ahead of 2019 elections

India raised state-mandated prices for winter crops such as wheat and rapeseed on Wednesday, as Prime Minister Narendra Modi tries to defuse discontent among farmers ahead of elections in 2019. The government announces minimum support prices (MSPs) for most crops yearly to set a benchmark, although state agencies usually buy limited quantities of staples such as rice and wheat at those prices due to a lack of storage and funds. Market prices for many crops typically run well below MSPs. Click here to read full stories

Oct 4 - Storms drench Australia's parched interior, but won't break drought

The heaviest rain in years has fallen across parts of drought-parched inland Australia, bringing relief to struggling farmers but likely not enough water to break a big dry that has crippled the country's most productive farmland. "I just got home when the rain hit the house," said Greg Lawrence on the phone from 9 Mile Station, a sheep run just north of Broken Hill, a town 940 km (580 miles) west of Sydney. Click here to read full stories

Oct 4 - Deepening farm crisis in India could hurt Modi's re-election bid

The financial squeeze on India's farmers is set to worsen because of record high fuel prices and surging costs of fertilisers, posing a challenge to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in an election that must be held by May. The rise in input prices could not have come at worse time for farmers, already grappling with falling domestic product prices due to rising yields and abundant harvests. Click here to read full stories

Oct 4 - Brazil antitrust watchdog approves Louis Dreyfus, Amaggi JV

Brazil's antitrust regulator Cade has given the green light to a joint venture between French commodities trader Louis Dreyfus Company and Brazilian soy processor and exporter Amaggi, the country's federal register showed on Wednesday. According to Cade, the tie-up will create a digital platform to offer integrated solutions for road freight for shippers and transporters. Click here to read full stories

Oct 4 - Watchdog sues Russian meat firm Cherkizovo over safety violations

Russia's agricultural watchdog said on Wednesday it had filed a lawsuit against meat firm Cherkizovo over safety violations. Rosselkhoznadzor, the watchdog, said it had asked the court to halt sales of products made by one of Cherkizovo's poultry units, citing the detection of Salmonella and listeria bacteria. Click here to read full stories

Oct 2 - U.S. lawmakers, at impasse on new Farm Bill, mull extension of old one

U.S. lawmakers are considering a short-term extension of the Farm Bill as talks over a new bill stalled, two Republican senators said on Tuesday, a move that would leave a critical heartland issue in limbo ahead of November congressional elections. The bill provides funding for an array of key programs, including crop subsidies and rural development. The latest one, passed in 2014, expired formally on Sept. 30 after talks over its replacement broke down. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Canada PM takes Quebec dairy gamble to preserve big trade deal

With his political future at stake, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will mount a charm offensive to placate dairy farmers who say he sold them out in order to win approval of a continental trade deal. Compounding Trudeau's challenges in the influential province of Quebec, where many dairy farmers are based, voters there tossed out one of his allies on Monday in favor of a new center-right party that opposes immigration and supports supply management, as Canada's dairy protection system is known. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Driest ever September deepens Australia's drought

Australia had its driest September on record last month, and though spring rains are forecast this week across parts of the continent's east that has seen the worst drought in years, the season is predicted to offer little relief from the dry weather. The country's east coast has recorded less than a fifth of its typical rainfall over the last three months to September and is barren, with winter crops failed and graziers buying in grain to feed their herds. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Russian watchdog may suspend work at some local grain loading points

Russia's agriculture safety watchdog said it may temporarily suspend operations of 30 in land grain loading points in two of Russia's top grain exporting regions - Krasnodar and Rostov. The watchdog, Rosselkhoznadzor, has been adding pressure on traders in recent weeks to pay more attention to the quality of grain in their supplies after complaints from major buyers about falling crop standards.  Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Trump plans Iowa visit next week to announce pro-ethanol measure - sources

President Donald Trump is expected to visit Iowa next week to deliver on a promise to lift a summer ban on higher ethanol blends of gasoline, according to two sources familiar with the plan, aimed at helping Farm Belt Republicans in tight congressional election races. The move would cap months of fractious negotiations initiated by the White House over ways to help the oil industry deal with the cost of complying with the nation's biofuel laws, without angering farmers in the nation's heartland.

Oct 2 - Russian wheat push for access to Algerian grain tenders 

Russian wheat exporters want to register with the Algerian authorities by the end of the year to start a process aimed at securing access to a market now dominated by France, the Russian authorities said on Monday. Russian wheat has been barred from international tenders in Algeria, one of the world's biggest wheat importers, for failing to meet the North African nation's strict bug damage controls. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Virus hurts hopes of fatter returns for Russian pork producers 

Russia's pork industry is being hampered by African Swine Fever (ASF) as outbreaks of the virus are preventing producers from exporting more to lucrative Asian markets and leaving them with falling prices at home, industry experts say. Russia first reported ASF in 2007 and has registered more than 1,300 cases since then as the highly contagious hemorrhagic disease of pigs has spread from the southern Caucasus region to the country's northwest region and Siberia in the east. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Will U.S.-China trade war end up worthwhile for U.S. soybeans? - Braun 

China’s absence from the U.S. soybean market has put tremendous pressure on both soybean growers and Chicago-traded soybean futures over the last several months. But the United States’ new trade pact with Mexico and Canada may offer some hope for a similar outcome with major U.S. trade partner China. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - EU rapeseed area to fall 8 pct on drought, unattractive prices - analyst 

The area sown with rapeseed for the 2019 harvest in the European Union is expected to fall by 8 percent from this year's level as farmers face drought conditions and less attractive prices compared with cereals, consultancy Strategie Grains said. In its first estimate of oilseed sowing trends for next year's harvest, the firm's analysts forecast the rapeseed area would decline to 6.32 million hectares from 6.86 million hectares in 2018. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Brazil 2018-19 soybean crop seen surpassing 120 mln tonnes - poll

Brazil's 2018-19 soybean crop is seen reaching 120.4 million tonnes, a record, according to the average view from 10 analysts and consultants in a Reuters poll. In a previous poll in August, analysts had on average seen the crop at 119.76 million tonnes. They see the total soy planted area growing 2.8 percent in the new season to 36.14 million hectares (see table below). Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Cash, cuts and confusion; Trade deal spurs Canadian dairy fears 

Canada's dairy concessions to the United States helped secure a hard-won trade deal, but they spurred talk on Monday of compensation, confusion and curtailed milk production, as a protectionist system faces new threats. U.S. and Canadian negotiators on Sunday reached a tentative trade deal, following an earlier deal between the United States and Mexico, that preserves a trilateral pact between the three North American countries, newly named the United-States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). Click here to read full stories.

Oct 2 - Crop Watch: Wet, cool weather slows activity in all eight states - Braun 

Harvest activity and crop progress were slow for the Crop Watch corn and soybean fields last week as wet and/or cool weather plagued all eight producers in some way or another. That theme is likely to continue in many areas as the forecast for the next two weeks is much wetter than normal across the U.S. Midwest. Click here to read full stories.

 

Oct 1 - U.S. soybean, corn supplies bigger than expected ahead of harvest 

U.S. corn and soybean supplies were bigger than expected despite record usage during the summer, the U.S. government said on Friday. Weak prices for corn and soybeans, stemming from concerns about exports, stoked domestic demand from crushers and processors eager to run their plants as much as possible amid strong profit margins. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - Funds cover CBOT corn shorts but get stung by heavy stocks - Braun 

Speculators had begun last week to reverse their heavily bearish attitudes toward Chicago-traded corn and soybean futures, but in an all-too-familiar fashion, U.S. government numbers took the wind out of the sails once again. The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Friday published its quarterly stocks report, which reflects U.S. corn, soybean and wheat supply as of Sept. 1. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - China to lift restrictions where 2nd African swine fever outbreak found 

China is set to lift restrictions on an area in central Henan province, where the country's second African swine fever outbreak occurred last month, the agriculture ministry said on Sunday. The local government in Zhengzhou plans to officially lift the blockade on Oct. 1, but it must take measures to prevent recurrence of the highly contagious disease, the ministry said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - Saudi Arabia plans to allow private sector to import feed barley - SPA 

Saudi Arabia, the world's largest importer of feed barley, will restore a private sector role in the trade after two years during which it was handled solely by the state, Minister of Environment, Water and Agriculture Abdel Rahman Al-Fadli was quoted as saying on Sunday. Saudi Arabia used to import its feed barley through the private sector but since 2016 the responsibility for imports has been held by the state grain buyer, the Saudi Grains Organisation (SAGO). Click here to read full stories

Oct 1 - Palm oil prices seen trading at 2,200-2,600 ringgit/T in H1 2019 - analyst Mielke 

Crude palm oil prices are seen trading between 2,200 ringgit ($532) and 2,600 ringgit a tonne in the first half of 2019 as demand for the tropical oil grows from the biodiesel industry, leading analyst Thomas Mielke said on Friday. He added that there was limited downside potential at current price levels, and that palm would bottom out at about 2,100 ringgit. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - Brazil to export 5 mil T soybeans to China in January - analyst Mistry 

Brazil is expected to export 5 million tonnes of soybeans to China in January, said a leading edible oils analyst, as a trade spat has China shifting its purchases from the United States to South America. Brazil's exports of soybeans in January are expected to come from Parana, its second-largest producing state, because its easy port access will enable quicker shipment to China, said Dorab Mistry on the sidelines of the Globoil India conference. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - NZ regulator halts Tegel's purchase of land for huge chicken farm 

New Zealand's overseas investment regulator on Monday turned down an application by Tegel Group Holdings Ltd to buy land on which it planned to build a huge chicken farm in the country's north. Tegel, in the process of being acquired by the local unit of Philippines poultry supplier Bounty Fresh Food Inc, wants to construct a farm capable of raising 9 million chickens a year for meat in the town of Dargaville. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - Fonterra's NZ milk production up 5 pct in August on favourable weather 

Milk producer Fonterra said on Monday its New Zealand milk production rose 5 percent in August from a year earlier due to ideal weather conditions. The company's Australian milk production dipped 4 percent in July on higher farm input costs and drought across parts of the country, Fonterra said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Oct 1 - India's rapeseed output could jump 17 pct - Emami Agrotech CEO 

India's rapeseed mustard production in 2018/19 could jump nearly 17 percent from a year ago to 7 million tonnes as higher prices are likely to prompt farmers to expand areas under planting, a leading Indian edible oil importer said. "Mustard crop can grow to 7 million tonnes," said Sudhakar Desai, chief executive officer of Emami Agrotech, up from 6 million tonnes in the same period a year earlier. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - Damaged soy crop hits farmers reeling from U.S.-China trade war 

A rain-damaged soybean harvest in the U.S. Mississippi Delta is heaping more pain on farmers already suffering from a damaging trade war between the United States and China that has dragged prices to lows not seen in a decade. Late-season storms, including bands of showers from Hurricane Florence, soaked ripe soybeans from Memphis, Tennessee, to northern Louisiana over the past two weeks, enhancing mold and fungus growth and causing some beans to rot in their pods, grain traders said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - IGC raises forecasts for 2018/19 world corn, wheat crops 

The International Grains Council on Thursday raised its forecast for world corn (maize) production in the 2018/19 season by 10 million tonnes to 1.074 billion tonnes, driven by improved crop outlooks in the United States, the European Union and Ukraine. The inter-governmental body, in a monthly update, raised its forecast for the U.S. corn crop to 376.6 million tonnes, up from a previous forecast of 370.5 million and now above the prior season's 371.0 million. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - Trade war could pull soybean futures below $8/bushel - analyst Mielke 

Chicago soybean futures could fall below $8 a bushel for the first time in a decade as the escalating Sino-U.S. trade war prompts China to cut purchases from the United States, a leading commodity analyst, Thomas Mielke, said on Thursday. "If the China trade war persists, we should see prices in Chicago falling below $8 a bushel, unless we get weather problems in South America," Mielke, editor of Germany-based newsletter Oil World, told the Globoil India conference. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - Beef demand, oilseed crush margins boost Cargill 1st-qtr profit

Grains trader Cargill Inc reported a nearly 5 percent rise in quarterly profit on Thursday as global demand for beef and improved oilseed crushing results offset challenges in several business units. But Cargill also faced various headwinds across the company - particularly in its protein and food ingredients units, both of which have been strategic growth areas. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - White House mulls limits on biofuel trading as part of E15 deal - sources 

The White House is considering imposing restrictions on trading of biofuel credits, hoping to discourage speculation and reduce costs for oil refiners to comply with U.S. biofuels policy, according to three sources familiar with the discussions. The sources, who asked not to be named because they are not authorized to comment on the discussions, said an announcement could be made in coming weeks. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - EU won't impose immediate tariffs on cheap Argentine biodiesel 

The European Commission has decided not to impose provisional import tariffs on a flood of low-priced Argentine biodiesel until it gathers more information, although it considers the fuel to be subsidised and a potential threat to local producers. The decision, detailed in a document seen by Reuters, comes as a major blow for European producers of fuels made from vegetable and recycled oil.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - Indonesia biodiesel output could jump 40 pct in 2019 - official 

Indonesia's biodiesel production could rise to 7 million tonnes in 2019, up 40 percent from an estimated 5 million tonnes this year, due to a new programme to boost local biodiesel consumption, said an Indonesian ministry official on Thursday. The world's largest palm oil producer launched an initiative in September that requires all diesel fuel to contain at least 20 percent bio content as part of efforts to cut Indonesia's fuel import bill, support the rupiah and increase palm oil consumption.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - Taiwan signs deal to buy $1.56 billion in Iowa, Minnesota soybeans 

Taiwanese trade officials and business leaders signed a letter of intent on Thursday to purchase as much as 3.9 million metric tons of soybeans from farmers in Minnesota and Iowa over the next two years, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton said in a statement. The Taiwanese Agricultural Trade Goodwill delegation said it plans to purchase between 3.2 million and 3.9 million tonnes valued at up to $1.56 billion of Midwestern soybeans in 2018 and 2019, state officials said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - Drought leads to drop in French rapeseed area - producers 

Parched conditions in France will prevent farmers from completing rapeseed sowing and lead to a sharp drop in the area planted for next year's harvest, oilseed producers group Terres Univia said on Thursday. The dry weather is expected to cause the rapeseed area for the 2019 crop to decline by 150,000-250,000 hectares from around 1.5 million hectares this year, it said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 28 - K+S flags 80 mln eur hit on Q3 profit due to drought 

German potash miner K+S said on Friday that limits to waste water discharge into the river Werra near its main German fertiliser production site caused a hit of about 80 million euros ($93 million) on third-quarter earnings after a summer drought lowered river water levels. As a result of the hit to earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA), the group's previous full-year guidance for 660 to 740 million euros in EBITDA will be revised on Nov. 15, when full third-quarter results are due for publication, K+S said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - India's soymeal exports to jump on Chinese demand, weak rupee - trade body 

India's soymeal exports in 2018/19 could jump as much as 70 percent from a year ago, buoyed by expected purchases from the world's biggest soybean buyer China, industry officials told Reuters on Thursday. A depreciation in the rupee and a jump in soybean output will help India gain market share in China, which is looking for new suppliers after imposing tariffs on key U.S. farm commodities as part of a Sino-U.S. trade row, they said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Crop chop: China shuns U.S. soybeans amid trade war, turns to Brazil 

China's soybean processors are snapping up record volumes of Brazilian cargoes for shipment in the fourth quarter, curbing purchases of U.S. crops in North America's peak marketing season as the trade war between Washington and Beijing intensifies. That shift away from U.S. beans by China, which takes more than 60 percent of the commodity traded worldwide, will pile further pressure on benchmark Chicago Board of Trade prices after they plumbed 10-year lows last week. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - What to look for in USDA's grain stocks data on Friday - Braun 

Market participants could see some unexpectedly friendly corn and soybean numbers from the government later this week, but any excitement could be very short-lived if traders are too distracted by the large, ongoing U.S. harvests and heavy supply ideas for soybeans in the coming year. The U.S. Department of Agriculture will publish estimates of Sept. 1 grain and oilseed inventory on Friday at noon EDT (1600 GMT). Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Argentina soybean exports to grow 15.4 mln tonnes on Chinese demand 

Argentina's soybean exports will grow 15.4 million tonnes in the 2018-19 harvest season, the Buenos Aires Grains Exchange said on Wednesday, citing strong demand in China driven by its ongoing trade dispute with the United States. That was four times more than last season, when a severe drought sapped Argentina's grain export sector, cutting profits and contributing to Argentina's current economic woes. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Louis Dreyfus CEO points to stronger results, rejects crisis talk 

Agricultural commodity giant Louis Dreyfus has seen improved results this year and has no plans to be absorbed in a merger, its chief executive said on Wednesday, rejecting talk of a crisis after the surprise exits of its former CEO and finance chief. Ian McIntosh was speaking a day after Louis Dreyfus Company announced his appointment following the resignation of CEO Gonzalo Ramirez Martiarena and CFO Armand Lumens. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Buyers battle at Australian wool auction as drought cuts supplies 

Auctioneer Ian Sharp has been selling Australian agricultural products to the highest bidder since 1968, and he's never seen demand like this before. Earlier this year, the benchmark price for fine Australian merino wool gained a foothold above the once mythic A$20/kg (about $6.60/lb) price, as one of Australia's worst-ever droughts leaves farmers struggling to keep flocks fed. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Indian cabinet approves incentives for 2018/19 sugar exports - govt statement 

India's cabinet on Wednesday approved incentives to encourage cash-strapped mills to export sugar in the 2018/19 season, a government statement said on Wednesday, part of efforts to trim bulging domestic stockpiles. Prime Minister Narendra Modi's cabinet will give transport subsidies of 1,000 rupees ($13.77) a tonne to 3,000 rupees a tonne to sugar mills, depending on their distance from ports, the statement said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Crude palm oil prices seen at $590/T CIF Rotterdam by year end - analyst McGill 

Crude palm oil prices are forecast to trend at $590 per tonne including cost, freight and insurance (CIF Rotterdam) by the end of the year on the back of firm demand from the biodiesel sector, industry analyst Julian McGill said on Thursday. "The crude palm oil price, despite pressure from soybean oil, is being supported by free market biodiesel demand," said McGill, head of Southeast Asia at commodities consultancy LMC International. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - India opens door to Brazilian pork as swine fever sweeps China 

India approved imports of Brazilian pork, Brazil's government said on Wednesday, relieving pressure on the market amid the rapid spread of African swine fever in neighboring China. Brazil's Agriculture Ministry said the Indian government had officially confirmed the decision a day earlier. Brazilian animal meat processing association ABPA celebrated the access to a market of 1.3 billion people. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - Sierentz opens palm oil trading desks in Singapore, Sao Paulo 

Sierentz Global Merchants, a commodities trading firm controlled by members of the Louis-Dreyfus family, has opened palm oil trading desks in Singapore and Sao Paulo, expanding its reach beyond its initial focus on European and Black Sea grains. Sierentz, which is separate from global trader Louis Dreyfus Company (LDC), has hired at least two people in each office, focusing on the palm and lauric oil markets, according to their LinkedIn profiles. LDC is majority owned by other family members. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 27 - South Africa's 2018 maize output seen 23 percent lower from 2017 at 12.9 mln tonnes - CEC 

South Africa is expected to harvest 12.9 million tonnes of maize in 2018, the government's Crop Estimates Committee (CEC) said on Wednesday, largely in line with market expectations. The CEC's final forecast was 0.78 percent lower than a Reuters poll of four analysts which pegged the harvest at 13.002 million tonnes. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - China to start buying more Argentine soybeans – Oil World 

China is starting to buy more Argentine soybeans because of China’s trade war with the United States, and Argentina will in turn purchase more U.S. soybeans to meet its own needs, oilseeds analysts Oil World said on Tuesday. Soybean exports from the United States to China have come to a virtual stop since July when Beijing imposed heavy tariffs on U.S. imports as part of a trade war between the two countries.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Louis Dreyfus CEO, finance chief quit in latest shake-up 

Louis Dreyfus Company announced the surprise departures of its chief executive and head of finance on Tuesday, triggering another reshuffle at the commodities giant as it strives to recover from weak agricultural markets. The group said in a statement that Gonzalo Ramirez Martiarena had resigned as CEO after three years in the post to pursue other opportunities, and would be replaced with immediate effect by Ian McIntosh, previously chief strategy officer. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Rains improve conditions for winter grain sowing in Russia, Ukraine 

Recent rains across Ukraine and Russia have improved conditions for 2018's winter grain sowing and the prospects for the next year's harvest, weather forecasters said on Tuesday. Russia and Ukraine, major global wheat exporters via the Black Sea, were previously sowing winter grains for the 2019 crop amid dry weather and a risk to next year's crop after a decline in the 2018 crop.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Brazil to import 1 mln tonnes of soy from U.S., says trader 

Brazil, the world's No 1 soy exporter, is expected to import around 1 million tonnes of the oilseed in coming months from its largest global competitor, the United States, as local supplies dwindle, according to Sao Paulo-based grain trader Agribrasil. It would be the first time that the South American nation, an agricultural powerhouse, needs to import large volumes of soybeans from the United States - a result of massive exports by Brazilian soy producers to China in recent months after the Asian nation slapped a 25 percent import tariff on U.S. beans. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Germany to become net grain importer after drought - USDA 

Germany, in most years one of the EU’s largest grain exporters, is expected to become a net importer after a hot, dry summer damaged crops, said a report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN). "The drought has heavily affected grain, rapeseed and forage production in Germany," said the report. "As a result, Germany is expected to strongly increase imports of soybeans/soybean meal and to become a net grain importer." Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Argentina national strike protests inflation, shuts grains port 

Shops across Argentina were shuttered and the streets in the capital, Buenos Aires, were quiet on Tuesday after the country's largest union called a 24-hour strike to protest President Mauricio Macri's handling of the economy, which has been racked by runaway inflation. Argentina's main agricultural port of Rosario was closed by the strike, as were public transport services and private freight shippers, unions said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Australia's Nufarm swings to loss as drought cuts herbicide sales 

Australian crop protection company Nufarm Ltd reported an annual loss on Wednesday as a severe drought cut domestic sales, prompting it to slow down production, write down its business and launch a capital raising. Nufarm's woes augur badly for other firms exposed to Australia's rural sector, which is struggling through the driest conditions in decades across the country's east. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - Indonesian activists abseil down palm refinery tanks in deforestation protest 

Environmentalists abseiled down storage tanks and unfurled banners at a palm oil refinery in Indonesia on Tuesday in protest at deforestation of the country's tropical forests. They draped banners saying "drop dirty palm oil now", while other activists clung to the anchor of a cargo ship near the facility operated by a unit of Singapore's Wilmar International, the world's biggest palm oil trader. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 26 - East, West Africa lead continent's fertilizer uptake push

Africa’s annual fertilizer consumption is expected to reach 13.6 million metric tonnes of nutrient by 2030 from 7.6 mmt now, with East and West Africa fast growth areas as farmers look to boost crop yields, industry analysts CRU said on Tuesday. The world’s poorest continent, which has vast tracts of uncultivated land and where most of the population are subsistence farmers, has traditionally lagged behind other regions when it comes to fertilizer use. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - U.S. confirms lead as EU's main soybean supplier 

The United States confirmed its status as the main supplier of soybeans to the European Union this week, having supplied 52.4 percent of the 2.9 million tonnes of soybeans imported into the bloc so far in 2018/19, official data showed on Monday. The EU had imported 1.54 million tonnes of U.S. soybeans since the start of the season on July 1 up to Sept. 23, while the second-largest supplier Brazil shipped 1.17 million, giving it a market share of 39.7 percent, data published by the European Commission showed. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - South African phosphate miner plans London IPO by year-end - CEO 

South African phosphate miner, Kropz, is on track to list on London's AIM Stock Exchange by the end of the year as it prepares for first production from its main asset in 2019, its chief executive said on Tuesday. Kropz wants to raise cash to pay down debt and further develop its Elandsfontein phosphate mine, which is expected to begin production in the second half of next year, before reaching 900,000 tonnes per annum in 2020. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - India's monsoon rainfall drops further, endangering summer crops 

India's monsoon has produced 9 percent less rain than usual, raising concerns over production of the country's summer-sown crops as rainfall in many key grains producing states has been nearly a quarter lower than normal levels. Summer crop production is being closely watched by markets as lower output could spoil Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's efforts to raise the income of farmers, who make up more than half of its 1.3 billion people, in an election year. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - Russian wheat prices ended week higher on stronger rouble 

Russian wheat export prices rose further at the end of last week on a stronger rouble, which is trading at more than six-week highs against the dollar, and tougher control of quality, analysts said on Monday.Russia's food safety watchdog beefed up quality controls on grain exports after complaints from major buyers about falling crop standards in mid-September.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - China says new African swine fever outbreak reported in Inner Mongolia 

China said on Monday it has confirmed a new outbreak of African swine fever in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of northern China, as authorities struggle to contain the highly contagious disease. The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said a slaughterhouse in the city of Hohhot reported the outbreak, adding that four pigs were infected with, and two had died from, African swine fever. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - Crop Watch: Corn, soy harvest presses on amid unwelcome rain - Braun 

Three more Crop Watch 2018 fields were harvested last week: the Iowa and Illinois soybeans and the Kansas corn. Final yield scores ranged from 1 (Kansas) to 5 (Iowa). Fields due for harvest this week include corn in Iowa and Illinois and soybeans in Nebraska and Ohio. An active weather pattern has recently brought heavier rain amounts to the Upper Midwest and Northern Plains, slowing field activity.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - Philippines ramps up rice imports to stem high retail prices 

The Philippines on Monday decided to ramp up its rice imports before year-end, announcing a decision to purchase an additional 500,000 tonnes apart from the 250,000 tonnes it planned to buy via an open tender. The Southeast Asian county, one of the world's biggest rice buyers, also planned to buy 1 million tonnes of rice next year, Agriculture Secretary Emmanuel Pinol said, as the government moves aggressively to curb rising retail prices of the grain. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 25 - Morocco’s OCP and China’s Hubei Forbon team up to develop fertilisers 

The world’s largest phosphate exporter, Morocco’s Office Cherifien des Phosphate (OCP) said on Monday it has signed an agreement with China’s fertiliser additives supplier Hubei Forbon to develop a new generation of eco-friendly fertilisers. Under the partnership, the two companies will work together to develop a new generation of high added-value fertilizers such as biostimulants, sulfur fertilizers, fertilizers with micronutrients and water-soluble fertilizers, the OCP said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 24 - Chinese Cash Market Prices for Grains, Oilseeds, Sugar, Porks, Cotton etc ... are / will be Unavailable.
Chinese Data are unavailable due to holiday's :
    24 sep  lundi        Mid-Autumn Festival
    1 oct    lundi         National Day
    2 oct    mardi        National Day Golden Week holiday
    3 oct    mercredi    National Day Golden Week holiday
    4 oct    jeudi         National Day Golden Week holiday    
    5 oct    vendredi    National Day Golden Week holiday    
    6 oct    samedi      National Day Golden Week holiday
    7 oct    dimanche   National Day Golden Week holiday

Sep 24 - For bold Chinese buyers of soybeans, bargain U.S. prices trump trade war

At least two cargoes of U.S. soybeans are heading for China as some buyers are willing to risk taking up historically cheap U.S. beans even amid worries that Beijing may take further steps to deter imports amid mounting trade tensions with Washington. Grain traffic from the United States to China has nearly ground to a halt since Beijing hit $50 billion in U.S. imports, including soybeans, with hefty tariffs, in retaliation for a similar move by Washington.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 24 - China's August grain imports slide on Sino-U.S. trade war

China's grain imports fell sharply in August, customs data showed on Sunday, a month after Beijing imposed hefty tariffs on shipments from the United States, one of its top suppliers. China brought in 60,000 tonnes of sorghum in August, down 78.5 percent from 259,892 tonnes a year ago, according to figures published by the General Administration of Customs. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 24 - Funds trash CBOT corn, wheat, but stand pat in soy -Braun

World grain stocks may be tightening, but investors were turned off toward Chicago-traded futures and options last week amid high expectations for the ongoing U.S. corn and soybean harvests and uncertainty over trade with top bean buyer China. Money managers were very heavy sellers in corn through Sept. 18 but hardly changed their stance in soybeans, somewhat against predictions. They dumped bullish bets in Chicago wheat and reached an all-time short position in soybean oil. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 24 - Swiss voters reject more aid for farmers

Swiss voters decisively rejected more help for farmers in two referendums on Sunday, heeding the government's warnings that the measures would send food prices rocketing and hurt the economy, projections for broadcaster SRF showed. Opinion polls had shown early widespread support for more farm aid was fading as the vote neared and more details about likely costs emerged. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 24 - Argentina bets on $600 mln satellite to boost agriculture sector

Argentina is launching a new microwave imaging satellite to monitor natural disasters and soil moisture, in a long-term bid to bolster the farm sector, an industry that has historically been the backbone of the country's economy. Scheduled to launch on a SpaceX Falcon rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Oct. 6, Argentina's SAOCOM 1a satellite "is going to boost the high quality precision agriculture Argentina relies on," President Mauricio Macri told farmers and industry representatives last week. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 24 - Ukraine grain exports at 8.8 mln tonnes so far

Around 8.8 million tonnes of grain have been exported or prepared for future export so far this season, down from around 9.7 million tonnes at the same point last season, the state service for food safety said on Friday. So far in the 2018/19 season, which runs from July to June, Ukraine has exported 5.2 million tonnes of wheat, 2 million tonnes of barley and 1.4 million tonnes of maize, it said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 21 - Australia signs one of the 1st new-crop wheat export deals-traders

Australian suppliers have signed one of the country's first new-crop wheat export deals with a sale of 50,000 tonnes to Thailand, two trade sources said. Australian Premium White (APW) wheat was sold to flour millers in Thailand at around $280 a tonne, including cost and freight (C&F), for arrival in December-January, they said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 21 - As U.S.-China trade row grows, India urges China to drop meal import ban – sources

India has urged China to drop a years-long ban on rapeseed meal imports from the South Asian nation at a meeting with government officials and feedmakers as it aims to boost sales of critical farm goods amid growing U.S.-China trade tensions. The meeting was held at India's embassy in Beijing on Wednesday, according to an Indian government official and a soymeal purchasing manager at a pig farmer who attended and spoke to Reuters on the sidelines of an industry conference here on Thursday. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 21 - WTO members clamour for more clarity on US farm spending

Trading partners will demand more details from the United States at the World Trade Organization next week about its planned $12 billion aid package for U.S. farmers hurt by the Trump administration’s tariff wars. The U.S. aid package, announced in July, is intended to shield U.S. farmers from the repercussions of trade disputes between the United States and China, the European Union and others. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 21 - Indonesia aims to coax, not compel, exporters to convert dollar revenue – finmin

Indonesia's finance minister said the government aims to "persuade" exporters to keep earnings onshore and convert them into rupiah, rather than make this mandatory, amid confusion over a plan floated this week to support the ailing currency. On Tuesday, Trade Minister Enggartiasto Lukita had said authorities would make it mandatory for exporters of commodities such as palm oil, coal, oil and natural gas to keep half of their proceeds onshore for at least six months and convert them to rupiah. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 21 - Malaysia keeps Oct crude palm oil export tax at zero pct

Malaysia maintained its export tax on crude palm oil for October at zero percent, according to a circular on the Malaysian Palm Oil Board's website on Friday, citing the national customs department. The export tax was zero percent in September as well. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 20 - U.S. soy seizes EU market, bolstering Trump trade deal

The United States has supplanted Brazil as the European Union's top supplier of soybeans since a deal in July with President Donald Trump to avert a trade war, according to EU data seen by Reuters on Thursday. In the 12 weeks to mid-September, U.S. soybeans accounted for 52 percent of imports to the EU, rising 133 percent compared with the same period last year to 1.47 million tonnes. The United States had just 25 percent of the market in the same period of 2017. Click here to read full stories

Sep 20 - U.S. growers faced with securing buyers, storage for big crops - Braun

The United States has once again produced record-yielding corn and soybean crops, but as the harvest begins, the challenge to find storage for unsold bushels may be greater than ever amid already burgeoning supply. Raising more bushels is generally ideal for farmers to offset production costs, especially in a low-price environment. However, harvest volumes in the top growing states are expected to soar, adding to the importance of equally healthy demand. Click here to read full stories

Sep 20 - Banks, traders launch first commodities blockchain platform

Global banks and trading firms are launching the first blockchain-based platform for financing the trading of commodities from oil to wheat, they said in a joint statement on Wednesday. The platform will be run by a venture called komgo SA, based in Geneva, Switzerland, and is due to go live later this year. Click here to read full stories

Sep 20 - China's sow herd falls in August by 4.8 pct from a year earlier

China's sow herd fell in August by 4.8 percent from a year earlier, the country's State Council said on its website on Wednesday citing data from the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, the biggest drop this year. The numbers reflect this year's poor pig prices as well as some impact from the recent outbreaks of African swine fever, said Yao Guiling, an analyst at China-America Commodity Data Analytics. Click here to read full stories

Sep 20 - Brazil's BRF sees rising competition for corn from ethanol makers

Brazil's largest poultry processor BRF SA has seen rising competition for corn supplies in the country's center-west region coming from plants producing corn-based ethanol, Chief Executive Pedro Parente said on Wednesday. The executive said the new situation posed a challenge for the company regarding securing raw material for feed at reasonable cost. Corn-based ethanol is a relatively new trend in Brazil, but has been developing quickly in center-west states such as Mato Grosso due to the ample supplies of the cereal. Click here to read full stories

Sep 20 - Cargill recalls about 132,000 lbs of beef products over possible contamination

Cargill Meat Solutions is recalling about 132,000 pounds of ground beef products that may have been contaminated with E.Coli, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Wednesday. Cargill's ground beef had been identified in an August investigation into an E.Coli outbreak which had resulted in 17 illnesses and one death, the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) said in a statement. Click here to read full stories

Sep 19 - Inside China's strategy in the soybean trade war

The executive from one of China's biggest soybean crushers sat on a panel at a Kansas City agricultural exports conference, listening to an expert beside him explain why China would remain dependent on U.S. soybeans to feed its massive hog herds. When his turn to speak came, Mu Yan Kui told the international audience of soy traders that everything they just heard was wrong. Then Mu ticked off a six-part strategy to slash Chinese consumption and tap alternate supplies with little financial pain. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 19 - Hog deaths, manure flooding from Florence seen surpassing 2016 hurricane

North Carolina estimated on Tuesday that 3.4 million poultry birds and 5,500 hogs died in Hurricane Florence, exceeding the number killed in the state's last major hurricane two years ago. The North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services projected the animal death toll after emergency workers and veterinarians spent days in the field assessing losses at farms following the storm. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 19 - Bayer's Monsanto asks U.S. court to toss $289 mln glyphosate verdict

Bayer AG unit Monsanto on Tuesday asked a California judge to throw out a $289 million jury verdict awarded to a man who alleged the company's glyphosate-based weed-killers, including Roundup, gave him cancer. The company said in motions filed in San Francisco's Superior Court of California that the jury's decision was insufficiently supported by the evidence presented at trial by school groundskeeper Dewayne Johnson. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 19 - Bayer says agriculture trade flows may change amid tariffs dispute

Bayer said on Tuesday it would be difficult to predict 2019 earnings at its agriculture business, which now includes Monsanto, because a U.S.-Chinese trade dispute could reroute global trade flows in farming commodities. The head of Bayer's crop science division told Reuters his company could even benefit if U.S. farmers switched to grow more corn to avoid barriers to the soy trade imposed by China in response to U.S. tariffs on Chinese products. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 19 - Informa Economics sees more U.S. corn acres in 2019, less soy

Private analytics firm Informa Economics projected that U.S. corn plantings would rise 4.4 percent in 2019 to 93.044 million acres, while soybean acres would decline 7.5 percent, according to an Informa client note seen by Reuters. Informa forecast a U.S. 2019 corn crop of 15.256 billion bushels based on a yield of 178.0 bushels per acre (bpa). Click here to read full stories.

Sep 19 - Global dairy prices fall for third time in a row, despite signs of robust demand

Global dairy prices fell at the third fortnightly auction in a row early Wednesday as New Zealand's supply of key products ramped up. The GDT Price Index dipped 1.3 percent to an average selling price of $2,934 per tonne, after falling 0.7 percent at the previous sale. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - Millions of chickens drown in Florence floodwaters, manure pits damaged

U.S. food companies kept slaughter plants shut on Monday in southeastern states swamped by Hurricane Florence as catastrophic flooding killed nearly 2 million chickens, collapsed the walls of at least two hog manure pits, and made stretches of major roads impassable. Florence, which has dumped up to 36 inches (91 cm) of rain on North Carolina since Thursday, was interrupting supply lines around the state and into neighboring South Carolina. Meteorologists have warned that the worst is yet to come as rivers rise.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - Drought to trim Australia's golden fleece

Australia on Tuesday trimmed its forecast for wool production by 6 percent as drought across the country's east coast forces farmers to cull sheep despite record prices for their fleece. In its latest update, Australia's chief commodity forecaster outlined the cost of a prolonged drought across the east coast, weather that casts a shadow over many of the Australia's largest agricultural companies and the wider economy. Click here to read full stories.

 

Sep 18 - NOPA August soy crush 158.885 million bu, below trade expectations

U.S. processors crushed 158.885 million bushels of soybeans in August, a figure that fell below a range of trade expectations but nonetheless represented the largest August total on record, the National Oilseed Processors Association (NOPA) said on Monday. The August figure was down from the 167.733 million bushels crushed in July. Analysts had been expecting a crush of 163.870 million bushels, based on the average of estimates given by eight analysts in a Reuters survey. Analysts' estimates ranged from 160.0 million bushels to 167.5 million bushels. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - Crop Watch: Indiana corn tops expectations, Iowa and Kansas on deck - Braun

The Indiana corn last Thursday became the first of the Crop Watch 2018 fields to be harvested, and the results were outstanding. The Kansas and Iowa corn fields should be harvested this week along with the Iowa and Illinois soybeans. The Indiana and Ohio soybeans are about a week away from being cut and the Illinois corn will be ready next week. The combines will likely come to the rest of the fields between Sept. 30 and Oct. 20. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - China's pig fever outbreak a boon for chicken farmers

An outbreak of African swine fever in China is proving to be a windfall for chicken farmers, helping drive up prices of the country's second-most popular meat to two-and-a-half year highs. With pork in short supply as authorities try to contain the highly contagious disease, shoppers are turning to chicken as a substitute, with some diners also concerned about safety. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - Tyson Foods CEO steps down for personal reasons

Tyson Foods Inc Chief Executive Officer Tom Hayes will step down at the end of the month for personal reasons after less than two years in the role, the top U.S. meat processor said on Monday. Noel White, a company veteran who has been running Tyson's chicken, beef and pork businesses, will replace Hayes. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - Macquarie to buy Australian farms of Qatar's Hassad Food

Australia's Macquarie Group Ltd said it has agreed to buy most of the Australian farm portfolio of Qatar's Hassad Food, the agricultural arm of the country's sovereign wealth fund. Neither Macquarie nor Qatar's state-run news agency gave a price for the deal. The Australian Financial Review reported it was worth about A$300 million ($215 million). Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - EU crop monitor trims maize, sugar beet yields again after drought

The effects of a summer drought have continued to weigh on crops in the European Union despite less severe conditions in the past month, the EU's crop monitoring service said on Monday, as it trimmed its outlook for 2018 maize and sugar beet yields. Persistent dryness, which has hurt crops and parched grasslands across northern Europe, also poses a risk for the rapeseed that has just been sown for next year's harvest, the MARS service said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 18 - Cuban agriculture faces another hard year as produce sales drop

Cuba moved nearly 15 percent less produce through domestic markets during the first six months of the year, compared with the same period in 2017, signaling another bad year for its agricultural sector, according to a government report. The market sales in the report, issued over the weekend, account for 10 percent to 15 percent of agricultural output, according to a local expert, who requested anonymity due to restrictions on talking with journalists. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 17 - Malaysian Cash Market Prices for Palm Oil Unavailable
Data for Malaysian cash market prices for palm oil are unavailable due to a Malaysia Day holiday. Market will resume on Tuesday, September 18th.

Sep 17 - Australia's biggest wheat region hit by frost; hurts export prospects

Widespread frost has dented hopes that wheat growing areas in Australia's west could provide a much needed boost to output, analysts and traders said on Monday, further tightening supplies amid a prolonged drought. Australia, the world's fourth largest wheat exporter, expects production of its largest rural commodity to hit a 10-year low this season at 19.1 million tonnes, as drought across the country's east wilts output.  Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - Traders wary of delays as Russia toughens grain export control

Russia's food safety watchdog has beefed up quality controls on grain exports due to complaints from major buyers and the lower quality of the crop, it said on Friday, adding that the more stringent checks were not aimed at limiting grain exports. Traders have been watching for any changes to regulations because they were used in the past to place informal curbs on exports. Some traders said the new controls were excessive and could cause delivery disruptions on signed contracts. Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - Philippine paddy rice losses from typhoon exceed forecasts

The Philippines lost a total of 250,730 tonnes of paddy rice due to the strong typhoon that hit its northern provinces over the weekend, according to initial official estimates, exceeding a worst-case forecast by 60 percent. The Philippines, one of the world's biggest rice importers, had been under pressure to boost its stocks of the grain even before Typhoon Mangkhut struck, with soaring retail prices helping to push inflation to its highest in nearly a decade. Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - China says battling swine fever is "complex and challenging"

Battling the spread of African swine fever in China is "very complex and challenging", the country's agriculture ministry said after chairing a meeting of over a dozen major government bodies. The meeting on Thursday came as more than a dozen African swine fever outbreaks have been reported across China since early August, mostly on small farms. Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - NOPA August U.S. soy crush seen at 163.870 mln bushels - survey

U.S. soybean plants continued their recent strong crushing pace in August to capitalize on robust profit margins for processing the oilseed into meal and oil, analysts said ahead of a monthly National Oilseed Processors Association (NOPA) report. NOPA members, who handle about 95 percent of all soybeans processed in the United States, likely crushed 163.870 million bushels of soybeans last month, according to an average of estimates given by eight analysts in a Reuters survey. That compares with a crush of 142.424 million bushels in the same month a year earlier, the largest-ever crush for the month of August. Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - Florence seen testing N. Carolina environmental codes on toxic hog waste

Tropical Storm Florence could taint North Carolina waterways with murky coal ash and toxic hog waste as heavy rains test environmental rules written with milder weather in mind, carrying the risk of contaminating water with bacteria like salmonella, officials said on Friday. Many of the state's environmental codes were written to withstand a 25- or 100-year storm. But Florence promises heavy rains that some regions might not see in a thousand years, straining systems meant to keep state residents safe. Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - EU farmers start maize harvest after torrid summer

Harvesting of grain maize is getting off to an early start in the European Union and analysts expect severe summer heat and drought to have hurt yields in countries like France and Germany, and contribute to record import demand. Analyst firm Strategie Grains on Thursday cut its monthly forecast for the EU's grain maize (corn) harvest by nearly 5 percent, citing the effects of the torrid summer in France, Germany, Poland and central Europe. Click here to read full stories

Sep 17 - Cargill to pay total of $1.5 mln to Muslim workers in Colorado prayer dispute 

Cargill Meat Solutions will pay a total of $1.5 million to 138 Muslim workers who were fired after walking off the job in a dispute over prayer breaks at a Colorado meat-packing plant in 2015, the company said on Friday. The dispute arose after the workers, mostly Somali immigrants, were dismissed after they staged a three-day walkout over what they said were insufficient prayer breaks at a plant in Fort Morgan, about 75 miles northeast of Denver. Click here to read full stories

Sep 14 - Asia eyes Argentine wheat as drought curbs Australian output

Asian flour millers are expected to seek rare wheat shipments from Argentina in coming months as a second year of drought in traditional supplier Australia curbs supplies. At present, Asian wheat importers, including the world's biggest buyer Indonesia, are buying most of their wheat from the Black Sea region. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - Sonny's roadshow: How Trump's Ag chief sells a trade war to farmers

Breaking off from a tour of dairy operations on a farm in upstate New York, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue tramps across a muddy path to take a sample of sweet corn from an adjacent field. With a wide smile, he shucks the ear and takes a bite, then passes it around to others in the crowd before getting back to his mission: selling farmers on the merits of President Donald Trump's trade war. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - Brazil forward grains sales rise as dollar firms vs real

Brazilian farmers are selling more of next year's soy and corn harvest since the U.S. dollar strengthened past 4 reais in August, driving up the value received by producers pricing the crop in the local currency, according to analysts. Sales of the 2018-19 crop had previously been slow as farmers, concerned over the country's move to set minimum truck freight rates raising transportation costs, held off on signing forward sales contracts. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - Trump says Democrats stalling farm bill, work requirement a must

U.S. President Donald Trump accused Democratic lawmakers on Thursday of stalling major farm legislation and said the work requirements in the bill were imperative. "Senator Debbie Stabenow and the Democrats are totally against approving the Farm Bill. They are fighting tooth and nail to not allow our Great Farmers to get what they so richly deserve. Work requirements are imperative and the Dems are a NO. Not good!" Trump wrote on Twitter. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - Second round of tariff-related aid to farmers may come in December - USDA

A second round of tariff-related aid to U.S. farmers could be announced in December, according to a white paper released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Thursday. The government model used to account for growers' losses may factor in new tariff levels enacted against trade partners, such as China or the European Union, according to the paper. It does not state how much money could be directed to farmers, or how such funds would be split up. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - Strategie Grains cuts EU maize outlook after hot summer

Consultancy Strategie Grains cut its outlook for grain maize production in the European Union by nearly 5 percent as crop conditions continued to deteriorate over the summer due to hot and dry weather in France and central Europe. In a report published on Thursday, the French-based firm estimated this year's grain maize crop in the 28-member bloc at 58.4 million tonnes, down from 61.3 million pegged last month and 59.3 million harvested last year. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - ‘Buyer beware' on Canadian cheese concessions, say European exporters

A trade deal meant to give European cheesemakers more access to the Canadian market is falling short of its promise in its first full year, government data show, frustrating the European industry, which blames a year-old Ottawa quota system. Under the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with the European Union, Canada agreed to more than double tariff-free imports of cheese over five years, starting in September 2017. The new imports will eventually represent about 4 percent of the Canadian cheese market. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - Dryness after summer heatwave seen cutting EU rapeseed sowings

Dry soil after record-breaking European summer heatwaves means farmers have been unable to plant all the rapeseed they wished, experts said on Thursday. The ground may have been too dry for sowings in parts of the top four producers Germany, France, Britain and Poland. High grain prices after the poor European Union crop this summer also made some farmers turn to cereals from rapeseed, Europe’s main oilseed for edible oil and biodiesel production. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 14 - France calls for measures after African swine fever found in Belgium

France called on Thursday for protective measures following reports that African swine fever had been detected in wild boars in Belgium near the French border. The disease, highly viral for pigs but not dangerous for humans, has been spreading in the European Union, mainly in the eastern part of the bloc where it has led to the culling of hundred thousands of animals. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 13 - USDA raises U.S. corn, soy harvest view on record yields

The U.S. Agriculture Department on Wednesday issued a surprise increase to its corn harvest forecast due to expectations of record yields in key production areas such as Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska and Indiana. Soybean yields were seen at an all-time high, with the production outlook raised above its already record-high forecast. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - INTL FCStone pegs Australian wheat production below official forecasts

Commodity brokerage INTL FCStone on Thursday pegged Australian wheat production below recently reduced official estimates, as a crippling drought in the country's east shows no signs of easing. The brokerage forecast Australian wheat output for the year to end-September 2019 at 18.78 million tonnes, below Australia's latest official estimate of 19.1 million tonnes. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - Argentina soy harvest expected to reach 50 mln tonnes in 2018-19

Argentina's soy harvest is expected to reach 50 million tonnes during the 2018-19 season, while estimates for corn production fell to 43 million tonnes, down from around 45 million tonnes previously, the Rosario grains exchange said on Wednesday. An exchange spokesperson said predictions for wheat production during the 2018-19 season remained at 21 million tonnes, but would be updated in October. Farmers had planted 6.32 million hectares with wheat this year, up from 5.7 million hectares the prior season. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - Soybean market reacts generously to bearish USDA data -Braun

Chicago-traded soybean futures were able to combat ballooning supply numbers from the U.S. government on Wednesday, but the U.S. harvest may simply be too big, even despite some renewed demand hopes. The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Wednesday pegged U.S. soybean yield for the 2018 harvest at 52.8 bushels per acre, higher than both the trade guess and last month’s 51.6 bpa. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - Commodities giant ADM ramps up ethanol sales in Chicago, irking rivals

Archer Daniels Midland Co has sold unusually high volumes of ethanol into the Chicago market since late last year as export markets dried up, driving down prices in the U.S. Midwest and angering the company's rivals, according to traders and regulatory data. The Illinois-based global commodities powerhouse, a major ethanol producer, accounted for roughly 61 percent of the 9.5 million barrels sold at the Chicago hub between November and August, according to the data reviewed by Reuters. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - France seen raising wheat exports after avoiding worst of weather

France, the European Union's biggest grain producer, could boost exports of wheat and barley this season after its harvest was less affected by severe weather than other EU states, the country's farm office said on Wednesday. In its first supply-and-demand outlook for the 2018/19 July-June season, FranceAgriMer projected French soft wheat exports outside the EU at 8.5 million tonnes, up from 8.1 million in 2017/18, while barley exports to non-EU destinations were forecast to rise to 3 million tonnes from 2.5 million. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - Dry weather poses risk to Russia's 2019 grain crop - analysts

Dry weather in some Russian regions is posing a risk to next year's grain crop in one of the world's largest wheat exporters, analysts and an industry lobby group said. Russian farmers are sowing winter grains for the next year's crop while the country is gathering this year's harvest. Officials expect the harvest to fall to 105 million tonnes in 2018 from a record 135 million tonnes in 2017. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - Brazil prosecutors seek leniency talks with BRF in food fraud probe

Brazilian federal prosecutors probing whether chicken processor BRF SA and certain laboratories colluded to cheat on food safety tests are seeking cooperation from the firms in return for more lenient penalties, a federal prosecutor told Reuters in an interview. Prosecutors had found "grave irregularities" and would demand that the companies carry out a root-and-branch restructure as part of any leniency deal, federal prosecutor Lyana Helena Joppert Kalluf said last week. Click here to read full stories

Sep 13 - Ukraine cheers investments from IKEA, Saudi Arabia's SALIC

Ukrainian investment announcements by Swedish furniture retailer IKEA and the Saudi Agricultural and Livestock Investment Company (SALIC) are votes of confidence in the country's business climate, President Petro Poroshenko said on Wednesday. Ukraine is battling to shake off an image of entrenched corruption that has long deterred foreign investors and held up the disbursement of billions of dollars worth of aid from the International Monetary Fund. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - China's small farmers pose huge challenge in swine fever battle

Even after 14 outbreaks of African swine fever across China in just over a month, pig farmer Wang Wu does not believe the threat to his livelihood is real. "I heard about the African swine fever thing. But then people said it was just rumour. It was fake news," said Wang, who raises about 60 pigs in a village near Harbin, capital of China's northeastern Heilongjiang province. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - China slashes 2018/19 soybean import forecast as U.S. trade war crimps buying 

China on Wednesday slashed its forecast for 2018/19 soybean imports as farmer reduce their use of the bean in animal feed because of the Sino-U.S. trade conflict, leading the government to raise its supply deficit estimate. Imports of soybeans in the crop year that starts on Oct. 1 will be 83.65 million tonnes, down 10.2 million tonnes from last month's estimate of 93.85 million tonnes, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said in its monthly crop report. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - U.S. farmers scramble to harvest crops as hurricane looms

As powerful Hurricane Florence crept closer to the southeastern United States on Tuesday, farmers in North Carolina rushed to harvest corn and tobacco and stock up on pig rations, while the danger of deadly flooding threatened a state where millions of farm animals are housed. The forecasts for devastating rain and winds also had WH Group's Smithfield Foods, the largest U.S. pork processor, planning to shut two of its North Carolina plants - including the world's biggest hog slaughterhouse.  Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - Canada ready to allow U.S. dairy access in NAFTA talks - sources

Canada is ready to offer the United States limited access to the Canadian dairy market as a concession in negotiations to rework the North American Free Trade Agreement, two Canadian sources with direct knowledge of Ottawa's negotiating strategy said on Tuesday. U.S. President Donald Trump said at the White House that trade talks with Canada were going well and that Ottawa wants to make a deal. Chrystia Freeland, Canada's foreign minister, returned to Washington on Tuesday for talks with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - Britain outlines post-Brexit farm policy in bill

Britain will introduce legislation on Wednesday for agricultural policy after it leaves the European Union that will link support for farmers to the provision of public benefits such as tackling climate change or preserving beautiful landscapes. The Agriculture Bill, primarily covering England, will provide the basis for policy in a sector which for decades has been controlled by the European Union. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - Brazil raises soy export projection, end-stocks lowest on record

Brazil's government on Tuesday raised by 2 million tonnes its projection for soybean exports in the 2017/18 crop to 76 million tonnes amid strong Chinese demand, reducing the crop's end-stocks to the lowest on record. Agricultural statistics agency Conab raised by 300,000 tonnes its projection for the country's 2017/18 soybean crop from August to 119.3 million tonnes, the second-highest output ever, but even with that increase soy end-stocks fell to 434,000 tonnes from 638,000 tonnes last month. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - Smithfield Foods to shut world's largest hog plant before Florence hits

Smithfield Foods, a unit of China's WH Group, will shut down the world's largest hog slaughter plant in Tar Heel, North Carolina, on Thursday and Friday due to Hurricane Florence, a company spokeswoman said on Tuesday. The powerful storm was expected to hit North Carolina on Friday. The Tar Heel facility can slaughter 35,000 hogs per day and has 4,400 employees, Smithfield spokeswoman Diana Souder said in an email. Click here to read full stories

Sep 12 - Malaysia's end-Aug palm oil stocks hit 7-month top - MPOB

Palm oil end-stocks in Malaysia rose to a seven-month high in August, above market expectations, as output levels increased and exports fell, according to official data on Wednesday. Inventories in the world's second largest palm producer rose to 2.49 million tonnes, up 12.4 percent from the previous month, Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB) data showed. The level was the highest since January, while the monthly increase was the biggest since November. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - Australia cuts wheat forecast by nearly 13 percent as drought wilts rural economy

Australia lowered its wheat forecast by nearly 13 percent on Tuesday as a crippling drought across the country's east coast has cut output from the world's fourth-largest exporter to a 10-year low. Wheat production during the 2018/19 season will total 19.1 million tonnes, the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) said. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - Meat tracking key to fight African swine fever - OIE

Tracking meat and meat products from pigs infected with African swine fever is key to fight the spread of the highly viral disease as it can survive in processed food, the Deputy head of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Monday. African swine fever (ASF) has spread rapidly in eastern Europe and China, the world's largest pork producer, where new cases are appearing every day and the disease is travelling vast distances.  Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - China detects new African swine fever case in Anhui province

China on Monday reported another outbreak of the deadly African swine fever in the eastern province of Anhui as the highly contagious disease spreads further in cities that have already reported infections. China's Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said in a statement on its website that 23 hogs have died and 63 were infected in the new case in Tongling city in Anhui. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - Brazil farmers vie for soy contract during U.S.-China trade war

Brazilian farmers said they are seeking support to develop a soybean futures contract that would ease deals between Brazil, the world's largest soy exporter, and top importer China at a time of heightened U.S.-China trade tensions. A growing chorus of growers, analysts, bankers and even a U.S. Department of Agriculture economist said it would make sense to establish such a contract to hedge growing risks as Brazil and U.S. soybean prices diverge. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - U.S. crop ratings seen declining; corn harvest under way - poll

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is likely to project a slight decline in U.S. corn and soybean condition ratings following rains that soaked maturing crops in the Midwest last week, according to a Reuters poll on Monday. The USDA in a weekly report due at 3 p.m. CDT (2000 GMT) is likely to rate 66 percent of the U.S. corn crop and 65 percent of the soybean crop in good to excellent condition, each down 1 percentage point from a week earlier, according to an average of estimates by 11 analysts. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - Russian deputy PM sees 2018/19 grain exports at 30 mln T

Russia is expected to harvest 105 million tonnes of grain, leaving 30 million tonnes available for export in the 2018/19 marketing season that started on July 1, its deputy prime minister in charge of agriculture said on Monday. The country's 2018 grain crop is forecast to decline from a record 135 million tonnes in 2017. It will still be a large crop compared with the average of the past five years but the activity of the main exporters for the 2018/19 season is being monitored closely by the agriculture ministry. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - Crop Watch: Corn harvest to begin this week with Indiana, Kansas - Braun

The first Crop Watch 2018 corn fields should be harvested this week in Kansas and Indiana without too much delay. Last week’s plentiful rains left over from Tropical Storm Gordon did not cause as many problems as initially feared. The corn harvest should continue with Illinois late next week and Iowa in the last week of the month. Ohio should follow around Oct. 1, and Minnesota is likely to close things out around Oct. 20. Click here to read full stories

Sep 11 - British beef would be "uncompetitive overnight" after no-deal Brexit - food officials

Some British food, including beef and lamb, would become "uncompetitive overnight" on foreign markets in the event of a no-deal Brexit, food industry representatives told lawmakers on Monday. Crashing out of the EU without an agreement would leave producers with customs arrangements set by the World Trade Organization - where agricultural tariffs could top 50 percent, Sarah Baker, from the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board, said. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - China's August soy imports jump as buying from Brazil continues

China imported 9.15 million tonnes of soybeans in August, up 14 percent from July, customs data showed on Saturday, as buyers in the world's top importer continued to buy from Brazil after Beijing imposed tariffs on U.S. shipments. August figures were up from last year's 8.44 million tonnes. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - U.S. agriculture chief says NAFTA deal must end Canada's milk protein scheme

Canada must end its low-price milk proteins policy to reach a U.S.-Canadian deal to update the North American Free Trade Agreement, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said. Canada has encouraged overproduction and flooded export markets for milk proteins used in cheese and yogurt, hurting U.S. dairy farmers, Perdue said in an interview aired on Sunday on C-SPAN television. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - Amid trade row, China to allow soybean imports from Ethiopia

China will start allowing soybean imports from Ethiopia, customs authorities said on Friday, as the world's top importer seeks to reduce its reliance on supplies of the oilseed from the United States amid a trade row with Washington. The move would diversify soybean imports origins for China, and help meet domestic demand, the General Administration of Customs said in a statement on its website. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - Funds sour on CBOT grains, soy against trade consensus - Braun

Speculators were pegged last week by trade sources as net buyers of Chicago-traded corn, soybeans and wheat, but their corn views did not budge, and they were instead net sellers of soy and wheat. Despite a drop in exportable wheat supply worldwide, U.S. exporters have yet to cash in on the deal and total sales for the current marketing year sit at a nine-year low. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - "No progress" on financing of Russia-Iran wheat deal - Iran industry group

Plans for a deal under which Russia and Khazakstan are to supply wheat to Iran have stalled as "no progress" has been made in its financing, the secretary general of the Iran Federation of Food Industry Associations said. Talks on the deal began six months ago. It would see Russia and Kazakhstan supplying wheat to Iranian flour millers, who in turn would supply flour to Iraq -- a market dominated by Turkey.  Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - Japan finds first swine fever case in 26 years, but not African fever

Japan's agriculture ministry said on Sunday it had confirmed the country's first outbreak of swine fever in 26 years and suspended exports of pork and wild boar meat. The fever, a different kind from the African swine fever that has broken out in China, was found in a farm in central Japan's Gifu city, the ministry said. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - Australia's drought could produce a corker vintage

If Australia's big dry has a silver lining, it'll be worth cellaring, according to vintners, who are scrambling to irrigate vines while preparing for a smaller but sweeter vintage. Spring, when vine buds burst into fruit and flower, has come with much of Australia's east gripped by a drought that has turned usually fertile pastures barren.  Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - India summer crop sowing edges up; rice area expands 2.3 pct y/y

Indian farmers have planted summer-sown crops on 104.17 million hectares as of Sept. 7, up 0.2 percent from a year earlier, government data showed. Cotton sowing was down 2.4 percent, while rice planting rose 2.3 percent. Click here to read full stories

Sep 10 - African swine fever in China almost certain to spread in Asia - FAO

The African swine fever spreading rapidly in China is "here to stay", the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization said on Friday, adding that it was almost certain to spread to other Asian countries. The fever was first detected in China in early August and has been found in 18 farms or abattoirs in six provinces, with many cases more than a 1,000 kms (621 miles) apart, the FAO said in a statement. Click here to read full stories

Sep 07 - Palm Oil Drops Ahead of Malaysian Holiday  

Palm-oil prices continue to feel profit-taking ahead of a 4-day holiday weekend in Malaysia and export estimates for the start of this month. Shipments improved at the end of August. Bursa Malaysia benchmark futures are down 0.6% at MYR2,264/ton.

Sep 07 - New Zealand Lamb Prices Continue to Rise (ASB Bank DJ)
New Zealand lamb prices have continued to run higher, climbing some 4% more to around NZ$8.40/kilogram. It indicates "generally healthy global economic growth," says ASB Bank. It adds while the outlook for lamb prices is healthy, risks are growing amid the prospect of "a full-blown US-China trade war." New Zealand is the world's largest lamb exporter.

Sep 07 - Drought to Push Down Australian Cattle Numbers (USDA)
The USDA sees Australian cattle numbers being 25.3 million in Jan. 1, versus 25.5 million a year earlier, in the wake of the widespread drought in country's 2 major cattle-producing states. That should result in exports dropping 7% to 1.51 million metric tons for all of 2019 from this year's estimated level. Australia is one of the world's largest beef exporters, so less from it should help prices globally.

Sep 07 - China's vast pig market in lockdown as African swine fever spreads

For pig trader Fang, the discovery of the deadly African swine fever in China last month has brought his once booming business to a sudden halt. From northeast Liaoning province, Fang used to truck up to 600 pigs a day as far away as Guangdong, some 2,700 km (1,680 miles) to the south. But an outbreak of the highly contagious disease means transport of pigs out of Liaoning has been banned. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 07 - Australia's top wheat exporting state set for near-record crop in wake of rains

Western Australia, the country's biggest wheat exporting state, is poised for near-record harvests of the crop this year after rains in the region in August, even as the eastern grain belt grapples with its second year of punishing drought. Wheat yields in the state, a key supplier to the world's biggest importer Indonesia, are expected to be better than average in most areas, analysts and traders said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 07 - Informa raises U.S. 2018 corn, soy yield forecasts - trade

Private analytics firm Informa Economics revised its forecast for the U.S. 2018 corn yield upward to 178.8 bushels per acre (bpa) from 176.0 bpa previously, and raised its U.S. soybean yield forecast to 52.9 bpa from 50.0 bpa, trade sources said on Thursday. Informa projected U.S. 2018 corn production at 14.621 billion bushels and soybean production at 4.698 billion bushels, the sources said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 07 - Brazil minimum freight rates hurt port cargos - association chief

Brazil's policy of setting minimum freight rates is reducing the volume of cargo at Brazilian ports as farmers and agricultural exporters have difficulty arranging transportation at higher cost, according to the head of a Brazilian ports association. The country instituted minimum rates for freight above the previous market rate as part of a deal to end a truckers' strike over high diesel prices in May.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 07 - Louis Dreyfus opens new oilseed plant in China's Tianjin

Global grains trader Louis Dreyfus Company (LDC) opened its new oilseed processing facility in the northern city of Tianjin as part of its expansion in the world's top consumer of soybeans, the company said. The plant, purchased from Singapore-based Golden Agri-Resources last year, has a daily crushing capacity of 4,000 tonnes and oil refining capacity of 1,200 tonnes. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Cargill hedge fund CarVal says rejected approach by Schroders

British asset manager Schroders expressed interest in buying CarVal Investors in May but the hedge fund is owned by U.S. agri group Cargill said it was not for sale, a CarVal executive said. CarVal, with $11.6 billion under management placing it in the top 2 percent of global hedge funds, would have been a major acquisition for Schroders as it expands its product range. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - U.S. corn, soy shippers post banner summer as trade concerns loom - Braun

The United States has been the best source for thrifty corn and soybean buyers in recent months, and the low prices-ample supply combination allowed U.S. exporters to continue their string of record months in July. Going forward, the outlook is bright for corn shippers as U.S. supply is the cheapest and most plentiful.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Brazil hikes freight rates 5 pct, lifting agriculture costs

Brazil's transportation regulator on Wednesday raised minimum truck freight rates by 5 percent on average, as the government walks a tight line between the demands of the agriculture and trucking industries following a truckers' strike in May. Exporters group Anec criticized the higher rates for raising costs for the country's grain sector by 3.4 billion reais ($818 million), while truckers association Abcam said the adjustment did not go far enough. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Egypt's GASC buys 60,000 T of Russian wheat

Egypt's state grains buyer, the General Authority for Supply Commodities (GASC), said on Wednesday it had bought 60,000 tonnes of Russian wheat in an international purchase tender. GASC is seeking the wheat for shipment over Oct. 21-30, it said without providing further details. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Australia's GrainCorp hikes FY18 earnings outlook on strong grain trading

GrainCorp Ltd Australia's biggest listed bulk grain handler, on Thursday raised its full year underlying net profit and underlying core earnings outlook, helped by a strong performance from its international grain trading book and global malt business. The firm said in a statement it now expects underlying net profit of A$60 million to A$75 million ($43 million to $54 million) for the year to end-September 2018, above the A$50 million to A$70 million range it re-confirmed in May. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - China finds African swine fever in Anhui farm; 10th outbreak in a month

China has detected an outbreak of African swine fever on a farm in Anhui province, its tenth case since the first outbreak of the deadly virus was discovered just over a month ago, state broadcaster China Central Television said on Thursday. The report said 22 hogs have died and 62 were infected on the farm in Fengyang county in the city of Chuzhou, which has 886 pigs. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - U.S. wheat export group to close Russian office

U.S. Wheat Associates (USW), a trade group that promotes U.S. exports, is closing its office in Moscow after 26 years, it said in a statement, reflecting the emergence of Russia as a major wheat exporter. Russian wheat production has soared in the past few years. As a result, the country became the world's largest wheat exporter in the 2017/18 marketing season, which ended on June 30, increasing supplies to markets traditionally dominated by the United States. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Protesters block Iraqi commodities port

Protesters blocked the entrance to Iraq's Umm Qasr commodities port on Wednesday to demand better services, port employees and local government officials said, raising the stakes in some of the worst unrest in southern cities in months. The move came hours after stone-throwing protesters set fire to the main provincial government building in the oil hub of Basra, Iraq's second largest city. The highway from Basra to Baghdad was cut off by demonstrators. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Trump says Congress should pass farm bill with food stamp work requirements

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday the final agriculture bill that the U.S. Congress sends to him to sign into law should include work requirements for people receiving food stamps, the grocery subsidies officially called "SNAP." "#FarmBill with SNAP work requirements will bolster farmers and get America back to work. Pass the Farm Bill with SNAP work requirements!" Trump tweeted, as the two chambers of Congress begin reconciling separate bills that they recently passed into a single piece of legislation for him to sign. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - Saudi Arabia sets Nov. 30 qualification deadline for flour mills sale

Saudi Arabia's state grain buyer SAGO has set a Nov. 30 deadline for qualification applications from investors interested in the sale of its flour mills, it said on Wednesday. The sale, among the kingdom's first privatisations and a litmus test for other state asset sales to follow, began its so-called qualifying phase on Aug. 26.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 06 - K+S to cut further costs this year as drought hampers production

German minerals miner K+S plans further cost savings this year to achieve its profit guidance as it grapples with a severe drought that has hampered production at its main German mine. K+S shut down production at its Wintershall site at the end of August as exceptionally low water levels in the Werra river have restricted its ability to dispose of waste water. The site remains offline. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 05 - UN holds emergency meeting in Asia as China battles African swine fever

The United Nations is holding an emergency meeting this week with animal health experts in Asia to discuss the threat of African swine fever after the first outbreak of the disease in the region was discovered in China last month. China has detected eight cases of the highly contagious virus since discovering the first outbreak on Aug. 3, raising concerns about its spread in the world's largest pork producer and beyond its borders into Southeast Asia.  Click here to read full stories.

Sep 05 - China soybean imports from U.S. to plunge in 2018/19 - Jiusan exec

China will almost entirely replace its soybean imports from the United States with Brazilian beans and other origins in the upcoming season, but may run out of the oilseed in early 2019, said an executive with a top crusher on Tuesday. The forecast was one of the most bearish yet on the impact of the Sino-U.S. trade war for American farmers. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 05 - Crop Watch-Storm Gordon's deluge largely unhelpful for corn, soy yields - Braun

The U.S. Crop Watch corn and soybean fields are moving closer to the finish line, and in most cases reaching or expected to reach maturity a week or two earlier than normal. Yield expectations remain strong, but some states, including Kansas, Iowa, and Illinois, will be grappling this week with heavy late-season rainfall. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 05 - Brazil may become 2nd-largest cotton exporter in 2018/19 - trade group

Brazil could become the world's second-largest cotton exporter in the 2018/2019 crop cycle, jumping ahead one position to surpass India in the global rankings, Brazilian trade group Abrapa said on Tuesday during an industry event. Brazil is expected to export 1.12 million tonnes of cotton lint in the 2018/19 harvest, which would place it second to only the United States, Abrapa's executive director Márcio Portocarrero said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 05 - Egypt's GASC seeks wheat for Oct. 21-30 shipment

Egypt's General Authority for Supply Commodities (GASC) set a tender on Tuesday to buy an unspecified amount of wheat from global suppliers for shipment from Oct. 21-30. GASC Vice Chairman Ahmed Youssef said the authority was seeking to buy cargoes of soft and/or milling wheat from the United States, Canada, Australia, France, Germany, Poland, Argentina, Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary and Paraguay. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 05 - Weekend rains soak U.S. Corn Belt; Wisconsin soy yields threatened

Heavy rains soaked the western U.S. Midwest this weekend and more showers were expected as remnants of Tropical Storm Gordon move into the Corn Belt this week, slowing the advancing maturity of corn and soybean crops, meteorologists said. Storms brought 2 to 5 inches (5 to 13 cm) of rain this past weekend from Nebraska to Wisconsin and northern Illinois, with some local amounts reaching 8 inches (20 cm), World Weather Inc meteorologist Andy Karst said. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - Argentine farmers seen delaying wheat sales under new tax regime

Argentine farmers may delay wheat sales and plant less corn this year after the government announced a roughly 10 percent export tax on the grains on Monday as part of an austerity program designed to halt a run on the peso currency, growers and consultants said. The measures announced by President Mauricio Macri's government include a tax of four pesos per dollar on wheat and corn shipments. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - China reports new African swine fever case as virus spreads

China reported another outbreak of deadly African swine fever late on Monday, its third new case in two days, as the highly contagious disease spreads rapidly through the world's top pork producer. The latest case, the eighth since the virus was first reported in the country a month ago, was found in the city of Wuxi, the agriculture ministry said, two hours drive west of Shanghai in eastern China's Jiangsu province. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - Funds cling to bullish wheat stance, but wary of corn, soy - Braun 

Speculators are not yet ready to ditch the wildly bullish wheat story, though they remain cautiously bearish toward Chicago-traded corn and soybeans. In the week ended Aug. 28, hedge funds and other money managers cut their net long position in CBOT wheat futures and options to 51,180 contracts from 60,812 in the previous week, according to data from the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - Strategie Grains cuts EU rapeseed outlook for 7th consecutive month

Strategie Grains has lowered its forecast for the 2018 European Union rapeseed harvest for a seventh consecutive month mainly due to a downward revision in Germany. The France-based consultancy in its monthly oilseed report said it expected EU rapeseed production of 19.62 million tonnes, down from an estimate of 19.95 million a month ago and 11.5 percent smaller than the 2017 crop. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - China will not face soybean shortage in Q4 - China soybean assn

China will not face a shortage of soybeans in the fourth quarter, despite tariffs on imports of the oilseed from the United States related to the Sino-U.S. trade war, an official from the China Soybean Industry Association said on Tuesday. The U.S. typically supplies about a third of China's soybean imports but Beijing has levied steep tariffs on its beans, which has halted shipments to China. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - Russia meets grain traders, sees no need to limit exports

Russia's Agriculture Ministry does not see a need to impose an export duty on grains or to curb grain exports in any other way, it said in a statement after a meeting with exporters on Monday. Chicago wheat prices - a global benchmark for grains - were supported last week by speculation that Russia, one of the world's largest wheat exporters, might move to limit wheat exports later in the season due to a lower crop. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 04 - Brazil court overturns ban on weed-killer glyphosate

A Brazilian court on Monday overturned an injunction banning products containing the popular weed-killer glyphosate, knocking down a previous ruling that had been set to disrupt the soy planting season set to begin this month. A Brazilian judge ruled last month to halt the registration of new glyphosate-based products in the country and to suspend existing registrations after 30 days, until health agency Anvisa issues a pending ruling on its safety. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 03 - China bans pig shipments from regions hit by African swine fever as 6th case detected

China imposed a ban on Sunday on transporting pigs and pork products from provinces which have reported outbreaks of African swine fever and will shut live hog markets in the regions, as authorities found a sixth case of the highly contagious virus. The measures announced by the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs are the most drastic since the country discovered its first-ever case of the deadly virus a month ago, and come amid growing concerns about its spread through the world's largest hog herd. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 03 - Brazil prosecutors hope to strike deal lifting glyphosate injunction

Brazil federal prosecutors are negotiating with health authority Anvisa and the agriculture ministry to reach a deal that could lift an injunction against the popular weed-killer glyphosate, a prosecutor on the case told Reuters on Friday. Prosecutors have requested a meeting next week to discuss a deal just as a ban on glyphosate products already on the market is expected to go into effect on Monday, Brasilia-based prosecutor Luciana Loureira Oliveira said by telephone. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 03 - Argentina IMF deal could mean reversal of Macri's grain tax cuts

As Argentina drafts plans to cut its budget deficit to convince nervous investors it can pay its debts, President Mauricio Macri is under increasing pressure to reverse one of his signature policies, cutting farm export taxes. Treasury Minister Nicolas Dujovne promised to announce measures on Monday to reduce the South American country's 2019 primary deficit - its borrowing needs before debt servicing - in an effort to stem the slide in the peso, one of the world's worst performing currencies this year. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 03 - Canadian canola, wheat harvests smaller than expected after dry summer

Canadian farmers will harvest less canola and wheat than expected, and fall short of last year's production, a Statistics Canada report showed on Friday. Hot, dry weather across the Prairies was expected to curb yields, although patchy rains left crops in better shape in some areas. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 03 - Algeria's 2017 grain harvest rises by 74 pct - minister

Algeria's grain harvest has reached 6 million tonnes, a 74.4 percent rise from the last year's harvest, Agriculture Minister Abdelkader Bouazghi said on Saturday. This year's production was the highest since 2012 when the North African country harvested 6.9 million tonnes. The government had forecast expected production for 2018 to be better than last year's 3.5 million tonnes due to sufficient rainfall. Click here to read full stories.

Sep 03 - EU slashes 2018 wheat export estimate by 5.5 mln tonnes

The European Commission on Friday slashed its monthly forecast of common wheat exports from the European Union in the 2018/2019 season, due partly to a cut in its output estimate, in a further sign of tight world wheat supplies. In supply and demand forecasts released on Friday, the Commission pegged EU common wheat exports this season at 20.0 million tonnes, down from 25.5 million estimated in July and now below the 21.3 million shipped last season. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 31 - Malaysian Cash Market Prices for Palm Oil Unavailable
Data for a.m. and p.m. Malaysian cash market prices for palm oil are unavailable due to a holiday (Independance Day)

Aug 31 - Concerns over less milling wheat pose headache for Ukraine, Russia 

Ukraine and Russia may have less milling wheat than previously expected this year after rain during harvesting hurt the quality of crops, potentially accelerating any curbs on exports from the Black Sea exporters, traders and analysts said. Kiev and Moscow have said there is no need to impose restrictions on wheat exports for now, but their agriculture ministries are closely monitoring activity of the main exporters for the 2018/19 marketing season. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 31 - Strong U.S. soy sales mask the alarmingly thin Chinese interest - Braun 

The new U.S. soybean marketing year begins on Saturday, and although exporters have already booked a sizable volume of beans to be shipped during 2018-19, the absence of one buyer is glaring. Through Aug. 23, total U.S. soybean sales for 2018-19 were up 15 percent on the year. But total sales to top customer China stand at a 13-year low amid the ongoing trade war between the two countries, which two months ago led Beijing to slap a 25 percent tariff on U.S. beans. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 31 - China's Dalian Commodity Exchange to cut delivery months for soybean futures contract 

China's Dalian Commodity Exchange said on Thursday it will reduce the number of delivery dates for its soybean futures contract to six from nine and will shorten the forward curve to one year from 18 months. Currently investors in the No. 1 soybean contracts can trade futures spanning a range of delivery dates from September to as far out as January 2020. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 31 - U.S. wheat growers have Trump's ear on old Canada trade gripe 

Gordon Stoner, who grows wheat in Montana about a mile from the Canadian border, would like to sell his wheat to grain elevators in nearby Saskatchewan. But due to a quirk in Canadian law, the high-protein variety he raises would be automatically downgraded by government inspectors to the lowest possible category - fit for animals only - regardless of its quality. “When I cross the border, my wheat is automatically treated as feed wheat," said Stoner, referring to a Canadian grain classification. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 31 - China reports fifth case of African swine fever 

African swine fever has infected 185 pigs on a farm in eastern China's Anhui province, the country's fifth case of the deadly disease in less than a month amid growing concerns about the rapid spread of infection in the world's largest hog herd. The outbreak killed 80 of 459 hogs on a farm in Nanling county in Wuhu city, with the remaining 379 culled, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said on Thursday. The farm is 350 km (217 miles) directly west of Shanghai. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 31 - Russian fertiliser firms freeze domestic prices until end of winter sowing 

Russian fertiliser producers have agreed to freeze domestic prices for their crop nutrients until the end of winter grains sowing campaign, the agriculture ministry said in a statement on Thursday. Russian farmers are sowing winter grains for the next year's crop at a time when the rouble in one of the world's largest wheat exporters is close to its lowest since April 2016 against the dollar, meaning a potential growth in rouble prices for global commodity products. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 31 - NZ's Fonterra cuts 2018-19 forecast farmgate milk price 

New Zealand's Fonterra Co-operative Group Ltd cut its forecast farmgate milk price for 2018-19 on Friday by 3.6 percent due to increased global supply. The world's top dairy exporter trimmed the forecast farmgate price to NZ$6.75 per kilogram of milk solids (kgMS) from NZ$7 per kgMS set earlier. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 31 - Almost half of Argentina's 2018-19 wheat crop rated 'good to excellent' 

Conditions in 46 percent of Argentina's 6.1 million hectares (15.07 million acres) planted with wheat were rated as "good to excellent," thanks to a favorable growing climate during the first half of the 2018-19 season, the Buenos Aires Grains Exchange said on Thursday. Rains last week added to the favorable conditions, the exchange said. Farmers have finished planting for the 2018-19 season, and harvest begins in the final months of the year. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 31 - No limits: Philippines gears up to scrap caps on rice imports 

The Philippines is gearing up to scrap more than two-decade-old caps on rice imports in the face of raging inflation and the possible threat of trade sanctions over the policy, a revamp that could bring relief to consumers but pain to farmers. The move would also be a boon to the Philippines' main overseas suppliers of the grain, Vietnam and Thailand, with imports seen potentially doubling to 3 million tonnes a year, making the nation the world's No.2 buyer after China. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 31 - In the land of pilsner, Czech hops suffer amid drought 

Fans of sought-after Czech hops might be left a little thirsty this year as the prized hops are the latest victim of a summer drought, cutting yields by about 30 percent below average. Czech hop growers are likely to fare worse than the world's main producers, Germany and the United States, which account for about three-quarters of the global supply. Only a mild drop is expected in those countries in 2018. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 30 - Chinese soy buyers leave U.S. exporters show empty handed 

An annual U.S. soy exporters' conference wrapped up on Wednesday without any known sales to Chinese buyers, in sharp contrast to previous years where billions of dollars of the main U.S. cash crop have been signed over to China in elaborate ceremonies. The U.S.-China trade dispute has effectively halted bilateral trade of soybeans and U.S. farmers are concerned that soy export demand will fall short during their primary shipping season this autumn, when they expect to harvest a record-large crop. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 30 - As drought grips Australia's east, giant grains trains roll to the rescue 

Until a few months ago, train driver Gavin Slater had never seen anything like it. Five locomotives, with a combined 15,000 horsepower, ready to pull 101 wagons brimful of grain. The converted coal carriages behind Slater were being loaded in Mallala, a town of several hundred people in Australia's fertile southern wheat belt. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 30 - The silver lining behind sagging CBOT corn futures - Braun 

Chicago-traded corn futures are approaching an anniversary of sorts, which could provide temporary relief to anxious corn bulls if history repeats. Most-active CBOT corn futures have slid 8 percent since the end of last month as the expectation for another big U.S. crop has begun overshadowing robust demand and the drastic supply cut forecast by the government. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 30 - Wheat jumps as Russian grain traders prepare for AgMin meeting 

Russia's agriculture ministry will discuss the current grain market situation, production and export plans during its routine meeting with exporters on Sept. 3, the ministry told Reuters, as global benchmarks jumped. The Chicago December wheat contract rose on Wednesday on market talk of Russia potentially curbing grain exports in the future. Russia is one of the world's largest wheat exporters, but its crop is expected to decline this year from a record harvest in 2017. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 30 - EPA should revoke Monsanto weed killer approval, groups tell U.S. court 

Environmental groups argued in federal appeals court on Wednesday the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency failed to analyze the risks Bayer AG Monsanto's dicamba-based weed killer posed to nearby crops before approving it in 2016. The groups, which filed a lawsuit in February, want the court to force the EPA to vacate its approval of XtendiMax, arguing it not only harms nearby crops and plants but wildlife as well. It is not clear whether the court has the authority to revoke an EPA approval. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 30 - Australia's east coast drought to intensify as dry weather to linger for months 

Australia's east coast will experience dry weather for at least the next three months, the country's meteorological bureau said on Thursday, intensifying a drought that has wilted crops and left farmers struggling to stay in business. In its latest three-month outlook, the Bureau of Meteorology said there was only a 30 percent chance rainfall would exceed average levels over much of the country's east coast during spring, which runs from September to November. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 30 - Bunge, Santander offer loans to Brazil farmers preserving land 

Commodities trader Bunge Inc, bank Banco Santander Brasil and conservation group The Nature Conservancy are promoting a scheme to finance Brazilian farmers who commit to preserve virgin land, they said on Wednesday. The program expects to make available $50 million in loans starting in September that will be repaid in 10 years, they said in a news conference in São Paulo. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 30 - FranceAgriMer adjusts 2018 soft wheat harvest quality levels 

Farm agency FranceAgriMer on Wednesday estimated that 85 percent of this year's French soft wheat crop showed a protein content of 11.5 percent or above, confirming initial indications of good crop quality but the estimate was six percentage points lower than last week. The share of the crop above the 12 percent mark, a key level in international tenders, rose to 48 percent from 47 percent last week, FranceAgriMer said in an update to its annual wheat quality survey. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 29 - Corn prices fall most in feedgrain market as record U.S. crop looms

Corn prices have dropped the most this year among feedgrains including sorghum and barley, as U.S. farmers gear up to harvest their biggest crop in history. The most-active corn contract  on the Chicago Board of Trade has given up 8.5 percent this year, the market's sixth year of decline. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 29 - Appetite for destruction: Soy boom devours Brazil's tropical savanna

When farmer Julimar Pansera purchased land in Brazil's interior seven years ago, it was blanketed in tiers of fruit trees, twisted shrubs and the occasional palm standing tall in a thicket of undergrowth. He mowed down most of that vegetation, set it ablaze and started planting soybeans. Over the past decade, he and others in the region have deforested an area larger than South Korea. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 29 - Argentina 2018 beef exports to double on high Chinese demand

Argentina's beef exports could double in 2018 for a total of $1.8 billion thanks to increased Chinese demand and a sharp devaluation of the peso currency, according to analysts and industry experts. Analysts expect shipments to total a minimum of 400,000 tonne, the largest for Argentina's beef industry in the last nine years, indicating the sector is strengthening despite a financial crisis that has bedeviled President Mauricio Macri's government. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 29 - China says can't rule out new African swine fever outbreaks

China's agriculture ministry said on Wednesday it cannot rule out the possibility of new African swine fever outbreaks as concerns grow over the deadly disease's spread in the world's largest hog herd. The ministry said in a statement on its website that it was not clear how widely the disease had spread, and there was much uncertainty on how the situation will develop. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 29 - Argentina says exports soyoil to China for first time in 3 years

Argentina is exporting soyoil to China for the first time in three years, the agriculture ministry said in a statement on Tuesday. A 29,000-tonne shipment of soyoil was being loaded at the port of Timbues, near Argentina's Rosario grains hub, the statement said. Two more shipments of soyoil were also planned for China, it said, for a projected total 90,000 tonnes. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 29 - India's soybean output may rise 20 pct in 2018/2019 -industry official

India's soybean output is set to jump about 20 percent to over 10 million tonnes in the 2018/2019 crop year that starts in October, an industry official said on Wednesday. Higher production in the world's top importer of edible oils could curb its appetite for cargoes from overseas, potentially dragging on international soybean prices. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 29 - Canada's dry weather may stem US cattle stampede across border

Parched pastures and crops in Western Canada are driving up cattle-feeding costs, and farmers and analysts expect the changing economics to stem a recent stampede of U.S. cattle being brought over the border. Canada imported 65,035 head of cattle from the United States from January through June, nearly double the pace of a year earlier when imports of U.S. cattle were at their highest level in 16 years, according to Statistics Canada. Most were young cattle to be fattened on feedlots. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 29 - Brazil's Marfrig sets debt targets, shares fall

Marfrig Global Foods SA , Brazil's second largest meat-packing company,has introduced new debt metric targets in an amended shareholders agreement, according to a securities filing, as it completed asset sales to raise cash and cut debt. But investors were unimpressed by the financial discipline targets, and Marfrig shares fell almost 6 percent to 5.82 reais at midday on Tuesday. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 29 - S.Africa's 2018 maize output seen unchanged at 13.2 mln tonnes - CEC

South Africa is expected to harvest 13.2 million tonnes of maize in 2018, the government's Crop Estimates Committee (CEC) said on Tuesday, largely in line with market expectations. The CEC forecast was 0.7 percent higher than a Reuters poll of five analysts which pegged the harvest at 13.11 million tonnes.  Click here to read full stories.

Aug 29 - Russia's Steppe to boost grain exports, seek Egypt opportunity

Russian agriculture holding company Steppe plans to ramp up grain exports sharply this season, part of its bid to become one of top five traders of Russian grain by 2020, the company said in a statement on Tuesday. Steppe, part of Russian business conglomerate Sistema will also seek to join the supplier list of Egypt's state-run General Authority for Supply Commodities (GASC), a source familiar with Steppe's plans told Reuters. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 29 - Brazil Agriculture Minister Maggi expects appeals court decision on glyphosate Tuesday

Brazil Agriculture Minister Blairo Maggi said he expects an appeals court to make a decision as early as Tuesday regarding an injunction that suspended registration of glyphosate products in the country, he told reporters during an event in São Paulo on Tuesday. "We are waiting for a ruling, today a solution is likely," he said referring to an appeal pending on an Aug. 3 ruling that new products containing the widely used herbicide could not be registered in Brazil, and existing registrations would be suspended as of September, until health authority Anvisa issues a decision on its re-evaluation of glyphosate's safety. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 28 - U.S. government to pay $4.7 bln in tariff-related aid to farmers 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Monday its farm aid package would include $4.7 billion in direct payments to farmers to help offset losses from retaliatory tariffs on American exports this season. The bulk of the payments, $3.6 billion, would be made to soybean farmers. That amounts to $1.65 per bushel multiplied by 50 percent of expected production, Undersecretary for Farm Production and Conservation Bill Northey said on a conference call. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 28 - Russian wheat prices fall with global benchmark, rouble 

Russian wheat export prices fell last week with the global benchmark in Chicago and because of a weaker rouble, analysts said on Monday. Chicago wheat futures slid for a sixth straight session on a lack of demand for U.S. cargoes despite tightening world supplies. The rouble touched its weakest level against the dollar since April 2016 last week amid new U.S. sanctions. Click here to read full stories.

 

Aug 28 - U.S. corn seen 68 pct good/excellent, soybeans 65 pct - poll

The U.S. Department of Agriculture was likely to leave weekly crop condition ratings unchanged for both soybeans and corn, according to a Reuters poll on Monday. Condition ratings tend to decline this time of year as crops approach maturity, but widespread rains last week benefited fields in some areas, analysts said. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 28 - China's ag ministry: recent rise in vegetable prices due to normal seasonal fluctuations 

Recent vegetable price increases are due to seasonal fluctuations and are not the result of flooding at a major vegetable growing region in eastern China, the country's Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said on Tuesday. The statement was issued to address the rising vegetable prices and comes at a time when inflation in China has moved somewhat higher over the past two months. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 28 - Ukraine plans no immediate review of wheat export memorandum 

The Ukrainian agriculture ministry has no immediate plan to review a memorandum agreed with traders this month allowing for the export of 8 million tonnes of milling wheat this season, a senior ministry official said on Monday. Traders last week said that unfavourable spring and summer weather had worsened the quality of Ukrainian wheat in the 2018 harvest and that milling wheat accounted for less than 45 percent of the total. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 28 - Crop Watch: U.S. corn, soy set for big yields and an early harvest -Braun 

The Crop Watch corn and soybean yield expectations are now the most elevated of the season as timely rains and the lack of extreme August heat have provided good finishing weather for the subject fields. For the most part, crops are a week or two ahead of normal development pace, meaning that the harvest will start earlier than usual this year in many locations across the country. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 28 - Malaysia's palm oil output to decline in 2018 - analyst Mielke 

Malaysia's palm oil production is expected to dip in 2018 due to lower yields, analyst Thomas Mielke said at a Kuala Lumpur industry event on Tuesday. Output from Malaysia, the world's second-biggest palm oil producer, will fall to 19.8 million tonnes this year from 19.92 million tonnes last year, Mielke said. He had earlier forecast annual production would rise to 20.2 million tonnes. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 28 - Senalia to halt grain intake at Rouen port silo due to works 

French silo operator Senalia will stop taking delivery and loading grains at its 250,000 tonne Grand-Couronne silo near the port of Rouen, the Europe Union's largest grain export hub, for more than four months due to modernisation works at the site. Other silos and docks managed by Senalia, one of the delivery points for wheat traded on Euronext's futures market, will remain open, reducing the impact on export flows, Senalia Director General Gilles Kindelberger said on Monday. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 27 - German ministry sees big drop in grains crop due to drought

The Agriculture Ministry forecast on Friday that Germany's 2018 winter wheat harvest would fall 19.1 percent from the 2017 level to 19.4 million tonnes after crops suffered from drought and hot weather. The ministry also forecast Germany's 2018 grains harvest would be 34.5 million tonnes, down 15.8 percent on the year. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 27 - Brazil court yet to rule on glyphosate, minister says tweet was wrong 

Brazil's Agriculture Minister Blairo Maggi tweeted on Friday that he had incorrectly stated a day earlier that a court had lifted an injunction on products containing the widely used herbicide glyphosate and that a ruling was still pending. An appeal is still pending on an Aug. 3 ruling that new products containing the chemical could not be registered in the country and existing registrations would be suspended as of September, until health authority Anvisa issues a decision on its re-evaluation of glyphosate's safety. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 27 - China to release state wheat reserves after weather damages output 

China will release state wheat reserves after bad weather curbed output in major growing areas this year, an official at the country's grain administration said, the Xinhua news agency reported. Chen Shuyu, spokesman for the State Grain and Reserves Administration, said in an interview with Xinhua on Friday state wheat inventories were still ample despite the drop in output and market supplies would be fully guaranteed. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 27 - China's soybean, soymeal futures fall on African swine fever worries 

China's soybean and soymeal futures fell in early trade on Monday, hit by concerns that outbreaks of African swine fever in China may reduce demand for feed, along with forecasts for a record U.S. crop. China's soybean futures fell 1.7 percent to 3,594 yuan ($522.84) per tonne, their lowest levels in almost 10 years. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 27 - Pro Farmer forecasts record-large U.S. soybean harvest

Advisory service Pro Farmer, a division of Farm Journal Media, on Friday projected 2018 U.S. soybean production would be a record-large 4.683 billion bushels based on an average yield of 53.0 bushels per acre (bpa). Pro Farmer's soybean crop forecast topped the U.S. Department of Agriculture's already record outlook for a crop of 4.586 billion bushels as this week's crop tour found larger-than-expected soy pod counts in all states surveyed. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 27 - South Africa's maize harvest seen marginally lower than previous estimate - poll

South Africa's maize harvest forecast is expected to be slightly lower than previously estimated as crop yields could fall in some regions due to unfavourable weather conditions, a Reuters poll of five analysts showed on Friday. The government's Crop Estimates Committee (CEC) is seen pegging the harvest at 13.11 million tonnes in its seventh estimate, down 0.7 percent from the 13.207 million tonnes the CEC estimated in July. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 27 - Cargill recalls 25,000 lbs of possibly contaminated beef 

A Cargill Meat Solutions plant in Colorado is recalling more than 25,000 pounds (11,300 kg) of ground beef that could be contaminated with E. Coli, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said. The meat carries an "EST. 86R" label inside the USDA mark of inspection and a use-by date of Sept. 5, the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service said this week in a statement. It was shipped from Cargill's facility in Fort Morgan, Colorado, to warehouses in California and Colorado, FSIS said. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 27 - Philippines eyes extra 132,000T rice imports amid 'crisis' in south 

The Philippines' agriculture minister said on Monday he has proposed the importation of an additional 132,000 tonnes of rice by the private sector to address "very limited" supplies of the staple food in the country's southern provinces. Agriculture Secretary Emmanuel Piñol said he had formally recommended the "special" importation to President Rodrigo Duterte, and the National Food Authority (NFA) Council would meet on Tuesday to consider the request. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 27 - African swine fever hits Romania's biggest pig farm

Romania has confirmed an outbreak of deadly African swine fever at the country's largest pig breeding farm and all 140,000 animals will be culled, the national food safety authority ANSVSA's office in the affected region said on Saturday. The farm complex, which consists of three adjoining properties and is located in the southern county of Braila, is owned by Romanian company TEBU Consult. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 24 - African swine fever: China marks new front in battle against deadly disease 

China is battling to control the rapid spread of deadly African swine fever (ASF) across the world's largest hog herd after four outbreaks in three weeks, stoking worries the disease could spread to Southeast Asia. The discovery of ASF in China, which accounts for nearly half the world's pork production and is the world's highest per capita consumer of the meat, marks a new front in the disease's spread from Europe through Russia. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 24 - Drones offer high-tech help to Japan's ageing farmers 

The next generation farmhand in Japan's ageing rural heartland may be a drone. For several months, developers and farmers in northeast Japan have been testing a new drone that can hover above paddy fields and perform backbreaking tasks in a fraction of the time it takes for elderly farmers. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 24 - IGC raises forecast for 2018/19 world corn crop 

The International Grains Council on Thursday raised its forecast for world corn (maize) production in the 2018/19 season, largely driven by an improved crop outlook in the United States. The inter-governmental body, in a monthly update, put world corn production in 2018/19 at 1.064 billion tonnes, up 12 million from its previous projection. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 24 - Russian grain stocks to hit lowest in six years by June 30 - SovEcon 

Grain stocks in Russia, one of the world's largest wheat exporters, are expected to hit their lowest level in six years by the end of the 2018/19 marketing season on June 30, the SovEcon consultancy said in a note on Thursday. Russia's wheat crop has been hit this year as a dry spring and summer ended five years of plenty in many wheat-producing regions and drew down reserves of major exporters to their lowest level since 2007/08, when low stocks contributed to food riots across Africa and Asia.  Click here to read full stories.

Aug 24 - US ag secretary: Farm aid details to be disclosed Monday 

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said on Thursday that details of a planned $12 billion aid package for U.S. farmers hurt by the Trump administration's trade wars will be disclosed on Monday. Perdue, who previously told Reuters the plan would include between $7 billion and $8 billion in direct cash relief for farmers, said it was being reviewed by the Office of Management and Budget. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 24 - Brazil court lifts injunction suspending products with glyphosate 

A Brazilian court has lifted an injunction that had suspended registration in the country of products containing the agrochemical glyphosate, Agriculture Minister Blairo Maggi said on Thursday on his official Twitter account. The move overturns an Aug. 3 court ruling, which determined that new products containing glyphosate could not be registered and existing registrations would be suspended starting from September pending a re-evaluation of the chemical's safety by health agency Anvisa. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 24 - Brazil meat sector reels from trade bans, transport woes 

Brazil's meat-packing sector is facing a grim year as trade embargos, stricter client demands and domestic transport disruptions weighed on the world's top chicken and fourth-biggest pork exporter. According to projections by industry group ABPA released on Thursday, Brazil's chicken exports could fall to around 4.20 million tonnes in 2018, from 4.32 million tonnes last year, due to a European Union ban on the Brazilian product in April. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 24 - UK food exports to EU may be stalled by "no deal" Brexit - NFU 

Britain could be barred from exporting some food to the European Union for months if it leaves the bloc without a deal, the National Farmers Union said on Thursday after the government published reports on that scenario.  One government paper on the possible impact on organic food said British businesses would only be able to export to the EU if they were certified by an organic control body recognised and approved by the EU to operate in the UK. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 24 - Argentina 2018-19 corn planting area seen at 9.35 mln hectares - government 

Argentine farmers are expected to plant 9.35 million hectares of corn in the 2018-19 crop year, compared to 9.1 million hectares last season, the government said on Thursday in its monthly report. Government corn planting figures include commercially used cornfields and non-commercial corn for animal feed. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 23 - Crop damage mounts for EU farmers after torrid summer 

European farmers are counting the cost of a summer heatwave that has shrunk cereal harvests and shrivelled pastures, leaving some farms struggling to survive and shutting the EU out of lucrative export markets. The severe weather in Europe has coincided with adverse growing conditions in other major grain producing zones such as Russia and Australia, raising the risk that supplies in exporting countries will be eroded to their smallest in years. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 23 - China's COFCO Meat imports pork from Chile, Europe as U.S. trade war bites 

COFCO Meat Holdings Ltd has imported pork from Chile, the European Union and alternative countries, the Chinese pig farming company said on Wednesday, as Beijing's hefty tariffs on U.S. pork upends traditional trade routes. The subsidiary of China's state-owned grains-to-property conglomerate COFCO said its trading division had diversified origins for its pork imports and developed customers from other countries to cope with the impact of the deepening trade war between the world's top two economies. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 23 - China July grains imports fall sharply after U.S. tariffs 

China's grains imports fell sharply in July after Beijing imposed hefty tariffs on shipments from the United States amid a deepening trade conflict, customs data showed on Thursday. China brought in 220,000 tonnes of sorghum in July, down 62.5 percent from 588,364 tonnes a year ago, data from the General Administration of Customs showed. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 23 - Germany pledges up to 340 mln euros in farm aid after drought 

The German government will launch a special aid programme worth up to 340 million euros to help farmers after this summer's drought massively damaged harvests, agriculture minister Julia Kloeckner said on Wednesday. Kloeckner said she had agreed special federal government drought aid of between 150 million and 170 million euros ($172 million and $194 million) with German finance minister Olaf Scholz. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 23 - China corn rallies as Beijing signals support for ethanol plan 

China's corn futures were on track for their biggest one-day jump since May on Thursday after the central government said it would promote the use of ethanol in vehicles, its first public statement on its ambitious biofuel policy in almost a year. China will promote the use of ethanol in 15 regions this year, including Beijing and Tianjin municipalities and Hebei province, said a post on the government's official website that summarised a Wednesday meeting of the nation's State Council. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 23 - U.S. poultry industry to urge retaliation if South Africa ends quota 

The United States poultry industry will press its government to retaliate if South Africa suspends a quota that excludes some U.S. imports from an anti-dumping tariff, the head of a poultry trade group said. The South African Poultry Association (SAPA) has filed a lawsuit seeking to force the government to suspend the quota in response to the Trump administration's decision to impose tariffs on aluminium and steel imports from South Africa. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 23 - Ukrainian wheat quality hit by poor weather - traders 

Unfavourable spring and summer weather has worsened the quality of Ukrainian wheat in the 2018 harvest and the share of milling wheat does not exceed 45 percent, traders said on Wednesday. An extremely dry spring and torrential rains during the threshing period have affected quality and the portion of feed wheat has jumped to more than 70 percent in northern Ukrainian regions. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 23 - China reports fourth African swine fever outbreak - ministry 

China, home to the world's largest pig herd, reported its fourth outbreak of deadly African swine fever on Thursday, with more than 400 pigs infected on three farms, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said in a statement. The infection killed 340 hogs in the city of Wenzhou in Zhejiang province, it said. Click here to read full stories.

 

Aug 23 - Arlon's Brazil freight unit grain shipments seen up 18 pct in 2018 

Freight company Sotran SA Logistica e Transporte, a unit of U.S.-based Arlon Group in Brazil, expects its grain shipments to rise 18 percent this year due to Chinese demand for Brazilian soybeans and a strong dollar, an executive said. A trade spat between the United States and China supported demand for grain transportation contracts through September, with Chinese buyers paying a premium for Brazilian soy, helping Sotran stay on target despite disruption from a truckers' strike, Director of New Business Rosler Dallamaria said. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 23 - Ukraine grain exports at 4.6 mln T so far in 2018/19 

Ukraine has exported 4.6 million tonnes of grain since the season began in July, down from around 4.9 million tonnes at the same point last season, Ukraine's agriculture ministry said on Wednesday. So far in the (July-June) 2018/19 season, Ukraine has exported 2.3 million tonnes of wheat, 1.19 million tonnes of barley and 1 million tonnes of maize, it said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 22 : Malaysian Cash Market Prices for Palm Oil Unavailable
Data for Malaysian cash market prices for palm oil are unavailable due to a holiday (Aïd el kebir)

Aug 22 - Global wheat supply to crisis levels; big China stocks won't provide relief 

A scorching hot, dry summer has ended five years of plenty in many wheat producing countries and drawn down the reserves of major exporters to their lowest level since 2007/08, when low grain stocks contributed to food riots across Africa and Asia. Although global stocks are expected to hit an all-time high of 273 million tonnes at the start of the 2018/19 grain marketing season, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates, the problem is nearly half of it is in China, which is not likely to release any onto global markets.Click here to read full stories.

Aug 22 - Russian agriculture minister sees no need for wheat export duty for now - RIA 

Russia's agriculture minister sees no reason for now to introduce an export duty on wheat and is not considering one, he was quoted as saying by RIA news agency on Tuesday. A meeting at the agriculture ministry on Friday fuelled speculation among traders that Russia could consider grain export curbs once exports reach 30 million tonnes in the 2018/19 marketing season that began on July 1. The ministry denied export limits were discussed.  Click here to read full stories.

Aug 22 - Brazil's Gavilon aims to be top non-traditional soybean exporter to China 

Grains origination company Gavilon do Brasil could become Brazil's largest non-traditional, "asset-light" soybean exporter to China in three years despite being a relatively new player here, a top executive said. Brazil general manager Fabrício Mazaia said in an interview the firm could reach that goal without immediately investing in assets such as port facilities or processing plants. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 22 - Flock on: Mongolia meat exporters turn to Iran's halal markets 

Mongolian butcher Kuntuguan Ajbai chants under his breath as he slits the throat of a sheep with a single stroke of his sharpened knife, making sure the animal's swift death is halal – acceptable under the laws of Islam. Kuntuguan's work at a slaughterhouse in the city of Darkhan, about 100 miles (160 km) from the nation's capital, comes amid surging demand from Iran for halal meat and as Mongolia pushes to make more money from the huge herds of livestock that roam its vast grasslands. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 22 - Brazil farmers poised to plant record soy area in 2018/19 - poll

Brazilian farmers were forecast to expand the country's soybean planted area for the 12th consecutive year amid strong demand from Asia and in spite of risks related to the exchange rate and higher freight costs, according to a Reuters poll of analysts on Tuesday. Brazil is likely to expand the area to a record 36.28 million hectares (89.65 million acres) this season, which farmers will start planting around September, a 3.2 percent expansion from the previous cycle based on government data. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 22 - Swiss government urges voters to reject more state help for farmers 

The Swiss government urged voters on Tuesday to reject more help for farmers and other proposals for agriculture in a referendum next month, saying they would send food prices rocketing and hurt the economy. Switzerland will two hold referendums on Sept. 23 - one on giving more state support to farmers and another on introducing more sustainable and animal-friendly agricultural practices. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 22 - India's rapeseed meal exports to jump on Chinese buying - trade body official 

India's rapeseed meal exports are likely to jump 50 percent in 2018/19 from a year ago to 1 million tonnes as neighbouring China is set to resume imports from New Delhi after nearly seven years, a leading industry official said on Tuesday. China was biggest buyer of India rapeseed meal until it banned purchases in late 2011 over quality concerns. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 22 - South African poultry group targets U.S. import quota 

The South African Poultry Association (SAPA) has filed a lawsuit seeking to force the government to suspend a quota that excludes some U.S. poultry imports from an anti-dumping tariff, a senior official with the association said on Tuesday. If successful, the move - a response to the Trump administration's decision to impose tariffs on aluminium and steel imports - could put at risk duty-free access to the U.S. market for nearly $2 billion worth of South African exports. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 22 - Indonesia revises palm crop fund rules to back biodiesel drive 

Indonesia made public on Tuesday a revised regulation that gives the country's palm crop fund more leeway to support the expanded use of biodiesel in Southeast Asia's largest economy. Indonesia announced plans this month to require all diesel fuel used in the country to contain a 20 percent bio-component from September. The move aims to reduce diesel fuel imports, boost palm oil consumption and support the rupiah currency. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 22 - New Zealand's a2 Milk annual profit doubles on China demand 

New Zealand's a2 Milk Company said its annual profit more than doubled on Wednesday, above market expectations and supported by rising demand in dairy-hungry China, but it flagged higher costs ahead as it seeks to stay competitive. A2 reported a net profit after tax of NZ$195.7 million ($129.9 million) for the year ended June 30, soaring 116 percent from the previous year. It surpassed the NZ$189.3 million average forecast of analysts polled by Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 22 - Australia cancels livestock shipper's live export licence after sheep deaths at sea 

Australia's government has cancelled the live export licence of the country's biggest livestock shipper, Emanuel Exports Pty Ltd, after investigating the death of thousands of sheep during a shipment to the Middle East last year. In a statement issued late on Tuesday, the government didn't specify why the licence had been revoked, but said the move followed "a thorough investigation and show cause process". Click here to read full stories.

Aug 21 - Russian traders may speed up grain exports amid risks of curbs 

Russian exporters may step up grain shipments in the next few months in anticipation that the government could put curbs on exports sometime after December, traders said. Speculation about potential export limits in Russia, the world's biggest wheat exporter, pushed global wheat prices sharply higher on Friday, adding to worries about tightening global supplies after drought has cut harvests from the Black Sea to Europe and Australia. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 21 - Sweden's summer drought slashes 2018 crop output forecast

Drought over the summer has led to sharply lower yield prospects for Sweden's cereal and oilseeds harvest this year, the public agricultural agency said on Monday. The Swedish Board of Agriculture, which acts as the government's expert authority for agricultural and food policy, estimated total cereal production would be 29 percent lower year-on-year at 4.2 million tonnes in 2018. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 21 - Pest attack, scanty rains to dent India cotton exports - trade body head 

India is likely to export 7 million bales of cotton in 2018/19, down 30 percent from an earlier estimate, as scanty rainfall and an attack of pink bollworms are likely to squeeze crop yields, the head of a leading trade body told Reuters. Lower shipments from the world's biggest producer of the fibre amid rising demand from top consumer China could support global prices, which on Monday were trading near their lowest level in over four months. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 21 - Major Chinese pig farmer says farms idle as rising feed costs hit profit 

Beijing Dabeinong Technology said on Monday a big portion of its newly expanded pig farming capacity is idle, increasing production costs and pushing one of China's top pig farmers and feedmakers into its first loss in years. It also blamed weak second-quarter results on the rising cost of feed ingredients, including soymeal. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 21 - Indonesia sets palm biofuel plant condition for jet purchases from US, France - minister 

Indonesia has asked for its companies to be allowed to build palm oil jet fuel plants in the United States and France as a condition for its airlines to buy Boeing Co and Airbus SE planes, its trade minister said. This marks the latest effort by the world's biggest palm oil producer to find ways to help mop up output of the tropical oil, its second-largest export, that is increasingly unwelcome in the European Union (EU) and United States given environmental and competitive concerns. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 21 - Nutrien steers potash recovery as BHP waits in the wings 

Canada's Nutrien Ltd, the world's biggest potash miner by capacity, has helped engineer a surprising price rebound for the fertilizer by idling capacity. Now the trick will be keeping prices from appreciating too much to ensure a major would-be competitor, BHP Billiton Plc, stays on the sidelines. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 21 - Hot dry weather could cut Ukraine's maize yield, hamper winter sowing 

Dry and hot weather across most Ukrainian regions may reduce the maize yield and could affect the 2019 winter grain sowing, analyst UkrAgroConsult said on Monday. "This (hot and dry weather) adversely affects the completion of growth of late crops and hampers the accumulation of soil moisture for sowing 2019-harvest winter crops," it said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 21 - Above-average corn, soybean potential seen in southeast S.Dakota 

Favorable late-season rains and milder temperatures should result in above-average corn and soybean yields in southeast South Dakota, according to crop scouts on an annual survey of the top U.S. production states. But a more advanced corn crop could trim yield potential slightly as hot weather earlier in the summer accelerated crop maturity and may prevent kernels from fattening as much as they would in a more prolonged season, scouts said on the first day of the four-day Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 21 - Russian wheat prices fell last week due to weak rouble 

Russian wheat export prices fell last week on the back of a weaker rouble currency, which is close to its lowest level since April 2016 due to threats of more U.S. sanctions, analysts said on Monday. The decline in prices, however, was limited by speculation about potential export limits in Russia, the world's biggest wheat exporter. Russian exporters may step up grain shipments in the next few months in anticipation that the government could put curbs on exports sometime after December, traders said.  Click here to read full stories.

Aug 21 - Bulgaria wheat crop down to 5.3 tonnes due to unfavourable weather 

Bulgaria reaped 5.3 million tonnes of wheat from 98.3 percent of the sown area by Aug. 20, below the 5.7 million tonnes harvested a year earlier, mainly due to unfavourable weather in July, the agriculture ministry said on Monday. The ministry had said in June that it hoped the wheat crop would match last year's bumper crop but last month's extensive rains have hit wheat sowings. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 20 - Russia agriculture ministry meets grain exporters on volumes

Russia's agriculture ministry said it held a meeting on Friday with grain exporters to discuss export volumes of grains. Traders, including some who were at the meeting, said the ministry will consider curbing 2018/19 exports once they reach 30 million tonnes following a request from meat producing regions, but added no decision had been made about how this might be implemented. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 20 - U.S. drops agriculture demand from NAFTA talks - Mexico farm lobby 

The United States has dropped a contentious demand from the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement to impose restrictions on Mexican agricultural exports, Mexico's top farm lobby said on Sunday. Talks to rework the 24-year-old pact are entering a crucial phase and Mexican Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo said outstanding bilateral issues between Mexico and the United States could be resolved by the middle of this week. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 20 - India's palm oil imports set to hit 6-year low - industry official 

India's palm oil imports are likely to fall 15 percent in 2017/18 from the year before to their lowest in six years, hit by a hike in import taxes, a weaker rupee and tighter credit for would-be buyers, a senior industry official told Reuters. Reduced purchases by the world's top importer of the oil, where it is widely used to fry foods such as samosas or bhajis, could pile more pressure on benchmark international futures that are already trading near their lowest in three years. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 20 - Funds buy CBOT grains, unfazed by heavy USDA numbers - Braun 

Chicago-traded grain and oilseed futures were pummeled on Aug. 10 over bearish government forecasts, but speculators actually bought contracts on the net during the period, against market expectations. Among CBOT corn, wheat and soybeans, analysts had expected money managers to be net sellers of about 56,000 futures and options contracts through Aug. 14, but instead they bought about 4,500 contracts on the net. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 20 - Australia boosts aid by A$1.8 bln for drought-hit farmers 

Australia's federal government announced on Sunday a A$1.8-billion ($1.32-billion) increase in funding for drought-afflicted farmers, with parts of the country's east coast suffering the driest conditions in living memory. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull pledged the support, in addition to the A$576 previously announced, during a visit to Forbes, a town in New South Wales, where farmers are facing drought conditions. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 20 - Third U.S. soybean vessel left in limbo off China unloads cargo 

The Cemtex Pioneer, a vessel carrying U.S. soybeans that was caught up in the China-U.S. trade row, has left east China's port of Nantong near Shanghai, according to shipping data on Thomson Reuters Eikon on Sunday. The vessel's draft is now at 58 percent of its maximum, indicating that it has unloaded its cargo, according to the Eikon data, which showed the ship now headed for the Australian port of Abbot Point. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 20 - Crop Watch: Strong corn, soy prospects bolstered by weekend rains 

All the Crop Watch corn and soybean fields in the Upper Midwest and Northern Plains needed some moisture as of Saturday, but a widespread rain system began moving across the area late in the day. The system will continue eastward through the beginning of the week, which is particularly supportive of the government's optimistic soybean yield forecast. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 20 - Chinese soymeal falls on Sino-U.S. trade talks, swine fever 

China's soymeal futures were down over 1.8 percent in early trade on Monday, their biggest daily drop since early June. Prices fell as worries about the impact of the U.S.-China trade spat eased but concerns mounted over falling demand for livestock feed as China confirmed its third case of the deadly African swine fever. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 20 - Third African swine fever outbreak hits China's hog herd 

China's Ministry of Agriculture said on Sunday 88 hogs had died from African swine fever in the eastern city of Lianyungang, the third outbreak this month, as the highly-contagious disease threatened to spread through the world's biggest pig herd. A total of 615 hogs have been infected since Aug. 15 with the swine fever in Lianyungang, in Jiangsu province, where authorities have banned the movement of hogs, related products and animals that are easily infected both into and outside the affected area, the ministry said. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 20 - Brazil's Marfrig to sell U.S. unit to Tyson for $2.5 bln - sources 

Brazilian meatpacker Marfrig Global Foods SA has agreed to sell its U.S. subsidiary, a key McDonald's supplier, to Tyson Foods Inc for $2.5 billion, two people with knowledge of the matter told Reuters on Friday. Marfrig shares rose as much as 8 percent but reversed gains and were down 7.3 percent at 6.38 reais as investors reassessed the price of the deal. Tyson rose 1.2 percent to $61.71. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 20 - EU wheat harvests shrink, but quality remains good - analysts 

Wheat harvests in major European Union countries are winding down with drought having shrunk crop sizes but quality generally good, analysts said on Friday. "The market consensus emerging is that German new-crop wheat is generally decent quality with good protein content,” one German analyst said, referring to production in the European Union's second-largest producer. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 17 - U.S. seed sellers push for limits on Monsanto, BASF weed killer

America's two biggest independent seed sellers, Beck's Hybrids and Stine Seed, told Reuters they are pushing U.S. environmental regulators to bar farmers from spraying dicamba weed killer during upcoming summers in a potential blow to Bayer AG's Monsanto Co. Limiting spraying of the chemical to the spring season, before crops are planted, would prevent farmers from using the herbicide on dicamba-resistant soybeans that Monsanto engineered. The seeds are sold by companies including Beck's and Stine. Click here to read full stories

Aug 17 - World's top pork supplier shuts China slaughterhouse in race to contain deadly swine fever

China has ordered the world's top pork producer, WH Group Ltd, to shut a major slaughterhouse as authorities race to stop the spread of deadly African swine fever (ASF) after a second outbreak in the planet's biggest hog herd in two weeks. The discovery of infected pigs in Zhengzhou city, in central Henan province, about 1,000 kilometres from the first case ever reported in China, has stirred animal health experts' fears of fresh outbreaks - as well as food safety concerns among the public. Click here to read full stories

Aug 17 - Ban on glyphosate would be 'disaster' for Brazil agriculture - minister

A potential ban on the popular herbicide glyphosate in Brazil over concerns it may cause cancer in humans would be a "disaster" for the country's agricultural industry, Agriculture Minister Blairo Maggi said on Thursday. A Brazilian court ruled on Aug. 3 that new products containing the chemical could not be registered in the country and existing registrations would be suspended starting from September, until health authority Anvisa issues a decision on its re-evaluation of glyphosate's safety. Click here to read full stories

Aug 17 - Jordan tenders again to buy 120,000 tonnes wheat –trade

Jordan's main state grains buyer has again issued an international tender to purchase 120,000 tonnes of hard milling wheat, European traders said on Thursday. Tender deadline is Aug. 29. Shipment is sought in various possibilities in 50,000 tonne consignments between Nov. 1 and Dec. 31, they said. Click here to read full stories

Aug 16 - NOPA July soy crush 167.733, second biggest monthly total 

U.S. processors crushed a bigger-than-expected 167.733 million bushels of soybeans during July, their second largest monthly total ever, the National Oilseed Processors Association (NOPA) said on Wednesday. Strong profit margins, stemming from low soybean acquisition costs, encouraged processors to boost their crushing pace during the month.  Click here to read full stories.

Aug 16 - Ukraine exports wheat mostly to Asia, the Middle East in July 

Asian and Middle East countries were the leading buyers of Ukrainian wheat in July, the first month of the new 2018/19 season, data by analyst UkrAgroConsult showed on Wednesday. Ukraine is among the world's major wheat exporters and sold a total of 17.2 million tonnes of wheat abroad in the previous 2017/18 season. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 16 - Global soybean demand is rising without China's help - Braun  

The United States has been recently shipping larger amounts of soybeans to destinations other than China, including those who are not heavy U.S. customers, and the increased activity has some market participants skeptical as to why these other countries would suddenly need so many soybeans. It is easy to lose sight of soybean demand in other countries when China accounts for nearly two-thirds of all global imports. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 16 - Emerging market currency woes trigger palm oil demand concerns 

Sliding emerging market currencies are ringing alarm bells among traders concerned that palm oil demand will weaken across the region from China to Iran, as reduced purchasing power cuts into imports into countries like Turkey and India. With a plunging Turkish lira dragging down peer currencies, traders say they already see Indian buyers bargaining with key suppliers in Malaysia, the world's no. 2 producer, for lower prices. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 16 - Canada to phase out crop chemicals linked to bee deaths 

The Canadian government said on Wednesday it would move to restrict use of two types of crop chemicals that have been linked to deaths of aquatic insects and bees, in a victory for environmentalists and the latest setback for companies that sell the pesticides. Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) said it would phase out, over three to five years, the outdoor use of thiamethoxam, made by Syngenta AG, and clothianidin, produced by Bayer AG. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 16 - Argentina 2018-19 corn area seen at record 5.8 mln hectares - exchange 

Argentine farmers are expected to plant a record-high 5.8 million hectares with corn in the 2018-19 crop year, due to favorable prices and weather conditions, the Buenos Aires grains exchange said in a report on Wednesday. That would exceed the 5.4 million hectares planted for the 2017-18 crop, which despite high expectations, yielded just 31 million tonnes due to a severe summer drought in the world's No. 3 exporter of the grain. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 16 - Germany confirms aid for animal feed after drought 

Germany has confirmed it will relax some environmental conservation rules to help farmers overcome a sharp rise in animal feed prices after this summer's drought, the agriculture minister said on Wednesday. Agriculture Minister Julia Kloeckner also said she would await official crop figures before deciding on a response to calls for 1 billion euros ($1.13 billion) in crisis state aid requested by German farmers. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 16 - Food company JBS needs to raise prices to offset Brazil grain costs 

Brazilian food company JBS SA would need to raise product prices by another 7 percent at its processed foods division Seara to offset a surge in feed costs, executives said on Wednesday. Seara raised prices by 3 percent in the second quarter, the executives said on a conference calls with analysts to discuss second-quarter results. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 15 - Monsanto Roundup appeal has uphill climb on 'junk science' grounds - legal experts 

Bayer AG unit Monsanto faces long odds on an appeal blaming an "inflamed" jury and "junk science" for a verdict of $289 million in damages to a man who said the company's Roundup weed killer caused his cancer, according to some legal experts. Last week's verdict ended the first trial over whether glyphosate, the main ingredient in Roundup, causes cancer. Monsanto, which says decades of scientific studies have shown Roundup and glyphosate are safe, is facing about 5,000 similar lawsuits nationwide. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 15 - Argentina suspends cuts in soymeal, soyoil export taxes 

Argentina has suspended for six months its program of gradually cutting taxes on exports of soymeal and soyoil, the Treasury Ministry said in a statement on Tuesday, part of the government's fiscal tightening program. International shipments of both soy products are currently taxed at 23 percent, lowered gradually from 32 percent in 2015, the statement said. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 15 - Soy exports' recent boost to U.S. economy likely short-lived - Braun 

The U.S. economy grew at its fastest pace in nearly four years during the second quarter of 2018, and bigger soybean exports were cited as a primary contributor. This is more likely a one-off factor than a growing trend, however, given the relatively modest impact of soybean exports on the larger U.S. economy and the less optimistic outlook for U.S. soybean trade over the next year. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 15 - Brazil on track for a record soy crop next year - Céleres

Brazilian farmers are expected to plant a record amount of soybean acres this coming season, encouraged by strong demand from China, and yield a record harvest next year, consultancy Céleres said on Tuesday in its first forecast for the new cycle. The next crop cycle in Brazil, the world's No. 1 soybean exporter, begins in September. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 15 - Egypt's GASC buys 420,000 tonnes of wheat 

Egypt's state grain buyer, the General Authority for Supply Commodities (GASC), said on Tuesday it had purchased 420,000 tonnes of wheat in international tenders for two shipment periods. GASC purchased 240,000 tonnes for shipment Sept. 21-30 and 180,000 tonnes for shipment Oct. 1-10, traders said. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 15 - China's Liaoning culls over 8,000 hogs after African swine fever outbreak 

Northeast China's Liaoning province has now culled 8,116 hogs in response to an outbreak of African swine fever earlier this month, the provincial animal husbandry bureau told Reuters on Wednesday. No new cases have been discovered in provincial capital Shenyang, where the deadly fever has so far been contained, since the outbreak on Aug. 3, a spokesman for the bureau said, confirming a report in the state-run People's Daily. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 15 - Grain fungus spurs rejection of some North Dakota wheat - merchants 

Elevated levels of the grain fungus ergot are showing up in spring wheat being harvested in south-central North Dakota, prompting grain elevators to impose discounts and even turn some truckloads away, grain merchants said on Tuesday. Ergot is a common grain fungus but some major buyers, including top global wheat importer Egypt, have rejected cargoes with even trace amounts in the past. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 15 - As China trade row deepens, WH Group boosts U.S. pork exports to Japan, S.Korea 

WH Group Ltd, the world's largest pork company, has boosted its U.S. exports to Japan, South Korea and Mexico to reduce the impact of the trade spat between Washington and Beijing, Chairman Wan Long said on Tuesday. The comment was made at a briefing after the company, which also owns Smithfield Foods in the United States, warned in its first-half earnings its biggest challenge is the overabundance of meat in the United States and uncertainty over growing trade tensions between the United States and its trading partners. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 14 - Brazil's farmers dump sugar for soy as trade war boosts Chinese demand 

Last year, Brazilian farmer Gustavo Lopes sized up his sugarcane plantation against his soybean fields. He looked at global trends, including rising U.S.-China trade tensions and a stubborn sugar-market glut. Then he tore up the last of his cane fields and ditched a decades-old supply contract with a local sugar mill. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 14 - Roundup cancer verdict sends Bayer shares sliding 

Bayer shares plunged as much as 14 percent on Monday, losing about $14 billion in value, after newly acquired Monsanto was ordered to pay $289 million in damages in the first of possibly thousands of U.S. lawsuits over alleged links between a weedkiller and cancer. After the verdict in favour of a California school groundskeeper with terminal cancer, Monsanto faces more than 5,000 similar lawsuits across the United States over claims it did not warn of the cancer risks of glyphosate-based weedkillers, including its Roundup brand. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 14 - Rally in Russian wheat export prices slows 

A sharp rise in Russian wheat export prices slowed last week and analysts forecast further decreases after a monthly crop supply and demand report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture raised Russia's 2018/2019 harvest forecast, analysts said on Monday. The monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report, published on Friday, raised the forecast for Russia's 2018/2019 wheat crop by 1 million tonnes to 68 million. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 14 - NOPA sees U.S. July soy crush at 161.745 mln bushels - survey 

U.S. processors likely maintained a heavy crushing pace during July as they sought to take advantage of strong profit margins, analysts said ahead of a monthly National Oilseed Processors Association (NOPA) report. NOPA members, who handle about 95 percent of all soybeans processed in the United States, likely crushed 161.745 million bushels of soybeans last month, according to an average of estimates given by nine analysts in a Reuters survey.  Click here to read full stories.

Aug 14 - China unloads U.S. soybean cargo amid public worries about cost of trade war 

A vessel carrying U.S. soybeans was unloading its cargo worth at least $23 million at the Chinese port of Dalian on Monday, becoming one of the first shipments to incur hefty new import duties as the trade row deepens between Beijing and Washington. The docking of the vessel after five weeks anchored off China's coast ended long-running speculation over the fate of the cargo, which had captured public attention. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 14 - U.S. corn, soy crop condition ratings likely to decline - poll

The U.S. Department of Agriculture was expected to cut crop condition ratings for corn, soybeans and spring wheat due to dry weather in parts of the country and as some fields died naturally ahead of harvest, according to a Reuters poll on Monday. The USDA in a weekly report due at 3 p.m. CDT (2000 GMT) was likely to rate the U.S. corn crop at 70 percent good to excellent, down 1 percentage point from a week ago, according to an average of estimates by 10 analysts. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 14 - Crop Watch: Strong yields on tap, though the U.S. north eyes rain - Braun 

Above-average corn and soybean yields are still expected among the eight U.S. Crop Watch 2018 fields, but a dry pattern in the far northern Corn Belt threatens to cap potential in those areas. Most of the Crop Watch producers, especially from Iowa to Ohio, are feeling confident about their soybean yields as pod counts are high and rains are expected in the coming days.  Click here to read full stories.

Aug 14 - Egypt's GASC seeks wheat for Sept. 21-30, Oct. 1-10 shipments 

Egypt's General Authority for Supply Commodities (GASC) set tenders on Monday to buy an unspecified amount of wheat from global suppliers for shipment Sept. 21-30 and from Oct. 1-10. GASC Vice Chairman Ahmed Youssef said the authority was seeking to buy cargoes of soft and/or milling wheat from the United States, Canada, Australia, France, Germany, Poland, Argentina, Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary and Paraguay. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 14 - Wilmar Q2 profit surges on oilseeds and grains business 

Singapore-listed commodity trader Wilmar International Ltd posted a five-fold rise in second-quarter net profit, helped by its oilseeds and grains segment that benefited from higher volumes and crush margins. The company, whose top shareholders include U.S. agricultural trader Archer Daniels Midland Co, reported a net profit of $316.4 million for the three months ended June, compared with $59 million a year earlier. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 13 - US soybean cargo docks in Chinese port after weeks at anchor amid trade row 

A ship carrying soybeans from the United States docked in the port of Dalian on Saturday, more than a month after it arrived off China's coast just as hefty tariffs were imposed on U.S. goods, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon shipping data. The short journey into the northern Chinese port was the first by Peak Pegasus, which has 70,000 tonnes of U.S. soybeans on board, since it arrived off the coast on July 6 shortly after Beijing imposed 25 percent import duties on $34 billion worth of U.S. goods, including soybeans. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 13 - USDA expects record soy production, corn yields 

The U.S. Agriculture Department on Friday raised its outlook for domestic corn and soybean harvests by a more than expected amount due to good weather during key phases of development. The increased domestic projections, which pushed futures markets sharply lower, will boost the U.S. soybean stockpile to its biggest ever while a trade war with China threatens to shut off the top market for the oilseed. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 13 - Bearish USDA data strikes down funds' growing CBOT optimism - Braun 

Speculators last week remained stubbornly bearish toward Chicago-traded soybeans, added to big bullish wheat positions, and chipped away at corn pessimism, but U.S. government data published on Friday spawned heavy selling across all three commodities. Wheat output estimates out of the European Union continued to fall last week, and it appeared likely that major exporter Ukraine this year will ship a smaller volume of wheat than the previous year. This and flip-flopping weather forecasts in the United States supported Chicago wheat, corn and soybean prices through last Tuesday. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 13 - Monsanto ordered to pay $289 million in world's first Roundup cancer trial 

A California jury on Friday found Monsanto liable in a lawsuit filed by a man who alleged the company's glyphosate-based weed-killers, including Roundup, caused his cancer and ordered the company to pay $289 million in damages. The case of school groundskeeper Dewayne Johnson was the first lawsuit to go to trial alleging glyphosate causes cancer. Monsanto, a unit of Bayer AG following a $62.5 billion acquisition by the German conglomerate, faces more than 5,000 similar lawsuits across the United States. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 13 - Southern Europe may salvage EU maize harvest but huge imports loom 

Favourable prospects for maize in southern Europe could help offset damage from drought and heatwaves further north, but the EU is still expected to import a record amount to feed livestock following a poor wheat harvest, analysts said. Widely followed analysts Strategie Grains on Thursday increased slightly their European Union grain maize crop forecast, as upgrades for countries like Romania balanced cuts in Germany or France. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 13 - China expects its U.S. agricultural imports to fall sharply 

China's imports of U.S. agricultural products will fall sharply once Beijing implements retaliatory trade measures and the country is able to cover its demand for cooking oil and animal feed, vice agriculture minister Han Jun said on Friday. The trade dispute will have a limited impact on China's agriculture sector, but hit its U.S. counterparts harder, Han Jun was quoted by state radio as saying. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 13 - Brazil-China joint ventures could boost soymeal trade - China diplomat 

Chinese and Brazilian companies could form soy-processing joint ventures as a way for Latin America's largest economy to export more processed soymeal to its top buyer of raw soybeans, a senior Chinese diplomat in Brazil said in an interview. Chinese firms overwhelmingly process soybeans in domestic plants rather than buying soymeal directly from Brazil, but companies will choose whatever gives them the best profits, said Qu Yuhui, minister-counselor in charge of political affairs at the Chinese embassy in Brasilia. Click here to read full stories.

 Aug 13 - Brazil's BRF posts heavy loss on trucker strike, trade bans 

Brazilian food processor BRF SA posted a wider-than-expected quarterly loss on Friday, hit by a nationwide trucker strike and trade embargoes triggered by allegations it had bribed food inspectors. In its first results after a management shakeup, BRF lost 1.574 billion reais ($411 million), almost three times more than the average analyst forecast and its third straight quarterly loss. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 13 - Alaska seafood industry braces for China tariff pain 

Alaska fishermen are used to coping with fickle weather and wild ocean waves. Now they face a new challenge: the United States' trade war with China, which buys $1 billion in Alaskan fish annually, making it the state’s top seafood export market. Beijing, in response to the Trump administration's move to implement extra levies on Chinese goods, last month imposed a 25 percent tariff on Pacific Northwest seafood, including Alaskan fish, in a tit-for-tat that has engulfed the world's two largest countries in a trade war. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 10 - Poor EU harvest to shrink wheat stocks, swell maize imports - analysts

Weather-hit cereal harvests in Europe will lead to tight wheat supplies in 2018/19 and leave the region reliant on record imports of maize to feed its livestock herd, analyst firm Strategie Grains said. Drought and heatwaves since late spring have withered crops in northern Europe, and French-based Strategie Grains on Thursday made another steep cut to its European Union soft wheat production forecast, now seen 10 percent below last year's level. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 10 - The rundown on U.S. corn, soy yield ahead of USDA data - Braun

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will be updating its global supply and demand outlooks on Friday at noon EDT (1600 GMT), and although that will introduce a plethora of new data, the market will be fixated on two numbers: the U.S. corn and soybean yields. Corn and soy condition scores have been elevated for much of the summer and both crops have been moving through development at record or near-record pace after prolonged heat earlier this season, which has raised some uncertainties over yields. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 10 - Danish crop harvest to fall 40 percent due to drought

Denmark's harvest of wheat, barley and rye could fall by about 40 percent from previous years as farmers suffer one of the hottest and driest summers on record, a lobby group said on Thursday. A prolonged heatwave and lack of rain have also severely damaged crops in countries such as France, Germany and Sweden, as well as the Baltic states. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 10 - China's soybean crushers focusing on South American beans for now - Ag Ministry

China's soybean crushers will focus for now on processing South American beans after buying historic volumes of the oilseed in recent months, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said on Friday in its monthly crop report. The comment is in line with expectations after crushers scooped up vast volumes of soybeans from Brazil before Beijing introduced hefty import tariffs on U.S. beans in July amid a deepening trade spat with the United States. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 10 - Analysts cut EU wheat crop outlook again on "catastrophic" north

Analysts at Strategie Grains made another steep cut to their estimate for this year's European Union soft wheat harvest, citing parched conditions in northern Europe that have led to "catastrophic" yields in Germany and Scandinavia.  In a report published on Thursday, the French-based firm projected EU soft wheat production at 127.7 million tonnes, compared with 132.4 million estimated a month ago and just under the 130 million it forecast in a late-July update. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 10 - Ukraine has opportunity to boost grain exports to Saudi - analysts

A low harvest in Europe and Riyadh's decision to cancel grain imports from Canada might give Ukraine a chance to export wheat to Saudi Arabia again this season, analysts said on Thursday. Ukraine is a major supplier of barley to Saudi Arabia but has not sold wheat to Saudi Arabia since 2016. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 10 - Straw prices soar, piling pressure on N.Europe livestock farmers

Livestock and dairy farmers across northern Europe are paying soaring prices for straw used in food and bedding for cattle, as hot, dry weather across the region reduces crops. The higher bills put further pressure on farmers already facing one of their toughest summers ever; many have had to purchase more hay for fodder because the grass on which their herds normally graze has not grown. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 10 - Australians eat 'parma' for drought-stricken farmers

Thirsty city slickers are pitching in to help farmers in Australia's parched interior by eating a pub delicacy called a "parma," with some of the proceeds marked for drought relief. The dish of fried crumbed chicken topped with tomato sauce and melted cheese, called parmagiana, or parma for short, is staple pub food across a country in the depths of a big dry. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 10 - Brazil boosts sugar, ethanol production late in July

Brazil's center-south produced 2.61 million tonnes of sugar in the second half of July, more than the 2.39 million tonnes produced in the previous two-week period, as the region on Thursday posted another strong fortnight. According to cane industry group Unica, center-south mills crushed 47.34 million tonnes of cane late in July versus 44.87 million tonnes in the first half of the month. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 10 - India offers welfare schemes 3.5 mln T of pulses at subsidised prices

India will provide 3.5 million tonnes of pulses to welfare schemes at subsidised prices as the world's biggest producer tries to dispose of surplus output. The federal government will offer pulses at a discount of 15 rupees ($0.2185) per kg to state governments for schemes such as a mid-day meal run for school children, the government said in a statement. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 10 - China reports 1st African swine fever outbreak, culls 1,000 hogs

China reported its first outbreak of the deadly African swine fever (ASF) on Friday, as authorities in Liaoning province in the country's northeast culled almost 1,000 hogs and rushed to control the highly contagious disease. News of the infection will stoke concern about its spread in the world's largest pig herd, and possibly to Japan, the Korean Peninsula and other parts of Asia. Cases have been recorded across Europe, Russia and sub-Saharan Africa, but it has never occurred in East Asia until now, according to the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). Click here to read full stories.

Aug 10 - Malaysia's July palm stocks gain less than forecast on export jump

Malaysia's palm oil stockpiles saw a slight rise in July that was below market expectations as exports climbed higher than forecast, according to official data on Friday. End-stocks rose 1.3 percent to 2.21 million tonnes in a second month of gains, while exports grew 6.8 percent from June to 1.21 million tonnes, according to the Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB).  Click here to read full stories.

Aug 10 - Gene-editing startups ignite the next 'Frankenfood' fight

In a suburban Minneapolis laboratory, a tiny company that has never turned a profit is poised to beat the world's biggest agriculture firms to market with the next potential breakthrough in genetic engineering - a crop with "edited" DNA. Calyxt Inc, an eight-year-old firm co-founded by a genetics professor, altered the genes of a soybean plant to produce healthier oil using the cutting-edge editing technique rather than conventional genetic modification. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 09 - U.S. soy trade stellar in short term, but China outlook hazy - Braun 

Market analysts have been trying to gauge China’s forward bean usage as it remains locked in a tit-for-tat tariff dispute with the United States, and the conflict has prompted threats from the East Asian country to severely reduce or ban U.S. bean imports. The future of U.S. soybean trade with China has also been a leading topic since that trade relationship supports the U.S. soybean market in its current form. The United States and Brazil account for most of the world’s soybean exports and China is the largest consumer. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 09 - Argentina wheat, corn harvest expected to break records in 2018-19 

Argentina is expected to produce a record crop of wheat and corn during the 2018-19 season as farmers planted more hectares of both than in previous years, the Rosario grains exchange said on Wednesday. The exchange's monthly report said the wheat harvest could reach 21 million tonnes. Farmers had planted 6.32 million hectares with wheat this year, more than initial predictions and up from 5.7 million hectares the prior season. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 09 - Australia's Westpac to lend A$100 mln to drought-hit farmers 

Australia's Westpac Banking Corp said on Thursday it would disburse A$100 million ($74.2 million) in cheap loans to farmers as a record dry spell hits parts of the nation, while the country's lenders fight to regain public trust amidst an ongoing misconduct inquiry. The drought in Australia's east, one of the worst on record, is impacting every area of rural life, often with global trade and price implications. Already many cattle graziers are being forced to sell stock they can no longer feed. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 09 - Germany’s grains crop lowest in 24 years after drought 

Germany’s 2018 grain harvest will be the lowest in 24 years after a drought and heatwave heavily damaged crops, the association of German farm cooperatives DRV said on Wednesday. The grain crop will fall 20.3 percent to some 36.3 million tonnes, the smallest since 1994, the association said in a harvest report. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 09 - Dimming sunlight to slow global warming may harm crop yields - study 

Spraying a veil of sun-dimming chemicals high above the Earth to slow global warming could harm crop yields in an unintended side-effect of turning down the heat, U.S. scientists said on Wednesday. Some researchers say a man-made sunshade, perhaps sulphur dioxide released high in the atmosphere, could limit rising temperatures and the after-effects like the wildfires that have ravaged California and Greece this summer . Click here to read full stories.

Aug 09 - Brazil pesticide group to appeal ruling suspending glyphosate weed killer 

Brazil-based agrochemical companies plan to appeal a ruling suspending the use of best-selling weed killer glyphosate in one of the world's largest grain producing nations, an industry spokeswoman said on Wednesday. Glyphosate, an herbicide widely sprayed on soybeans, corn and other crops that have been genetically modified to tolerate it, was suspended in Brazil by a court ruling last week pending a government reevaluation of its toxicity. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 09 - French cows herded out of Iran by U.S. sanctions, Senator says

A project to export cattle to Iran from Normandy in northern France has been halted due to the United States' renewed sanctions against Tehran, a French Senator said, as Washington's policy takes its toll on its European allies. The sanctions, following U.S. President Donald Trump's withdrawal from an international accord on Iran's nuclear programme, took effect on Tuesday. They have led many European companies to back out of investments in Iran, including French energy giant Total and car maker Peugeot.  Click here to read full stories.

Aug 09 - Brazil's Cosan posts quarterly loss on lower sugar, fuel sales 

Brazil's energy and logistics group Cosan SA Indústria e Comércio posted a quarterly net loss on Wednesday citing smaller domestic fuel sales and reduced sugar exports. Cosan, which is a partner of Royal Dutch Shell Plc in the 50-50 joint venture Raízen, the world's largest sugar producer, said in a market filing that it lost 64.3 million reais ($17.05 million) in the second quarter, slightly smaller than the 76 million reais loss a year earlier. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 09 - NZ's Fonterra reviews earnings guidance after trading halt 

New Zealand's Fonterra Co-operative Group Ltd, the world's largest dairy exporter, on Thursday sparked concerns it could downgrade its earnings guidance after it requested a trading halt pending a possible update. If Fonterra cuts its earnings guidance, as analysts expect, New Zealand's second-largest company will have trimmed its outlook twice in three months as it struggles with tight local supply and a competitive global processing sector. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 08 - China's July soybean imports fall as pre-tariff buying ebbs

China's soybean imports fell in July versus June, customs data showed on Wednesday, as processors slowed purchases after building up record inventory in preparation for the hefty import tariffs on U.S. shipments introduced last month. China, the world's largest soy buyer, imported 8.01 million tonnes of soybeans in July, down 8 percent from 8.70 million tonnes in June, figures from the General Administration of Customs of China showed. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 08 - Australia's drought-hit farms like lambs to the slaughter

Danny Stork, a livestock farmer in Glen Oak, 180 km (110 miles) north of Sydney, has 20 bales of hay left for his 100 head of cattle. He is now feeding them light rations in the hope the winter drought breaks. If it doesn't - and weather forecasts suggest it won't - he will run out of feed and water within weeks, leaving him little option but to send his livestock to the abattoir. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 08 - Saudi Arabian agency stops buying Canadian wheat, barley

Saudi Arabia's main state wheat buying agency has told grains exporters it will no longer buy Canadian wheat and barley in its international tenders, European traders said on Tuesday, as a diplomatic dispute between the two countries escalates. Traders said they had received an official notice from the Saudi Grains Organization (SAGO) about its decision. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 08 - First trial alleging Monsanto's Roundup causes cancer goes to jury

A trial in which a school groundskeeper alleged that his use of Monsanto's Roundup weed killer caused his terminal cancer will go to a California jury after lawyers for both sides delivered their closing arguments on Tuesday. Groundskeeper Dewayne Johnson is one of more than 5,000 plaintiffs across the United States who claim Monsanto's glyphosate-containing herbicides, including the widely-used Roundup, cause cancer. His case, the first to go to trial, began in San Francisco's Superior Court of California four weeks ago. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 08 - Ships reduce cargoes amid water drop in Argentina's Parana River

Large grain transport ships using Argentine's port hub of Rosario have had to reduce their cargo by between 3,200 and 4,300 tonnes because of an unusually low water level in the Parana River, the Rosario grains exchange said on Tuesday. The Parana River is used to transport approximately 80 percent of Argentina's agricultural and agroindustrial exports to international markets, but a drought at its origin in southern Brazil has seen its level drop by up to half a metre. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 08 - Morocco agrees to accept U.S. poultry - USTR, USDA

Morocco has agreed to accept imports of American poultry products for the first time, the U.S. Trade Representative's office and the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Tuesday, estimating initial annual shipments at about $10 million. The agreement reverses Morocco's previous ban on U.S. poultry that was based on food safety concerns despite a free trade agreement between the two countries. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 08 - Brazil's JBS importing more corn from Argentina - source

JBS SA, the world's largest meatpacker, is importing more corn from Argentina into Brazil for feed as rising local freight costs push up prices for the domestic crop, a person with knowledge of the matter said on Tuesday. JBS operations in Brazil had resorted to importing the grain earlier this year, at the end of the country's smaller first corn harvest, for feed in the southern state of Santa Catarina, where it operates several meatprocessing plants. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 08 - Cuba sweetens land grant program for farmers

Cuba said on Tuesday it was doubling the amount of land it granted would-be farmers and the lengths of their leases in an effort to increase stagnating agricultural output. The state owns 80 percent of the land and leases most of that to farmers and cooperatives. The remainder is owned by some 400,000 private family farmers and their cooperatives. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 07 - Analyst sharply cuts Ukraine 2018/19 peas harvest, export forecast

Ukraine's UkrAgroConsult agriculture consultancy on Tuesday sharply reduced its forecast for the country's 2018 peas harvest to 850,000 tonnes from the previous estimate of 1.1 million tonnes. It also cut the 2018/19 July-June peas exports forecast by 29 percent to 600,000 tonnes. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 07 - Bunge's agribusiness head to leave company

Global grain trader Bunge Ltd said on Monday that the head of its largest unit, agribusiness, is retiring, days after the company reported a surprise quarterly loss. Brian Thomsen, 51, made "a personal decision" to step down at the end of the year, according to a company statement. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 07 - Crop Watch: Slight dip in corn yield, soy outlook steady - Braun

The Crop Watch corn and soybean fields continue at their ahead-of-average pace but the corn yield expectations declined slightly from last week’s high as the pace might be slightly too quick and parts of the western Corn Belt have been dry. Soybean conditions improved to the best score of the season, and although the prospects are good overall, most of the producers are still counting on ample rains in August to boost confidence in the crop. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 07 - Indonesia bets big on biodiesel to limit costs of oil imports

Indonesia plans to require all diesel fuel used in the country contain biodiesel starting next month to boost palm oil consumption, slash fuel imports, and narrow a yawning current account gap. While the proposal has been welcomed by the palm oil industry and government, it has raised concerns among the automobile industry the fuel could impact engine performance. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 07 - Brazil judge suspends use of agrochemical glyphosate

A Brazilian judge has suspended the use of products containing the agrochemical glyphosate, a widely employed herbicide for soy and other crops in the country, according to legal filings. A federal judge in Brasilia ruled that new products containing the chemical could not be registered in the country and existing registrations would be suspended within the next 30 days, until the government reevaluates their toxicology. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 07 - Russian wheat export prices extend rally amid crop setbacks

Russian wheat export prices continued to rise steeply last week amid worsening crop harvest forecasts across countries in Europe and the Black Sea region, analysts said on Monday. Black Sea prices for Russian wheat with 12.5 percent protein content were $234 per tonne on a free on board basis at the end of last week, up from $223 a week earlier, Russian agricultural consultancy IKAR said in a note. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 07 - Swiss aid drought-hit farmers, pull dead fish from Rhine

Switzerland will cut import tariffs on livestock feed and offer interest-free loans to help farmers deal with a drought, the federal government said on Monday, amid a heat wave that is killing off fish in the Rhine. The tariff on imports of hay and silo maize would be brought down to zero from three Swiss francs per 100 kg, a spokesman for the federal agriculture agency said. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 07 - French seed group Vilmorin says too early to see weather, trade effects

France's Vilmorin, one of the world's largest seed makers, said it was too early to tell if drought and heatwaves that have scorched European farmland and sent grain prices soaring would have a significant effect on its growth in the coming year. Rising crop prices are generally favourable for Vilmorin as they boost the income of its customers while higher oil prices have also made biofuels made with crops like maize (corn) more attractive, Chief Financial Officer Vincent Supiot said. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 07 - Tyson Foods beats profit estimates on strong beef demand

Tyson Foods Inc beat analysts' quarterly profit estimates on Monday as the No. 1 U.S. meat processor reported a record operating income for its beef business due to increased exports and cattle supplies. Stronger demand for beef offset weaker results in Tyson's pork and chicken units, which the company said were hurt by trade disputes between the United States and major importers such as Mexico and China. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 06 - Edible oil traders use free-trade pact to get around India's import tax hike 

Edible oil traders are sourcing exports of palm oil and other cooking oils to India from neighbouring countries, designating the supplies as duty-free under a regional free-trade pact and circumventing India's import tax hike on the oils. India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka are among the signatories of the South Asian Free Trade Agreement (SAFTA) that created a free-trade zone in the South Asian region. The rising flow of duty-free edible oils is disrupting trade in India, the world's biggest importer of the oils, and is undermining efforts to raise local oilseed prices, the reason for imposing the taxes. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 06 - Farming impact of Australia's worst drought in living memory 

The worst drought in living memory is sweeping parts of eastern Australia, leaving farmers struggling to cope and asking questions about their future. Record-low rainfall in some regions and successive seasons of above-average temperatures have blighted vast tracts of Australia's grazing and crop land. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 06 - China could cut soybean imports by over 10 mln T this year - media 

China is likely to cut imports of soybeans by more than 10 million tonnes this year, thanks to new soymeal technology and the use of supplements such as sunflower seeds and palm seeds, state media Economic Daily reported on Monday. The use of low-protein formula in animal feed could cut China's annual demand for soymeal by 5-7 percent, equal to about 5 million tonnes of soybeans, the newspaper said, citing Yin Yulong of China Academy of Science. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 06 - Funds snap up CBOT grains but stay sidelined on soy - Braun 

Commodity investors last week bought the most Chicago-traded grain and oilseed contracts of any week since early March, and this was almost entirely driven by heavy buying in wheat and corn. Confirmation keeps arriving that global wheat production is slipping to multi-year lows, especially in Europe, propping up grain markets worldwide. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 06 - Argentina plans to export major amounts of soymeal to China in 2019 

Argentina expects to export significant amounts of soymeal to China starting after the next harvest in May, a top agriculture ministry official said on Friday, as the South American grains powerhouse moves to take advantage of U.S.-China trade strife. Argentine officials were in Beijing on Friday finalizing the paperwork needed to ship the country's livestock feed to China, ministry Chief of Staff Santiago del Solar said in an interview. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 06 - Informa raises U.S. 2018 soy yield forecast; corn unchanged - trade 

Private analytics firm Informa Economics raised its forecast for the 2018 U.S. soybean yield to 50.0 bushels per acre (bpa), from 49.8 previously, and left its U.S. corn yield forecast unchanged at 176.0 bpa, trade sources said on Friday. Informa projected U.S. 2018 corn production at 14.392 billion bushels and soybean output at 4.445 billion bushels. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 06 - Malaysia end-July palm oil stocks expected to hit 5-mth top 

Malaysia's palm oil stocks are expected to have risen to their highest in five months at end-July, a second straight gain as output growth outpaced exports, according to a Reuters survey. Rising stockpiles could pressure benchmark palm oil prices, which fell nearly to a three-year low on July 25. Palm oil prices on Monday rose 0.8 percent to 2,214 ringgit ($543.31) a tonne by the midday break.  Click here to read full stories.

Aug 06 - DowDuPont "defers" field trials to seek sale of GM corn seed in India 

DowDuPont Inc has told India it is putting off trials needed for approval to sell a genetically modified variety of corn, taking a cue from U.S. rival Monsanto that has also pulled a similar application due to intellectual property concerns. In a letter addressed to India's environment ministry reviewed by Reuters, the Indian arm of DowDuPont said it had obtained permission to conduct trials growing a small crop of the corn in the northern state of Punjab but would like to "defer the undertaking". Click here to read full stories.

Aug 06 - Chinese researchers charged in conspiracy to steal U.S. rice technology 

Two agricultural researchers from China were charged on Friday in connection with a 2013 attempt to steal U.S. rice technology for use in the medical field. A U.S. grand jury indicted Liu Xuejun, 49, and Sun Yue, 36, for conspiracy to steal trade secrets and conspiracy to commit interstate transportation of stolen property, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Arkansas. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 06 - Trump administration lifts GMO crop ban for U.S. wildlife refuges 

The Trump administration has rescinded an Obama-era ban on the use of pesticides linked to declining bee populations and the cultivation of genetically modified crops in dozens of national wildlife refuges where farming is permitted. Environmentalists, who had sued to bring about the 2-year-old ban, said on Friday that lifting the restriction poses a grave threat to pollinating insects and other sensitive creatures relying on toxic-free habitats afforded by wildlife refuges. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 06 - Sime Darby Plantations' Salleh named chairman of Malaysia Palm Oil Board 

The Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB) said on Monday Sime Darby Plantations' managing director, Mohd Bakke Salleh, has been appointed as chairman of the industry regulator and research body for a two-year term effective July 31. Mohd Bakke Salleh previously served as the chief executive of Felda Global Ventures Holdings Berhad (FGV)  and Lembaga Tabung Haji (LTH), Malaysia's pilgrimage fund to Mecca, according to a statement, and replaced outgoing MPOB chairman Ahmad Hamzah. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 03 - ADM takes early lead in fight for trade war spoils, Bunge stumbles 

Agricultural commodities trader Archer Daniels Midland Co has so far weathered the U.S.-China trade war better than rival Bunge Ltd with a more conservative trading strategy, diversified crop sales and limited exposure to Brazil's currency swings. The companies perform similar functions: buying, selling, transporting and processing crops around the world. However their starkly different second-quarter earnings show how varying strategies can produce drastically different results, providing lessons for other global grain traders. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 03 - Heatwave ravages European fields, sending wheat prices soaring 

Searing heat has devastated wheat fields across northern Europe while a combination of dry conditions and extreme rain in the Black Sea have hit output estimates, with prices soaring on fears of further crop damage. Evidence of serious harm to crops is growing as harvesting heads north in Germany, the European Union's second largest wheat producer, and in Scandinavia, prompting further cuts to estimates for the 28-member bloc. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 03 - Argentine soy crushers seen gaining access to Chinese meal market - industry group 

Argentina's soybean crushers could gain access to the Chinese soymeal market "in the coming months," the head of the country's CIARA oilseed crushers industry group told Reuters on Thursday. The South American country's government will present China with a list of companies seeking permission to export soymeal, which includes all Argentine soy crushers including the local units of Bunge and Cargill, CIARA President Gustavo Idigoras said in an interview. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 03 - World food prices down 3.7 pct m/m in July - U.N. FAO 

World food prices fell 3.7 percent in July from the month before, the sharpest monthly drop since last December, with declines seen across all crop types, the United Nations food agency said on Thursday. The Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAO) food price index, which measures monthly changes for a basket of cereals, oilseeds, dairy products, meat and sugar, averaged 168.8 points last month, against an upwardly revised 175.3 in June. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 03 - Brazil's FS Bioenergia bullish on corn ethanol after slow start 

FS Bioenergia, Brazil's first corn-only ethanol producer, will press on with plans to build a second plant despite its first unit failing to reach full production capacity during its first year, an executive said on Wednesday. FS Bionergia, a joint venture of U.S.-based Summit Agricultural Group and local partner Tapajós Participações, processed 520,000 tonnes of corn and produced 220 million liters of ethanol in the first year of operation, below installed capacity of 650,000 tonnes and 250 million liters, Chief Executive Rafael Abud said in an interview. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 03 - Brazil soybean farmers face 20 pct jump in fertilizer, pesticide cost 

Brazilian soybean farmers face a rise of about 20 percent in fertilizer and pesticide costs ahead of the 2018/19 crop cycle, which will be planted from around September, according to a senior agribusiness analyst at investment bank Itaú BBA. A rise in farm input costs will likely reduce margins for farmers in Brazil's agricultural heartland, Guilherme Bellotti said during a presentation. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 03 - Commodities may be first to show real impact of Trump-China trade war: Russell 

The Phoney War stage of U.S. President Donald Trump's trade dispute with China may be ending, with economic indicators and commodity flows and prices starting to show real world effects. The latest signal that China's economy may be feeling some pain associated with Trump's tariffs on about $34 billion in Chinese goods was the softening of the Purchasing Managers' Index (PMI) in July. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 03 - DowDuPont sees higher raw material costs, shares fall 

DowDuPont Inc said it expects higher raw material costs to hit all its units for the rest of the year even as an uptick in its agriculture business helped the U.S. chemicals producer beat Street estimates for the fourth straight quarter. Shares of the company fell 3 percent to $66.11 in morning trade and were the biggest drag on the S&P 500 index at 1500 GMT. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 03 - Fertilizer maker Nutrien sees continued US farmer spending during trade war 

U.S. farmers continue to spend on fertilizer despite an escalating trade war between the United States and China that has depressed crop prices, but their fears about the financial impact may grow if the fight extends beyond the harvest, the chief executive of Nutrien Ltd said on Thursday. China on Thursday urged the United States to "calm down" and return to reason after the Trump administration proposed a higher 25 percent tariff on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports.  Click here to read full stories.

Aug 03 - Commission offers assistance to EU Farmers struck by drought 

The European Commission said on Thursday it had loosened agricultural regulations and would speed up payments to EU farmers hit by extreme droughts. As Europe grapples with one of the hottest summers on record, the Commission said the move was aimed at counteracting the decrease in production of crops and avoid further hardship for farmers. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 02 - Weather woes ravage Europe's wheat fields, markets race higher 

Scorching temperatures have devastated wheat fields across northern Europe while a combination of dry conditions and extreme rain in the Black Sea bread basket have sunk output estimates, with fears of further damage causing prices to soar. As harvesting heads north in Germany, the European Union's second largest wheat producer behind France, more evidence of serious damage to crops is emerging - prompting observers to cut crop estimates repeatedly for the 28-member bloc. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 02 - Bunge posts surprise loss; blames bets on trade war truce 

Global grains merchant Bunge Ltd reported a surprise quarterly loss on Wednesday after being caught wrong-footed in the soybean futures market with bets that a trade war between the United States and China would be averted. Bunge stock fell 3.9 percent to $66.42 a share. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 02 - EU touts jump in soybean imports from US 

EU soybean imports from the United States almost quadrupled early in the new marketing year, the European Union said, a week after it struck a deal with U.S. President Donald Trump to avert a trade row, as buyers responded to a sharp drop in prices. The EU said in a statement that the collation of new bi-monthly import data showing the rise was "the first concrete follow-up to the EU-U.S. joint statement agreed in Washington between Commission President Juncker and U.S. President Trump". Click here to read full stories.

Aug 02 - Australia's drought-hit farmers to miss any benefit from U.S.-China trade war 

Australian farmers, suffering from a second year of drought, are unlikely to benefit from a U.S.-China trade war because of lower production of key crops including wheat and sorghum, traders and industry officials said on Wednesday. The withering dry spell across Australia's east coast is expected to reduce wheat crop yields in the world's fourth largest exporter of the grain. It has already hit summer crops such as sorghum, where China is a major buyer. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 02 - Indonesia to make biodiesel use compulsory from Sept. 1 - official 

Indonesia aims to make the use of biodiesel blended fuels compulsory for all vehicles and heavy machinery from Sept. 1, Renewable Energy Director General Rida Mulyana said on Wednesday, amid efforts to reduce the current account deficit in Southeast Asia's biggest economy. President Joko Widodo in a cabinet meeting a day earlier said he wanted an immediate implementation of Indonesia's biodiesel expansion programme to help save billions of dollars in diesel imports. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 02 - Drought to slash German grain crop by a fifth - farm lobby 

Germany's 2018 grains harvest will slump about 20 percent on the year to around 36 million tonnes after crops suffered massive damage from drought and a heatwave, German farmers association DBV said on Wednesday. Germany is the European Union's No.2 grain producer after France, and in most years the EU’s largest producer of rapeseed, Europe's main oilseed for edible oil. But German crops wilted under the highest May temperatures since 1881 and exceptionally dry weather in June and July.  Click here to read full stories.

Aug 02 - "Superfood" craze makes big business of Africa's baobab 

Taerou Dieuhiou has been shinning barefoot up baobab trees in Senegal's southern Casamance region to collect the oblong fruit since he was 15. Business has never been better. Inside the hard, green shell that dangles from the spindly branches of Africa's most iconic tree is a citrussy pulp that has become a popular "superfood" in the United States and Europe. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 02 - Brazil's BRF launches 'bio' chicken line in bid to boost profits 

BRF SA will launch a line of chicken products aimed at health-conscious Brazilians, the company's marketing director said on Wednesday, as Brazil's largest poultry processor grapples with a meat glut after a series of export bans. Rodrigo Lacerda said the initiative, the first since Chief Executive Pedro Parente joined the company, is an attempt to grow profitably through higher value products. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 02 - India's monsoon rain forecast cut, farm output seen at risk 

India is likely to receive below-normal monsoon rains in 2018, a private weather forecaster said on Wednesday, raising concerns over farm output and economic growth in Asia's third-biggest economy, where half the farmland lacks irrigation. The monsoon delivers about 70 percent of India's annual rainfall, critical for the farm sector that accounts for about 14 percent of India's $2 trillion economy and employs more than half of the country's 1.3 billion people. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 02 - India may reduce wheat import duty after patchy monsoon rains - consultant 

India may cut its wheat import duty as domestic prices rise and patchy monsoon rains cast doubts about wheat production, an agriculture specialist said on Thursday. "The government may be forced to reduce the import duty on wheat because monsoon rains have been deficient in some parts of the country and prices are rising," said Guruswamy Chandrashekhar, a global agribusiness and commodities specialist. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 02 - Brazil chicken exports hit record high in July 

Brazil's chicken exports rose to a record monthly high in July following the end of a truckers' strike in May, meat industry group ABPA said on Wednesday after the government released fresh trade data for a wide range of products. Chicken exports, including fresh and processed products, rose by almost 21 percent in July from the same month a year earlier, to 463,100 tonnes. That volume generated revenues of $711 million in the period, according to ABPA. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 02 - Germany considering aid for livestock farms after drought  

Germany's government is considering special aid for livestock farmers to help them overcome a sharp rise in animal feed prices after this summer's drought, German agriculture minister Julia Kloeckner said on Wednesday. "In many regions we are suffering from a massive shortage of animal feed," Kloeckner said at a press conference. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 02 - Fertilizer maker Nutrien's beats profit estimates, raises forecast 

Canadian fertilizer and farm supply dealer Nutrien Ltd posted a better-than-expected quarterly profit on Wednesday, driven by higher prices for potash and nitrogen fertilizers. The company raised its forecast for potash sales volumes to between 12.3 and 12.8 million tonnes, citing strong global potash demand. This compares to a May projection in the range of 12 million tonnes to 12.5 million tonnes. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 01 - Ukraine to boost grains production with eyes on China

Ukraine is aiming to boost grains and oilseed exports to China as rising consumption and trade tensions between Washington and Beijing create new opportunities, a senior industry official said on Wednesday. The Black Sea region's top producers, Russia and Ukraine, have been increasing their presence in the global grains and oilseed market, offering stiff competition to exporters in America and Europe. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 01 - Corn may be an unintended trade war victim in 2019 -Braun 

U.S. corn supply is predicted to plunge by 23 percent over the next year, but the tighter domestic market may be a short-lived phenomenon pending the resolution of the U.S.-China trade war. The world’s two largest economies have been embroiled in a trade battle in which Beijing hit U.S. soybeans with a 25 percent tariff, crippling Chicago soybean futures and spurring last week’s $12 billion farmer aid package from the U.S. government. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 01 - Trump defends trade and tariff policies at Tampa rally 

U.S. President Donald Trump defended his trade policies on Tuesday in a speech in Florida and said American farmers hurt by retaliatory tariffs from China were bearing up, in a sign he is feeling some political heat on the issue. Trump's rally speech in Tampa contained many elements familiar to his political events. Several hecklers were ejected and the crowd at the state fairgrounds was big and loud. Trump attacked public opinion polls, except one that said he was popular among Republicans. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 01 - Indian farm product tariffs curbing Australian exports-minister 

Australia's exports of farm products to India have taken a hit because of new tariffs and free trade negotiations between the two countries have stalled, trade minister Steven Ciobo said on Wednesday. "Australian farm exporters to India have been whacked with a range of new trade distortions over the past year," Ciobo told a grains industry conference in Melbourne. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 01 - ADM earnings double, helped by U.S.-China trade row 

Archer Daniels Midland Co's net profits doubled in the second quarter and beat Wall Street estimates, after a drought in Argentina and the U.S.-China trade spat boosted the U.S. grain merchant's trading and oilseed processing businesses. Shares were up 1 percent at $47.86 after touching a three-year high on the New York Stock Exchange. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 01 - Ukraine expects record maize harvest, rising sales to China 

Ukraine's maize harvest may hit a record 27-28 million tonnes this year and sales to China could rise by 10 percent due to the trade war between Washington and Beijing, the country's acting agriculture minister said. China has accused the United States of triggering the "largest-scale trade war" with import duties, potentially giving a further boost to already booming grain and oilseed exports from the Black Sea region. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 01 - Wheat supply tightens, but prices capped by U.S. inventories 

The global wheat market is facing a period of tighter supply from dry weather in key exporters, but large U.S. inventories will likely cap the U.S. futures market at around $6 a bushel, the head of a commodity analytics firm said on Tuesday. Global wheat prices have been rising as dry conditions are expected to curb production in Europe and the Black Sea region as well as Australia, following years of bumper production. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 01 - Indonesia president pushes biodiesel plan to stop currency tanking 

Indonesia's president called on Tuesday for the immediate implementation of a plan to widen the use of biodiesel that his economic ministers hope will cut the country's fuel import bill by billions of dollars and halt a decline in the rupiah currency. Joko Widodo also sounded an alarm on the foreign exchange reserves of Southeast Asia's largest economy, less than a week after he pleaded with exporters to bring home earnings they currently keep offshore to stem the slide in the rupiah. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 01 - German farmers step up $1 bln aid call after drought damage 

German farmers intensified calls for around 1 billion euros ($1.17 billion) in special aid on Tuesday after crop damage from a drought and heatwave, but Berlin said it would wait for an August harvest report before making a decision. The president of German farming association DBV, Joachim Rukwied, said drought had caused 1.4 million euros ($1.6 million) of damage to grains crops alone this year. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 01 - Rains hit on Bulgaria's 2018 wheat harvest 

Extensive rains in July have hit Bulgaria's wheat sowings and are likely to cut its 2018 crop to about 5.5 million tonnes, with average yields down some 7 percent from a year ago, a senior official at the agriculture ministry said on Tuesday. In June, the ministry hoped that the wheat crop would match last year's bumper crop of 6.1 million tonnes. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 01 - Swedish wheat crop may fall 40 pct on the year on dryness, heat 

Sweden's wheat harvest could fall by more than 40 percent on the year, hit by dryness and a heatwave, the head of the grain unit of giant Swedish farm cooperative Lantmannen said, joining other producers around the world roiled by adverse weather. It is the latest in a series of indications that a lack of rain and extreme heat have damaged crops in countries such as France, Germany and the Baltics. Click here to read full stories.

Aug 01 - Europe's top beet producer to start making lower-sugar sweetener

Suedzucker, Europe's largest beet producer, will start making a sweetener with less sugar to help foodmakers cut the amount needed in treats and cakes, as the industry responds to growing consumer demand for lower sugar content. The German company has signed an agreement with Tel Aviv-based DouxMatouk to produce a sweetener with the same degree of sweetness but an average of 40 percent less sugar, they said in a statement on Tuesday. Commercial-scale production is expected by mid-2019, they added. Click here to read full stories.